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DHM2607. At the Setting of the Sun by Simon Atack. <p> A scene played out daily by Fighter Command squadrons throughout the defining air battles fought in the summer of 1940. Mk I Hurricanes of 249 Squadron are seen returning to North Weald after heavy action over London during the culmination of the Battle of Britain in September of that year. It is evening, and the squadron has been operational since first light. Most of the pilots have flown four missions on this day, and they will be in the air again tomorrow at dawn. And so it will go till the battle is won. In this quite beautiful painting, Simon Atack shows Tom Neils Hurricane in the foreground. He has suffered battle damage but, as so often with the trusty Hurricane, his steed will carry him safely home to fight again. <b><p> Signatories: <a href=profiles.php?SigID=420>Sqn Ldr Douglas G Clift (deceased)</a>, and <a href=profiles.php?SigID=52>Wng Com Tom F Neil DFC AFC.</a> <p> Signed limited edition of 500 prints, with 2 signatures .  <p>Print paper size 20.5 inches x 19 inches (52cm x 48cm)
B0094D. Close Encounter by Ivan Berryman. <p>Supermarine Spitfire Mk.1As of No.610 (County of Chester) Sqn RAAF, intercept incoming Heinkel 111H-16s of the 9th Staffel, Kampfgeschwader 53 Legion Condor during the big daylight raids on London of August and September 1940 – the climax of the Battle of Britain.  Spitfire N3029 (DW-K) was shot down by a Bf109 on the 5th of September 1940 and crash-landed near Gravesend, Kent, thankfully without injury to Sgt Willcocks, the pilot.  For the record, N3029 was rebuilt and, following some brief flying in the UK, was sent overseas by convoy to the Middle East.  Ironically, the ship carrying this aircraft was torpedoed en route and both ship and all its cargo were lost.<b><p>Signed by <a href=profiles.php?SigID=1446>Kurt Dahlmann</a> and <a href=profiles.php?SigID=7>Wing Commander John Freeborn DFC* (deceased)</a>. <p>Dahlmann Knights Cross / Freeborn DFC signature edition of 100 prints from the signed limited edition of 1150 prints. <p> Image size 25 inches x 15 inches (64cm x 38cm)
DHM1708F. In Them We Trust by Ivan Berryman. <p> Two Spitfire Mk1Bs of 92 Squadron patrol the south coast from their temporary base at Ford, here passing over the Needles rocks, Isle of Wight, in the Spring of 1942. <b><p>Signed by <a href=profiles.php?SigID=33>Group Captain Billy Drake DSO DFC* (deceased)</a>. <p>Billy Drake Signature Edition of 100 prints (Nos 51 - 150) from the signed limited edition of 1150 prints. <p> Image size 17 inches x 12 inches (43cm x 31cm)
DHM872.  Fighter General by Graeme Lothian. <p>Fighter general shows Dolfo Galland leading a schwarm of BF109s out low at tree top height over the Kent countryside after doing battle with spitfires, during the last week of August 1940. This remarkable pilot was awarded the Knights Cross as a Major on the 15th August. His daring and leadership won the hearts of his men and respect from RAF Pilots. The Oak leaves was awarded on the 23rd September 1940 and crossed Swords in June 1941 after 69 victories.  At the end of 1941 at age only 29 he was promoted Inspector General of the Fighter Arm. Leaving his post as Kommodore JG26 to Gerhard Schoepfel he was awarded the Diamonds to the Knights Cross in January 1942 at Oberst. As the youngest General in the German High Command he held this post until 1944, after open disagreements with Goring let to his dismissal. Reverting to combat flying he formed, with Steinhoff, the legendary JV-44, flying the ME262 jet fighter. His score by wars end stood at 104 all on the western Front. he was the only General to lead a squadron into battle.<b><p>Signed by <a href=profiles.php?SigID=243>General Walter Krupinski (deceased)</a>, <br><a href=profiles.php?SigID=237>Major Erich Rudorffer</a>, <br><a href=profiles.php?SigID=274>Major Gerhard Schopfel (deceased)</a>, <br><a href=profiles.php?SigID=246>Major Heinz Lange (deceased)</a>, <br><a href=profiles.php?SigID=271>Oberfeldwebel Heinz Marquardt (deceased)</a>, <br><a href=profiles.php?SigID=265>Captain Ernst-Wilhelm Reinert (deceased)</a>, <br><a href=profiles.php?SigID=699>Leutnant Fritz Tegtmeier (deceased)</a> <br>and <br><a href=profiles.php?SigID=697>Oberleutenant Peter Düttman (deceased)</a>. <p>Signed limited edition of 500 prints.  <p>Image size 28 inches x 17 inches (71cm x 43cm)
B0303F. Hurricane Mk.IIC by Ivan Berryman. <p> Hurricane Mk.IIC Z3971 of 253 Sqn, closing on a Heinkel 111. <b><p>Signed by <a href=profiles.php?SigID=1236>Group Captain Byron Duckenfield AFC (deceased)</a>.<p>Artist Special Reserve edition of 50 prints. <p> Image size 12 inches x 9 inches (31cm x 23cm)
DHM6003. Where Thoroughbreds Play by Ivan Berryman. <p> A pair of Spitfire Mk 1s of 92 Sqn, based at Pembrey, practising dogfight tactics in a rare moment of relative peace in August 1940.  Nearest aircraft, N3249, (QJ-P) is that of Sgt Ralph <i>Titch</i> Havercroft who was to score 3 confirmed victories, 2 unconfirmed, one shared and three probables during his combat career. <b><p>Limited edition of 1150 prints.  <p> Image size 12 inches x 9 inches (31cm x 23cm)

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Battle of Britain Signature Print Pack.

DPK0297. Battle of Britain Signature Print Pack.

Aviation Print Pack.

Items in this pack :

Item #1 - Click to view individual item

DHM2607. At the Setting of the Sun by Simon Atack.

A scene played out daily by Fighter Command squadrons throughout the defining air battles fought in the summer of 1940. Mk I Hurricanes of 249 Squadron are seen returning to North Weald after heavy action over London during the culmination of the Battle of Britain in September of that year. It is evening, and the squadron has been operational since first light. Most of the pilots have flown four missions on this day, and they will be in the air again tomorrow at dawn. And so it will go till the battle is won. In this quite beautiful painting, Simon Atack shows Tom Neils Hurricane in the foreground. He has suffered battle damage but, as so often with the trusty Hurricane, his steed will carry him safely home to fight again.

Signatories: Sqn Ldr Douglas G Clift (deceased), and Wng Com Tom F Neil DFC AFC.

Signed limited edition of 500 prints, with 2 signatures .

Print paper size 20.5 inches x 19 inches (52cm x 48cm)


Item #2 - Click to view individual item

B0094D. Close Encounter by Ivan Berryman.

Supermarine Spitfire Mk.1As of No.610 (County of Chester) Sqn RAAF, intercept incoming Heinkel 111H-16s of the 9th Staffel, Kampfgeschwader 53 Legion Condor during the big daylight raids on London of August and September 1940 – the climax of the Battle of Britain. Spitfire N3029 (DW-K) was shot down by a Bf109 on the 5th of September 1940 and crash-landed near Gravesend, Kent, thankfully without injury to Sgt Willcocks, the pilot. For the record, N3029 was rebuilt and, following some brief flying in the UK, was sent overseas by convoy to the Middle East. Ironically, the ship carrying this aircraft was torpedoed en route and both ship and all its cargo were lost.

Signed by Kurt Dahlmann and Wing Commander John Freeborn DFC* (deceased).

Dahlmann Knights Cross / Freeborn DFC signature edition of 100 prints from the signed limited edition of 1150 prints.

Image size 25 inches x 15 inches (64cm x 38cm)


Item #3 - Click to view individual item

DHM1708F. In Them We Trust by Ivan Berryman.

Two Spitfire Mk1Bs of 92 Squadron patrol the south coast from their temporary base at Ford, here passing over the Needles rocks, Isle of Wight, in the Spring of 1942.

Signed by Group Captain Billy Drake DSO DFC* (deceased).

Billy Drake Signature Edition of 100 prints (Nos 51 - 150) from the signed limited edition of 1150 prints.

Image size 17 inches x 12 inches (43cm x 31cm)


Item #4 - Click to view individual item

DHM872. Fighter General by Graeme Lothian.

Fighter general shows Dolfo Galland leading a schwarm of BF109s out low at tree top height over the Kent countryside after doing battle with spitfires, during the last week of August 1940. This remarkable pilot was awarded the Knights Cross as a Major on the 15th August. His daring and leadership won the hearts of his men and respect from RAF Pilots. The Oak leaves was awarded on the 23rd September 1940 and crossed Swords in June 1941 after 69 victories. At the end of 1941 at age only 29 he was promoted Inspector General of the Fighter Arm. Leaving his post as Kommodore JG26 to Gerhard Schoepfel he was awarded the Diamonds to the Knights Cross in January 1942 at Oberst. As the youngest General in the German High Command he held this post until 1944, after open disagreements with Goring let to his dismissal. Reverting to combat flying he formed, with Steinhoff, the legendary JV-44, flying the ME262 jet fighter. His score by wars end stood at 104 all on the western Front. he was the only General to lead a squadron into battle.

Signed by General Walter Krupinski (deceased),
Major Erich Rudorffer,
Major Gerhard Schopfel (deceased),
Major Heinz Lange (deceased),
Oberfeldwebel Heinz Marquardt (deceased),
Captain Ernst-Wilhelm Reinert (deceased),
Leutnant Fritz Tegtmeier (deceased)
and
Oberleutenant Peter Düttman (deceased).

Signed limited edition of 500 prints.

Image size 28 inches x 17 inches (71cm x 43cm)


Item #5 - Click to view individual item

B0303F. Hurricane Mk.IIC by Ivan Berryman.

Hurricane Mk.IIC Z3971 of 253 Sqn, closing on a Heinkel 111.

Signed by Group Captain Byron Duckenfield AFC (deceased).

Artist Special Reserve edition of 50 prints.

Image size 12 inches x 9 inches (31cm x 23cm)


Item #6 - Click to view individual item

DHM6003. Where Thoroughbreds Play by Ivan Berryman.

A pair of Spitfire Mk 1s of 92 Sqn, based at Pembrey, practising dogfight tactics in a rare moment of relative peace in August 1940. Nearest aircraft, N3249, (QJ-P) is that of Sgt Ralph Titch Havercroft who was to score 3 confirmed victories, 2 unconfirmed, one shared and three probables during his combat career.

Limited edition of 1150 prints.

Image size 12 inches x 9 inches (31cm x 23cm)


Website Price: £ 360.00  

To purchase these prints individually at their normal retail price would cost £870.00 . By buying them together in this special pack, you save £510




All prices are displayed in British Pounds Sterling

 

Signatures on this item
*The value given for each signature has been calculated by us based on the historical significance and rarity of the signature. Values of many pilot signatures have risen in recent years and will likely continue to rise as they become more and more rare.
NameInfo


The signature of Squadron Leader Douglas G Clift (deceased)

Squadron Leader Douglas G Clift (deceased)
*Signature Value : £45 (matted)

Squadron Leader Douglas G Clift was born in 1919 and joined the RAF in January 1939. Douglas Clift arrived at 11 Group Pool, St Athan on 24 October 1939 and after converting to Hurricanes, he joined 79 Squadron at Biggin Hill on November 17. On 15 August 1940 Clift claimed a Bf 110 destroyed and on 30 August he shared in the destruction of a He 111. In July 1941 he was posted to the Central Flying School at Upavon for an instructor's course. Clift later volunteered for the Merchant Ship Fighter Unit (MSFU) and served with it until October 1942. He remained on flying duties for the rest of the war, finishing up in South-East Asia with the Royal Indian Air Force (RIAF). After the war Clift served with 34 Squadron flying photo-reconnaissance Spitfires until its disbandment in August 1947. later he became a radar specialist, sadly Squadron Leader Douglas G Clift passed away on the 31st December 2008 aged 89.


The signature of Wing Commander Tom Neil DFC* AFC

Wing Commander Tom Neil DFC* AFC
*Signature Value : £45 (matted)

Tom Neil was born on 14th July 1920 in Bootle, Lancashire. Tom Neil (also to become known in the RAF as 'Ginger') joined the RAFVR in October 1938 and began his flying training at 17 E and RFTS, Barton, Manchester. Tom Neil was called up on the 2nd os September 1939 being sent to 4 ITW, Bexhill in early November. On 1st December 1939, he was posted to 8 FTS and on completion of the course he was commissioned and posted to 249 Squadron in May 1940 flying Hurricanes just before the start of the Battle of Britain flying from North Weald. On 7th September 1940, Tom Neil encountered and claimed a Bf109 destroyed. On the 11th an He111, on the 15th two Bf109s and a Do17 destroyed and another Do17 shared, on the 18th an He111 damaged and on the 27th a Bf110 and a Ju88 destroyed, a Bf110 probably destroyed and a Ju88 shared. On 6th October Tom Neil shared a Do17, on the 25th claimed a Bf109 destroyed, on the 27th a Do17 probably destroyed, on the 28th a Ju88 shared and on 7th November a Ju87 and two Bf109s destroyed. He was awarded a DFC on 8 October, but on 7 November, after claiming 3 victories over the North Sea off the Essex coast, he collided in mid-air with Wing Commander Francis Beamish and his aircraft lost its tail. He baled out of his Hurricane unhurt, Beamish force-landing unscathed. Tom received a Bar to his DFC on 26 November, and on 13 December was promoted flight Commander. The squadron was posted to Malta in May 1941, flying off HMS Ark Royal on the 21st. During a summer of frequent scrambles, he claimed one further victory in June, while on 7th October he led a fighter-bomber attack on Gela station, Sicily. He departed the island in December 1941, returning to the UK via the Middle East, South and West Africa, and Canada, finally arriving in March 1942, when he became tactics officer with 81 Group. A spell as an instructor at 56 OTU, before being posted as a flying liaison officer with the 100th Fighter Wing of the US 9th Air Force in January 1944. He managed to get some flying in over France with this unit, claiming a share in 6 aircraft destroyed on the ground before D-Day, and a dozen or so more later, plus a number of other ground targets. In January 1945 he was sent to the school of Land/Air Warfare as an instructor. In March 1945 he was posted out to Burma, where he undertook some operations with 1 Wing, Indian Air Force, to gain experience of the operations in this area. Returning to the UK in April, he resumed instructing at the school until the end of the year. In January 1946 he attended the Empire Test Pilots School, undertaking No.4 short course and No.5 course, a total of 18 months. Posted briefly to Farnborough, he sought a move to Boscombe Down, where he stayed for some 3 years. In 1948 in went to Wright-Patterson AFB, Dayton, Ohio, to take part in the first high altitude pressure suit experiments, as a precursor to the aerospace programme. 1950-51 he was a staff officer at HQ, Fighter Command, while in 1952 he attended the staff college at Bracknell. He was then given command of 208 Squadron in Egypt, which he led until 1956, leaving just before the Suez operation. He returned to the UK to become W/Cdr Operations, Metropolitan sector, until 1958, when he attended the flying college at Manby. He went to the British Embassy in Washington for 3 years from 1959, returning to the Ministry of Defence but retiring from the service as a Wing Commander in 1964. Meanwhile he had added the US Bronze Star to his decorations in august 1947, and an AFC in January 1956.
Signatures on item 2
*The value given for each signature has been calculated by us based on the historical significance and rarity of the signature. Values of many pilot signatures have risen in recent years and will likely continue to rise as they become more and more rare.
NameInfo


The signature of Kurt Dahlmann

Kurt Dahlmann
*Signature Value : £55 (matted)

Kurt Dahlmann was born on the 4th of March 1918 in Konigsberg, moving to Danzig in 1925 where Dahlmann went to school. Dahlman took up flight training in 1936 at the Fliegerübungsstelle (flight training center) at Marienburg in Elbing. Following obligatory service in the Reichsarbeitsdienst Dahlamnn was inducted into the Luftwaffe in November 1937 and furthered his flight training at Luftkriegsschule Wildpark-Werder, in 1939 shortly before the start of the war. Dahlmann received his commission as a Lieutenant. Dahlmann became bomber and ground attack pilot flying both Junkers Ju88 and Fw190 aircraft in that role. He participated in the Polish Campaign, the Battle of Britain, the campaign against France as well as the North African Campaign under Rommel flyign Ju88s. Dahlmann later specialized in solo night bombing attacks against specific high value targets. Some of these missions included weapons factories in Britain, British airfields, and later in the war attacking the Remagen bridge. Dahlmann was also personally assigned a specially stripped down, high speed, Fw190 for target marking, pathfinding, missions. He flew over 350 combat missions between September 1940 and 5 May 1945 and was awarded the Knights Cross (No. 711) for flying 200 missions and subsequently the Oak leaves for having successfully completed 300 combat missions becoming the highest decorated German Jabo pilot of the war. Dahlmann finished the war as a Major commanding I./SKG 10, III./KG 51 and NSG 20.

1940 pilot in III./KG 30.
19.01.42 awarded the Ehrenpokal.
1942 appt Staka 9./KG 30 (to 6.43).
15.02.43 Oblt., awarded DKG for prior service in III./KG 30.
11.05.43 Oblt. in III./KG 30, ordered to RLM (Gen.d.Kampfflieger – L.In.2) for temporary duty (to 11.06.43).
11.06.43 appt. Staka 1./SKG 10 (or 2./SKG 10?).
01.10.43 Oblt., appt Kdr. I./SKG 10 (to 20.10.44).
01.04.44 promo to Hptm.
01.06.44 promo to Maj.
11.06.44 Hptm., awarded Ritterkreuz, Kdr. I./SKG 10.
20.10.44 appt Kdr. III./KG 51.
31.10.44 appt Kdr. NSGr. 20 (to 08.05.45).
24.01.45 Maj., awarded the Eichenlaub (No. 711), NSGr. 20.
Settled in South Africa after the war.


The signature of Wing Commander John Freeborn DFC* (deceased)

Wing Commander John Freeborn DFC* (deceased)
*Signature Value : £60 (matted)

Wing Commnader John. C. Freeborn was born on the 1st of December 1919 in Middleton, Yorkshire. John left grammar school at 16 and joined the RAF in 1938, where he made 14 shillings a week and shot pheasant in his spare time. He later visited his classmates after flight school by landing his plane on a nearby cricket pitch. In March 1938 John Freeborn was commissioned in the RAFO, and on the 9th of April 1938 went to Montrose and joined 8 FTS, where he completed his training before going to 74 "Tiger" Squadron at Hornchurch on 29th October. He relinquished his RAFO commission on being granted a short service one in the RAF in January 1939. Johnie Freeborn flew Spitfires with 74 Squadron over Dunkirk, and claimed a probable Ju 88 on May 21st 1940. On the 22nd of May 1940 he destroyed a Junkers 88, and a probable Bf 109 on the 24th of May followed soon after on the 27th by a Bf 109 destroyed and another probably destroyed. On one occasion his Spitfire was badly damaged over Dunkirk and he crash-landed on the beach near Calais but managed to get a lift home in a returning aircraft. His squadron flew relentlessly during the Battle of Britain. In one eight-hour period, its pilots flew into combat four times, destroying 23 enemy aircraft (three by John Freeborn) and damaging 14 more. Five kills denoted an Ace and by the end of the Battle of Britain, John had seven to his credit and won the DFC. John claimed a Bf 109 destroyed on 10th July, shared a probable Dornier 17 on the 24th, shot down a Bf 109 on the 28th, destroyed two Bf 110s, a Bf 109 and probably another on 11th August, destroyed a Do 17 on the 13th, destroyed another on 11th September and damaged an He 111 on the 14th. Freeborn was made a Flight Commander on 28th August. He shared a Bf 109 on 17th November, shot down two Bf 109s, shared another and damaged a fourth on 5th December, and damaged a Dornier 17 on 5th February and 4th March 1941. John Freeborn had been with his squadron longer, and flown more hours, than any other Battle of Britain pilot and on the 25th of February 1941 John freeborn was awarded a Bar to the DFC. In January, 1942 John Freeborn was posted to Army Air Force Base in Selma, Alababma which was home to the South East Training Command in America. After two months as RAF liaison officer he went to Eglin Field, Florida where he helped in testing various aircraft, including the new fighters the Thunderbolt and P-51 Mustang. He returned to the UK in December 1942 and went to Harrowbear, Exeter, and then to Bolt Head as Station Commander. John Freeborn joined 602 Squadron in 1942, and commanded 118 Squadron in June 1943 at Coltishall, leading it until January 1944. In June 1944 he was promoted Wing Commander (the youngest Wing Commander in the RAF) of 286 Wing in Italy. John Freeborn scored 17 victories and left the Royal Air Force in 1946. Sadly, we have learned that John Freeborn passed away on 28th August 2010. John Freeborn was truly one of the great Fighter Pilots of world war two and his autograph is certainly a major additon to any signature collection, as he did not sign a great deal of art pieces.
Signatures on item 3
*The value given for each signature has been calculated by us based on the historical significance and rarity of the signature. Values of many pilot signatures have risen in recent years and will likely continue to rise as they become more and more rare.
NameInfo


The signature of Group Captain Billy Drake DSO DFC* (deceased)

Group Captain Billy Drake DSO DFC* (deceased)
*Signature Value : £45 (matted)

Joined the R.A.F. in 1936. His first posting was to 1 squadron flying Furies then Hurricanes and first saw action over France in the Spring of 1940 and was awarded his first DFC by the end of the year. As a Squadron Leader he was sent to West Africa to command 128 Squadron. 1942 saw his commanding 112 squadron in North Africa, in July saw an immediate BAR to his DFC and in December an immediate DSO. Posted to Malta as Wing Commander he won a US DFC in 1943. Back in the UK he now was flying Typhoons in the lead up to D-Day. With Pete Brothers he was sent to the States to attend the US Staff School at Fort Leavenworth. After the war he continued in the R.A.F. serving in Japan, Malaya, Singapore, Switzerland and his final posting as Group Captain RAF Chivenor, Devon. Retired in July 1963. Going to Portugal where he ran a Bar and Restaurant and dealing in Real Estate. In his flying career he accounted for more than 24 enemy aircraft. Sadly, Billy Drake passed away on 28th August 2011.
Signatures on item 4
*The value given for each signature has been calculated by us based on the historical significance and rarity of the signature. Values of many pilot signatures have risen in recent years and will likely continue to rise as they become more and more rare.
NameInfo


The signature of General Walter Krupinski (deceased)

General Walter Krupinski (deceased)
*Signature Value : £65 (matted)

Walter Krupinski first saw combat against the RAF on the Western Front. Transferring to the east, he became a Squadron Commander in the legendary JG52. In 1943 his victories reached 150 but, in March 1944 with 177 victories to his name, he was transferred to Germany to command JG11. Flying high altitude Me109s, he chalked up another 12 victories before being wounded. In September 1944 he was promoted Kommandeur of III./JG26 and led them on Operation Bodenplatte before joining Galland's famous JV44. He completed the war with 197 victories in over 1100 missions.

Walter Krupinski, known as Graf Punski or Count Punski in the Jagdwaffe, was a swashbuckling fly-boy with a phenomenal record of 197 aerial victories. Krupinski not only never lost a wingman, but also had the ability to help beginners develop to their full potential. He joined the Luftwaffe in 1939 as a student in the 11th Flying Training Regiment. He first served with the Jagderganzungsgruppe JG52, a combat replacement unit, flying the Me109, in October 1940. By the end of 191, he had earned the Iron Cross 1st class after his seventh victory and was awarded the German Cross in Gold and the Knights Cross one year later after scoring over 52 aerial victories. Krupinski taught the aerial art of closing with the enemy aircraft until it filled the windscreen before firing. It was during this time that the young Erich Hartmann was assigned as Krupinskis wingman. The young and overly enthusiastic Hartmann was seriously struggling in his first attempts at aerial combat, resulting in severe reprimands by the group commander. However, under Krupinskis expert tutelage, Hartmann mastered the art of aerial combat and went on to become the top scoring fighter ace in the world with 352 victories. While still a first lieutenant, Krupinski was selected as Dquadron Commander of 7.JG52 in the spring of 1943. On 5th of July of the same year, he scored victories 80 to 90 - 11 in one day! He later transferred to the Reich Defence in the west with 1./JG5 in the spring of 1944. His units mission was to help halt the Allied strategic bombardment campaign against Germany. Krupinski continued to rack up aerial victories and was awarded Oak Leaves to the Knights Cross after his 177th victory. He was promoted to Captain and became Group Commander of II./JG 11. Later, Krupinski became Group Commander of II./JG 26 Schlageter Group. In March 1945 he joined General Adolf Gallands famed Jagdverband 44 and flew Messerschmitt Me262 jet fighters until the end of the war. After logging a total of 1,100 combat missions, Krupinski was officialy credited with 197 aerial victories. Krupinski was also wounded seven times in aerial combat and received the Verwundetenabzeichen in Gold - the German equivalent of the American Purple Heart. A civilian after the war, Krupinski later joined the new Luftwaffe in 1952 and was promoted to major in 1955. He received jet fighting training from the Royal Air Force and became the first commander of the Jagdbomber Geschwader, Fighter-Bomber Wing - 33. Krupinski flew various jet fighters in the German Air Force, but held dear the last aircraft he flew until his retirement, his beloved F-104G Starfighter. General Krupinski retired as Commander of the German Air Force Tactical Air Command in 1976.

He received the Knight's Cross with Oak Leaves. He died 7th October 2000.


The signature of Hauptmann Ernst Wilhelm Reinert (deceased)

Hauptmann Ernst Wilhelm Reinert (deceased)
*Signature Value : £60 (matted)

Ernst Wilhelm Reinert flew with JG77, before transferring to the Eastern Front in 1941. He was posted to Tunisia in January 1943 where he became the most successful Luftwaffe Ace in North Africa during that period. On January 2nd 1945 he was given the leadership of IV./JG27. In March he transferred to III./JG7 flying the Me262. In his 715 missions Reinert scored 174 aerial victories. he was awarded the Knight's Cross with Oak Leaves and Swords. Born 2nd February 1919 in Lindenthal, died 5th September 2007.


The signature of Leutnant Fritz Tegtmeier (deceased)

Leutnant Fritz Tegtmeier (deceased)
*Signature Value : £55 (matted)

Born in 1917 he joined 2/JG-54 in October 1940, but after being injured in a crash it wasn't until 1941 that he achieved his first victory. A brief time as a fighter Instructor in 1943 he returned to the Russian Front and his score soon started to mount, By May 1944 he had over 100 victories. August 1944 saw his appointment as Staffelkapitan of 3/JG-54. In March 1945 he transferred to JG-7 flying Me262 Jet. By the end of the war he had flown 700 combat missions and had 146 victories. He was awarded the Knights Cross. Fritz Tegtmeier died on 8th April 1999 aged 81.


The signature of Major Erich Rudorffer

Major Erich Rudorffer
*Signature Value : £50 (matted)

Erich Rudorffer was born on November 1st 1917 in the town of Zwickau in Saxony. Erich Rudorffer joined the Luftwaffes I./JG2 Richthofen in November 1939, and was soon flying combat patrols in January 1940 and was assigned to I/JG 2 Richthofen with the rank of Oberfeldwebel. He took part in the Battle of France, scoring the first of his many victories over a French Hawk 75 on May 14th, 1940. He went on to score eight additional victories during the Battle of France and the Battle of Britain. Rudorffer recalled an incident in August 1940 when he escorted a badly damaged Hurricane across the Channel - ditching in the English Channel was greatly feared by pilots on both sides. As fate often does, Rudorffer found the roles reversed two weeks later, when he was escorted by an RAF fighter after receiving battle damage. By May 1st 1941 Rudorffer had achieved 19 victories, which led to the award of the Knights Cross. In June 1941 Rodorffer became an Adjutant of II./JG2. In 1942 Rudorffer participated in Operation Cerberus (known as the Channel Dash) and flew over the Allied landings at Dieppe. Erich Rudorffer along with JG2 was transferred to North Africa in December 1942. It was in North Africa that Rudorffer showed his propensity for multiple-victory sorties. He shot down eight British aircraft in 32 minutes on February 9th 1943 and seven more in 20 minutes six days later. After scoring a total of 26 victories in Tunisia, Rudorffer returned to France in April 1943 and was posted to command II./JG54 in Russia, after Hauptmann Heinrich Jung, its Kommodore, failed to return from a mission on July 30th 1943. On August 24th 1943 he shot down 5 Russian aircraft on the first mission of the day and followed that up with three more victories on the second mission. He scored seven victories in seven minutes on October 11th but his finest achievement occurred on November 6th when in the course of 17 minutes, he shot down thirteen Russian aircraft. Rudorffer became known to Russian pilots as the fighter of Libau. On October 28th 1944 while about to land, Rudorffer spotted a large formation of Il-2 Sturmoviks. He quickly aborted the landing and moved to engage the Russian aircraft. In under ten minutes, nine of the of the II-2 Sturmoviks were shot down causing the rest to disperse. Rudorffer would later that day go on and shoot down a further two Russian aircraft. These victories took his total to 113 and he was awarded the Oak Leaves on April 11th 1944. Rudorffer would on the 26th January 1945 on his 210th victory receive the addition of the Swords. In February 1945 Rudorffer took command of I./JG7 flying the Me262. He was one of the first jet fighter aces of the war, scoring 12 victories in the Me262. He shot down ten 4-engine bombers during the "Defense of the Reich missions". He was the master of multiple scoring - achieving more multiple victories than any other pilot. Erich Rudorffer never took leave, was shot down 16 times having to bail out 9 times, and ended the war with 222 victories from over 1000 missions. He was awarded the Knights Cross, with Oak Leaves and Swords.


The signature of Major Gerhard Schopfel (deceased)

Major Gerhard Schopfel (deceased)
*Signature Value : £50 (matted)

Gerhard Schopfel was Staffelkapitan of 9./JG26 at the outbreak of war, and became Kommandeur of III./JG26 in August 1940. In December 1941 he succeeded Adolf Galland as Kommodore of JG26 until Januray 1943. Later, Kommodore of JG4 and JG6. He flew over 700 combat missions, achieving 40 victories, all in the West. He was awarded the Knight's Cross in 1940. Died 17th May 2003.


The signature of Major Heinz Lange (deceased)

Major Heinz Lange (deceased)
*Signature Value : £15 (matted)

At the outbreak of war Heinz Lange was with I./JG21 scoring his first victory in October 1939. He flew 76 missions in the Battle of Britain with 8./JG54, and never lost a wingman. After flying in the Balkan campaign he took part in the invasion of Russia, scoring 7 victories during the first week. In October 1941 he was given command of 1./JG54 and in 1942 command of 3./JG51. In January 1944 Heinz Lange returned to JG54 to command 1.Gruppe and then back to JG51 where he was appointed Kommodore of JG51 Molders, leading IV./JG51 at the same time. Heinz Lange flew over 628 missions and achieved 70 victories. He was awarded the Knight's Cross. Born 2nd October 1917, died 26th February 2006.


The signature of Oberfeldwebel Heinz Marquardt (deceased)

Oberfeldwebel Heinz Marquardt (deceased)
*Signature Value : £50 (matted)

In late 1941 Heinz Marquardt was with a training squadron south of Paris. In August 1943 he was posted to join IV./JG51 in Russia, achieving his first victory two months later. Shot down eight times, he once achieved twelve victories in a single day. Awarded the Knight's Cross in November 1944, he flew a total of 320 missions, and scored 121 victories. Sadly, Heinz Marquardt died 19th December 2003, aged 80.


The signature of Oberleutenant Peter Düttmann (deceased)

Oberleutenant Peter Düttmann (deceased)
*Signature Value : £50 (matted)

Peter Düttman joined 5/JG-52 in the spring of 1943 and served with that unit until the end of the war when he was a Staffelkapitan. During those two years on the Russian Front Peter flew 395 missions, had 152 victories, including nine in one day, was shot down or crash landed 17 times but was never wounded. His decorations include the Knights Cross and towards the end of the war was recommended for Oak Leaves. Sadly, Peter Duttmann passed away on 9th January 2001. As far as we are aware Peter Duttmann did not sign many art prints, making his signature very rare and highly collectable, escpecially with his high number of victories, making him the 34th highest scoring German Ace of the war.
Signatures on item 5
*The value given for each signature has been calculated by us based on the historical significance and rarity of the signature. Values of many pilot signatures have risen in recent years and will likely continue to rise as they become more and more rare.
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The signature of Group Captain Byron Duckenfield AFC (deceased)

Group Captain Byron Duckenfield AFC (deceased)
*Signature Value : £40 (matted)

Byron Duckenfield started at Flying Training School on 25th November 1935 in a Blackburn B2 at Brough. As a Sergeant, he joined No.32 Sqn at Biggin Hill on 8th August 1936 and flew Gauntlets and Hurricanes. He joined 74 Squadron at Hornchurch on 11th April 1940, flying Spitfires, and on 5th May was posted to 501 Squadron flying Hurricanes at Tangmere. On the 11th of May at Betheniville, he survived a crash in a passenger transport Bombay aircraft in an aircraft in which he was a passenger, While comin ginto land the aircraft at 200 feet the aircraft stalled and the aircrfat fell backwards just levelly out as it histhe ground. 5 of th epassengers were killed when the centre section collapsed and crushed them. Duckenfield was fortunate as he had moved position during the flight. as the two passengers sitting each side of where he was sitting had died in the crash. (it was found later that the Bombay had beeb loaded with to much weight in the aft sectiion. ) recovering in hospital in Roehampton. On 23rd July 1940, he rejoined No.501 Sqn at Middle Wallop, then moved to to Gravesend two days later, scoring his first victory, a Ju87, on the 29th of July 1940. During August and September he scored three more victories. After a spell as a test pilot from 14th September 1940, he was posted to command 66 Squadron on 20th December 1941, flying Spitfires. On 26th February 1942 he took command of 615 Squadron flying Hurricanes from Fairwood Common, taking the squadron to the Far East. In late December 1942 he was shot down in Burma and captured by the Japanese. He remained a POW until release in May 1945. After a refresher course at the Flying Training School in November 1949, he took command of No.19 Squadron flying Hornets and Meteors from Chruch Fenton. After a series of staff positions, he retired from the RAF as a Group Captain on 28th May 1969. Duckenfield would write later his details :

Burma

At first light, 12 Hurricanes IIC aircraft of 615 Squadron, myself in the lead, took off from Chittagong for central Burma to attack the Japanese air base at Magwe, 300 miles away on the banks of the River Irrawaddy. Arriving at Yenangyaung, we turned downstream at minimum height for Magwe, 30 miles to the South and jettisoned drop tanks. Just before sighting the enemy base, the squadron climbed to 1200 feet and positioned to attack from up sun. On the ramp at the base, in front of the hangers, were 10 or 12 Nakajima KI - 43 Oscars in a rough line up (not dispersed) perhaps readying for take. These aircraft and the hangars behind them were attacked in a single pass, before withdrawing westward at low level and maximum speed. A few minutes later perhaps 20 miles away form Magwe, I was following the line of a cheung (small creek), height about 250 feet, speed aboput 280 mph, when the aircraft gave a violent shudder, accompanied by a very lound, unusual noise. The cause was instantly apparent: the airscrew has disappeared completely, leaving only the spinning hub. My immediate reaction was to throttle back fully and switch off to stop the violently overspeeding engine. Further action was obvious: I was committed to staying with the aircraft because, with a high initial speed, not enough height to eject could be gained without the help of an airscrew. So I jettisoned the canopy and acknowledged gratefully the fact that I was following a creek; the banks of either side were hillocky ground, hostile to a forced landing aircraft. Flying the course of the creek, I soon found the aircraft to be near the stall (luckily, a lower than normal figure without an airscrew) extended the flaps and touched down wheels-up with minimum impact ( I have done worse landings on a smooth runway!) My luck was holding, if one can talk of luck in such a situation. December is the height of the dry season in that area and the creek had little water, it was shallow and narrow at the point where I came down: shallow enough to support the fusalage and narrow enough to support wing tips. So I released the harness, pushed the IFF Destruct switch, climed out and walked the wing ashore, dryshod. The question may occur -Why did not others in the squadron see their leader go down? - the answer is simple, the usual tatctic of withdrawal from an enemy target was to fly single at high speed and low level on parallel courses until a safe distance from target was attained. Then, the formation would climb to re-assemble. Having left the aircraft, I now faced a formidable escape problem? I was 300 miles from friendly territory: my desired route would be westward but 80% of that 300 miles was covered by steep north-south ridges impenetrably clothed in virgin jungle; these were natural impediments, there was also the enemy to consider. Having thought over my predicament, I decided the best I could do - having heard reports of mean herted plainspeope - was to get as far into the hills as possible and then find a (hopefully sympathetic) village. I suppose I may have covered about 15 miles by nightfall when I came upon this small hill village and walked into the village square. Nobody seemed surprised to see me (I suspect I had been followed for some time) I wa given a quiet welcome, seated at a table in the open and given food. Then exhaustion took over, I fell asleep in the chair and woke later to find myself tied up in it. Next day I was handed over to a Japanese sergeant and escort who took me back to Magwe and, soon after that, 2.5 years captivity in Rangoon jail.

Sadly we have learned that Byron Duckenfield passed away on 19th November 2010.

This Week's Half Price Art

The first fight for independence of the American Revolution. The Battle of Lexington, known as Lexington Common, is where the opening shots of the American Revolution of 1775 took place. The Common had been purchased by subscription of some of the towns leading citizens in 1711.  The engagement took place oon April 19th 1775.  Lt Col Francis Smith wiith 700 men under his command was given secret orders to capture and destroy military supplies that were reportedly stored by the Massachusetts militia at Concord. But Patriot colonials had received word weeks before the expedition that their supplies might be at risk, and had moved the supplies to other stores.  They were also given word that the British were on their way and a rapid deployment of the militia was undertaken. The first shots were fired just as the sun was rising at Lexington. The Minutemen were outnumbered and withdrew, as the British proceeded on to Concord. At the North Bridge in Concord they were meet by a force of several hundred militiamen who defeated the British three companies of the Kings troops, who withdrew  More Minutemen arrived soon thereafter and inflicted heavy damage on the regulars as they marched back towards Boston. Upon returning to Lexington, Smiths expedition was rescued by reinforcements.  The whole British force of some 1700 men withdrew back to Boston.

Battle of Lexington by William Barnes Wollen. (Y)
Half Price! - £30.00
  Trapped within a rapidly decreasing perimeter, the exhausted BEF along with elements of the French 1st Army appeared to be at the mercy of the mighty Luftwaffe.  No one though had reckoned on the brilliant leadership of Admiral Ramsay nor the gallant and unstinting efforts of the military and civilians who managed to rescue over 330,000 troops in nine days.

Operation Dynamo, Dunkirk, France 24th May - 4th June 1940 by David Pentland. (GL)
Half Price! - £300.00
 Renault FT 17 baby tanks of the recently formed US 304th tank brigade commanded by the young Lt. Col George S. Patton Jnr. are employed for the first time during the allied assault on the St Mihiel Salient. Leading the 344th battalion in person Patton and his tanks help the infantry divisions push the enemy back to the Hindenberg line in only 4 days.

Baptism of Fire - St Mihiel Salient, 12th – 15th September 1918 by David Pentland. (GS)
Half Price! - £250.00
 Depicting soldiers of the French Second Empire dreaming of the victorious French Army of the Napoleonic period.
La Reve (The Dream) by Edouard Detaille. (Y)
Half Price! - £30.00

 Captain Montague Lind, leading a Squadron of the 1st Life Guards against the 12th regiment of Cuirassiers during the battle of waterloo, Hougoumont Farm can be seen in the distance.

Charge of the Life Guards by Mark Churms. (P)
Half Price! - £5000.00
 Sous-Lieutenant Ferdinand de la Riloisiere of 1st Regiment of Carabiniers, moments before he received a mortal wound, in the charge of the 2nd reserve cavalry Corps, against the reavski Redoubt. Despite his injury he survived for several days after the battle and was presented with the cross of the Legion of Honour only hours before his death.

La Moscowa, The Battle of Borodino, 7th September 1812 by Mark Churms. (B)
Half Price! - £40.00
The story of the SAS through all major theatres they were involved in. From the start, North Africa 1941, Malaya 1952-1956, Borneo1965-1966, Aden 1967, Oman 1971-1976, Iranian Embassy 1980, Falklands Conflict 1982, Iraq 1991. The middle area shows Col. D. Stirling DSO, and the four single figures depict the different section, Boat, Mountain, Air and Mobility.

The SAS Full Circle by Graeme Lothian. (P)
Half Price! - £2500.00
 Unterscharfurher Karl-Heinz Turk of the Schwere SS Panzerabteilung 503, in one of the units few remaining Kingtigers, defends the Potsdammer Platz along with elements of the Munchberg Division against the rapidly encroaching Soviet forces.

The Last Battle, Berlin, April 30th 1945 by David Pentland. (GL)
Half Price! - £300.00
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