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The One That Broke The Dam by Ivan Berryman. (B)


The One That Broke The Dam by Ivan Berryman. (B)

Amid a hail of defensive fire, Flt Lt D J H Maltby holds Lancaster ED906/G AJ-J steady for his bomb aimer John Fort to perfectly choose his moment to release the Upkeep Bomb that would ultimately breach and destroy the Mohne Dam during the famous Dambuster raids on the Ruhr on the night of 16th / 17th May 1943. Signed by four pilots and / or crew.
Item Code : B0314BThe One That Broke The Dam by Ivan Berryman. (B) - This Edition
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PRINT Presentation edition of 20 prints.

Image size 12 inches x 9 inches (31cm x 23cm) Artist : Ivan Berryman£250.00

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Other editions of this item : The One That Broke The Dam by Ivan Berryman.B0314
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PRINTSigned limited edition of 1150 prints. Image size 12 inches x 9 inches (31cm x 23cm)Artist : Ivan Berryman£25 Off!Now : £25.00
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Limited edition of 100 artist proofs. Image size 12 inches x 9 inches (31cm x 23cm) Lucas, Kenneth
+ Artist : Ivan Berryman


Signature(s) value alone : £30
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PRINT Lucas signature edition of 200 prints (Nos. 1 - 200) from the signed limited edition of 1150 prints. Image size 12 inches x 9 inches (31cm x 23cm) Lucas, Kenneth
+ Artist : Ivan Berryman


Signature(s) value alone : £30
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Limited edition of 10 giclee canvas prints. Size 18 inches x 13 inches (46cm x 33cm)Artist : Ivan Berryman
on separate certificate
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Original acrylic painting by Ivan Berryman.

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Size 13 inches x 9 inches (33cm x 23cm)Artist : Ivan BerrymanSOLD
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**Signed limited edition of 1150 prints. (One print reduced to clear)

Ex-display prints with light border damage.
Image size 12 inches x 9 inches (31cm x 23cm)Artist : Ivan Berryman£15 Off!Now : £35.00VIEW EDITION...
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Extra Details : The One That Broke The Dam by Ivan Berryman. (B)
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The Aircraft :
NameInfo
LancasterThe Avro Lancaster arose from the avro Manchester and the first prototype Lancaster was a converted Manchester with four engines. The Lancaster was first flown in January 1941, and started operations in March 1942. By March 1945 The Royal Air Force had 56 squadrons of Lancasters with the first squadron equipped being No.44 Squadron. During World War Two the Avro Lancaster flew 156,000 sorties and dropped 618,378 tonnes of bombs between 1942 and 1945. Lancaster Bomberss took part in the devastating round-the-clock raids on Hamburg during Air Marshall Harris' "Operation Gomorrah" in July 1943. Just 35 Lancasters completed more than 100 successful operations each, and 3,249 were lost in action. The most successful survivor completed 139 operations, and the Lancaster was scrapped after the war in 1947. A few Lancasters were converted into tankers and the two tanker aircraft were joined by another converted Lancaster and were used in the Berlin Airlift, achieving 757 tanker sorties. A famous Lancaster bombing raid was the 1943 mission, codenamed Operation Chastise, to destroy the dams of the Ruhr Valley. The operation was carried out by 617 Squadron in modified Mk IIIs carrying special drum shaped bouncing bombs designed by Barnes Wallis. Also famous was a series of Lancaster attacks using Tallboy bombs against the German battleship Tirpitz, which first disabled and later sank the ship. The Lancaster bomber was the basis of the new Avro Lincoln bomber, initially known as the Lancaster IV and Lancaster V. (Becoming Lincoln B1 and B2 respectively.) Their Lancastrian airliner was also based on the Lancaster but was not very successful. Other developments were the Avro York and the successful Shackleton which continued in airborne early warning service up to 1992.
Artist Details : Ivan Berryman
Click here for a full list of all artwork by Ivan Berryman


Ivan Berryman

Over the last 30 years, Ivan Berryman has become a leading aviation, motor racing and naval artist. In this time, the subjects of his paintings have been wide and varied as he has deliberately strived to include some of the lesser know aircraft, ships and events in his portfolio, which includes aircraft like the Defiant, TSR2, Beaufort, ships including MTBs and corvettes, and around 100 different aircraft of the first world war. In addition to this he has taken new approaches to the classic subjects of his field, including the Dambuster Lancasters, Battle of Britain Spitfires, Bf109s and Hurricanes, HMS Hood, Bismarck and the best known naval ships, as well as some iconic sporting moments. In his own words : Art and aviation have been like a brother and sister to me. We have grown up together, learned together and made our adult lives together. But you do not have to have an appreciation of aircraft to admire the graceful lines of a Spitfire or the functional simplicity of a Focke-Wulf 190. They are themselves a work of art and they cry out to be painted - not as machines of war and destruction, but as objects of beauty, born of necessity and function, yet given a life and iconic classicism beyond their original calling. My interest and love of art and aircraft was gifted to me by my father, a designer and aeronautical engineer of considerable repute. Denis Berryman C.Eng. FRAeS. He gave me his eyes, his passion, his dedication and his unwavering professionalism. I owe him everything. And I miss him terribly. A love of art and of beautiful and interesting things takes you on a journey. You discover new interests, new fascinations, and you want to paint them. You want to paint them in their environment, in their element. Whether it is an aeroplane, a warship, a racing car or a beautiful woman, their gift to an artist is the same: Their lines, their texture and the way that light and shadows give them form. These are the food and oxygen of an artist. Not the paint and the canvas. These are mere tools. The secret is in the passion and the perception...





Ivan with some of his original paintings in the originals gallery at Cranston Fine Arts and in his studio.

More about Ivan Berryman

This Week's Half Price Art

 Even the most faithful of Messerschmitt Me 109 pilots that also flew the Focke-Wulf Fw190 grudgingly admitted the well-proportioned and aesthetically pleasing Fw190 was the finest single-seat fighter in the Luftwaffes armoury during World War II. Soon after its arrival on the Channel Front in 1941, when initial bugs were ironed out, this superb fighter came close to fighter design perfection by the standards of the day. Just as the Mk IX Spitfire held the mantle as Britains most outstanding combat fighter of the war, so was the Fw190 regarded by experienced Luftwaffe pilots. Within months of its operational debut the Fw190 was causing widespread consternation among RAF pilots, the new fighter equal to the Mk IX Spitfire in all but its ability in the tightest of turning circles. By 1944 the technically superb Fw190 came into its own in the great air battles against the USAAFs massed daylight raids. The defence of the Reichs western airspace rested on the shoulders of a few Jagdgschwarden who, against steadily increasing odds, were tasked with interception and destruction of the attacking American heavy bombers. Flying alongside the two established Channel fighter wings JG2 Richthofen and JG26 Schlageter, equipped with Fw190s and led by the great fighter ace Oberst Walter Oesau, JG1 joined the battle in defence of northern Germany. Nicolas Trudgians painting Storm Chasers depicts the Fw190As of I./JG1, distinguished by their distinctive black and white striped cowls, scrambling from the snow-covered Dortmund airfield on 10 February 1944 to intercept another inbound American daylight raid. Nicks dramatic view of this technically supreme fighter conveys its true class as it hurtles over the airfield, its undercarriage retracting as the Fw190 accelerates into the climb. Below, sharing the airfield with I./JGI, are the Fw190s of the newly formed Sturmstaffel 1, identified by their black-white-black tail bands, seen taxiing out to join in the interception. Despite bad weather conditions the Luftwaffes defending fighters scored heavily that day, inflicting severe losses on the Americans, claiming 29 bombers and 8 fighters shot down in the action.

Storm Chasers by Nicolas Trudgian. (Y)
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 Depicting the No.19 Sqn Spitfire Mk.IIA of Flt Lt Walter Lawson attacking a Bf.109 E-4 of JG.3 in the Summer of 1940. The final tally of Lawson before he was listed as missing in August 1941 was 6 confirmed, 1 shared, 3 probables and 1 damaged.  The Bf.109 shown here was flown by Oberleutnant Franz von Werra. He survived this encounter, but was shot down over Kent in September 1940.

Flt Lt Walter Lawson by Ivan Berryman. (GL)
Half Price! - £300.00
 Army Air Corps Lynx Mk.9A helicopters sitting on the flight line at Camp Bastion, waiting to be tasked.

Lynx at Readiness - Bastion by Graeme Lothian. (GL)
Half Price! - £300.00
 One of Frances most venerated pilots in World War 1 was Capitaine Georges Guynemer whose final victory tally has never been fully established, although he has been officially credited with 53 kills. It is more likely, however, that his actual total was nearer to 88! He is shown here in his Spad S.VII having just claimed his 31st victim, a Gotha bomber.

Capitaine Georges Guynemer by Ivan Berryman. (GL)
Half Price! - £300.00

 Maurice <i>Peter</i> Brown damages a Dornier Do.17 in his 41 Squadron Spitfire on 30th September 1940.

Dorniers Demise by Ivan Berryman.
Half Price! - £45.00
 Serving in a huge variety of roles throughout WW2, the Dornier Do.17's origins lay in a design for a high speed mail plane capable of carrying six passengers.  Numerous developments saw it mature into one of the world's most iconic bombers, typified here by these three Do.17Z-2s of 1 Gruppe, KG 2, based at Tatoi in Greece during 1941.

The Ubiquitous Raider - Dornier Do.17s of 1 Gruppe KG2 by Ivan Berryman. (GS)
Half Price! - £250.00
1st June 1940 - <i>Pete</i> Peters fights off an overwhelming attack over Dunkirk and destroys three fighters.  Anson MKV flown by pilot officer Phillip Peters was leading a patrol of three Ansons of No.500 Royal Auxiliary Air Force Squadron over Dunkirk at the time the British Expeditionary Force was evacuating from the beaches.  He was flying at around 50ft when his mid upper gunner reported that nine Bf109s were attacking. Dropping to wave-top height the slow obsolescent twin engined aircraft tried to shake off their pursuers.  Two planes were severely damaged and Peters sent them home, leaving his own aircraft at the mercy of the enemy fighters.  It was at this point that Peters was grateful for his 'secret weapons'.  In addition to the Anson's nose gun and mid upper turret, guns had been fitted projecting out of the sides of the aircraft's long 'greenhouse' cabin. The extra guns were manned by the co-pilot and wireless operator. By throttling back and executing a number of skid turns Peters was able to out manoeuvre the enemy and allow his crew to fire on the attackers.  The first Bf109 was finished off with the nose gun as it did a stall turn in front off the aircraft. The second was shot down into the sea.  A third attacker sustained heavy damage and turned tail with the other pursuers.  Peters set course for Detling.  The news of the battle went on ahead of his arrival and he was greeted by applause and cheering of the squadron personnel.  When the aircraft was inspected, only one bullet hole was found. It wasn't until later when he had his parachute repacked that another armour piercing bullet was found lodged in the silk.  For the attack and morale boosting effect for the rest of the squadron, Peters was awarded the DFC.  The remaining crew, Sergeant Spencer, Corporal Smith, Leading Aircraftsman Dillnutt and Leading Aircraftsman Cunningham all received the Distinguished Flying Medal.

Improbable Victory by Tim Fisher (P)
Half Price! - £1500.00
 Fokker DR.1 Triplane 425/17 of Manfred von Richthofen, accompanied by a Fokker. D.VII wingman, swoops from a high patrol early in 1918. 425/17 was the aircraft in which the Red Baron finally met his end in April of that year, no fewer than 17 of his victories having been scored in his red-painted triplane.

Final Days by Ivan Berryman. (P)
Half Price! - £425.00
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