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Testing Times by Michael Rondot. (Y)


Testing Times by Michael Rondot. (Y)

Of all the big piston-engined navy fighters built after WWll, the Hawker Sea Fury was the greatest.Rugged, powerful and fast, the formidable Sea Fury achieved fame over Korea in both fighter and ground attack roles and was the last of the line of piston-engined Fleet Air Arm fighters.
Item Code : MR0043YTesting Times by Michael Rondot. (Y) - This Edition
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EX-DISPLAY
PRINT
**Signed limited edition of 500 prints. (One copy reduced to clear)

Near perfect condition with some slight scratches on the image.
Paper size 25 inches x 19 inches (64cm x 48cm)Artist : Michael RondotHalf
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Other editions of this item : Testing Times by Michael Rondot.MR0043
TYPEEDITION DETAILSSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSYOUR PRICEPURCHASING
PRINTSigned limited edition of 500 prints. Paper size 25 inches x 19 inches (64cm x 48cm)Artist : Michael Rondot£5 Off!Now : £75.00VIEW EDITION...
ARTIST
PROOF
Limited edition of 50 artist proofs. Paper size 25 inches x 19 inches (64cm x 48cm)Artist : Michael Rondot£120.00VIEW EDITION...
General descriptions of types of editions :



The Aircraft :
NameInfo
Sea FurySingle engine Fighter of the Fleet Air Arm. maximum speed 460mph at 18,000 feet. maximum ceiling 35,800 feet and a range of 1040 miles. The Sea Fury was armed with four 20mm Hispano cannon in the wings and a bomb load of 2000ilb or 12 3 inch rockets under the wings. The Sea Fury was developed from the Hawker Tempest. With the Fleet Air Arm receiving their first aircraft to 807 squadron in August 1947. It continued in service until 1953, The Hawker Sea Fury was a carrier borne aircraft and most of its operational career was during the Korean War, where it was used as a ground attack aircraft. It also saw alot of aerial combat against the Mig-15 Jets. The total number of Sea Furies built was 860 aircraft.
Artist Details : Michael Rondot
Click here for a full list of all artwork by Michael Rondot


Michael Rondot

Michael Rondot is well known in the military aviation world for his distinctive style of aircraft paintings and prints which have made him one of todays most widely collected aviation artists. During his 25 year career as a pilot in the Royal Air Force he flew over 5000 hours in combat jets, including Jaguar fighter bombers during the Gulf War, bringing a unique authority to his paintings that sets them in a class of their own. His portrayals of classic combat aircraft are much sought-after by both aviators and enthusiasts alike for their realism and powerful atmospheric settings.

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