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Air Combat Paintings Volume VI by Robert Taylor.


Air Combat Paintings Volume VI by Robert Taylor.

Over seventy images of aviation art paintings by artist Robert Taylor. This 128 page book includes over 27,000 words of text and a foreword by lifelong aviation enthusiast Peter Jackson.
Item Code : DHM1867Air Combat Paintings Volume VI by Robert Taylor. - This Edition
TYPEEDITION DETAILSSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSYOUR PRICEPURCHASING
PRINTSigned limited edition of 600 hardback books with 128 pages plus matching numbered print.

USAAF Version.
Pisanos, Steve (companion print)
Nordenholtz, Gunther (companion print)
+ Artist : Robert Taylor


Signature(s) value alone : £80
£145.00

Quantity:
All prices on our website are displayed in British Pounds Sterling



Other editions of this item : Air Combat Paintings Volume VI by Robert Taylor. DHM1867
TYPEEDITION DETAILSSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSYOUR PRICEPURCHASING
ARTIST
PROOF
Signed artist proof edition of 25 hardback books with 128 pages plus matching numbered print.

USAAF Version.
Pisanos, Steve (companion print)
Nordenholtz, Gunther (companion print)
+ Artist : Robert Taylor


Signature(s) value alone : £80
£245.00VIEW EDITION...
PRINTHardback book with 128 pages.

USAAF Version.
Artist : Robert Taylor£45.00VIEW EDITION...
General descriptions of types of editions :


Extra Details :
About this edition :

Companion Print



Where the Eagles Gather
On 5 March 1944 the B-24 bombers of the 448th Bomb Group took off from England, their mission - to destroy the Luftwaffe facilities at Limoges aerodrome in western France. But waiting for them were the Bf-109s of JG2, ready to rip into the attacking force at the first opportunity. Luckily for the bomber crews they had one of the finest fighter escorts in the Mighty Eighth, Don Blakeslees 4th Fighter Group The Eagles. As a straggling B-24 comes under attack and its inner starboard engine starts to trail smoke, Steve Pisanos, one of the Fourths most deadly Aces, and fellow P-51B pilots quickly arrive on the scene to break up the attack. The Liberator now has a chance to get home.

Signatures on this item
*The value given for each signature has been calculated by us based on the historical significance and rarity of the signature. Values of many pilot signatures have risen in recent years and will likely continue to rise as they become more and more rare.
NameInfo


The signature of Colonel Steve Pisanos

Colonel Steve Pisanos
*Signature Value : £45

Born in Athens, Greece, Spiro Nicolas Steve Pisanos came to America on a tramp steamer. Arriving in New York in 1938 speaking no English, he worked in a bakery and hotels to earn money for flying lessons. Prior to Americas entry into World War II, he joined the Royal Air Force, was trained in California and England and eventually assigned to the 71st Eagle Squadron, comprised of American volunteers. Transferred to the USAAF 4th Fighter Group in September, 1942, he was commissioned a Lieutenant and became an American citizen, the first ever to become such outside the continental U.S. He became an Ace on January 1, 1944. On March 5, 1944, his P-51 crash-landed south of Le Havre, France while returning from an escort mission. He evaded the Germans for 6 months and worked with the French underground and the OSS on sabotaging missions. Following the war he served as a test pilot and in assignments with NATO and the USAF in Europe, followed by a tour in Vietnam and retirement as a Colonel in 1973.


Hauptmann Gunther Nordenholtz
*Signature Value : £35

After joining the Luftwaffe in December 1941 and training as a fighter pilot, Gunther Nordenholz joined JG11 where he flew Messerschmitt Bf-109s and Fw190s, scoring a victory over a P-51 Mustang. He flew against the heavy bombers of the US Eighth Air Force in the “Defense of the Reich”, and fought in combat against B-24s over western France during the Normandy Invasion. Posted to Bremen in late 1944, he was wounded during an air raid at his base, before being transferred to the Eastern Front. He finished the war flying the Bucker Bu181 and was captured by the British on 8 May 1944, later rejoining the new German Air Force as an instructor.
Artist Details : Robert Taylor
Click here for a full list of all artwork by Robert Taylor


Robert Taylor

The name Robert Taylor has been synonymous with aviation art over a quarter of a century. His paintings of aircraft, more than those of any other artist, have helped popularise a genre which at the start of this remarkable artist's career had little recognition in the world of fine art. When he burst upon the scene in the mid-1970s his vibrant, expansive approach to the subject was a revelation. His paintings immediately caught the imagination of enthusiasts and collectors alike . He became an instant success. As a boy, Robert seemed always to have a pencil in his hand. Aware of his natural gift from an early age, he never considered a career beyond art, and with unwavering focus, set out to achieve his goal. Leaving school at fifteen, he has never worked outside the world of art. After two years at the Bath School of Art he landed a job as an apprentice picture framer with an art gallery in Bath, the city where Robert has lived and worked all his life. Already competent with water-colours the young apprentice took every opportunity to study the works of other artists and, after trying his hand at oils, quickly determined he could paint to the same standard as much of the art it was his job to frame. Soon the gallery was selling his paintings, and the owner, recognising Roberts talent, promoted him to the busy picture-restoring department. Here, he repaired and restored all manner of paintings and drawings, the expertise he developed becoming the foundation of his career as a professional artist. Picture restoration is an exacting skill, requiring the ability to emulate the techniques of other painters so as to render the damaged area of the work undetectable. After a decade of diligent application, Robert became one of the most capable picture restorers outside London. Today he attributes his versatility to the years he spent painstakingly working on the paintings of others artists. After fifteen years at the gallery, by chance he was introduced to Pat Barnard, whose military publishing business happened also to be located in the city of Bath. When offered the chance to become a full-time painter, Robert leapt at the opportunity. Within a few months of becoming a professional artist, he saw his first works in print. Roberts early career was devoted to maritime paintings, and he achieved early success with his prints of naval subjects, one of his admirers being Lord Louis Mountbatten. He exhibited successfully at the Royal Society of Marine Artists in London and soon his popularity attracted the attention of the media. Following a major feature on his work in a leading national daily newspaper he was invited to appear in a BBC Television programme. This led to a string of commissions for the Fleet Air Arm Museum who, understandably, wanted aircraft in their maritime paintings. It was the start of Roberts career as an aviation artist. Fascinated since childhood by the big, powerful machines that man has invented, switching from one type of hardware to another has never troubled him. Being an artist of the old school, Robert tackled the subject of painting aircraft with the same gusto as with his large, action-packed maritime pictures - big compositions supported by powerful and dramatic skies, painted on large canvases. It was a formula new to the aviation art genre, at the time not used to such sweeping canvases, but one that came naturally to an artist whose approach appeared to have origins in an earlier classical period. Roberts aviation paintings are instantly recognisable. He somehow manages to convey all the technical detail of aviation in a traditional and painterly style, reminiscent of the Old Masters. With uncanny ability, he is able to recreate scenes from the past with a carefully rehearsed realism that few other artists ever manage to achieve. This is partly due to his prodigious research but also his attention to detail: Not for him shiny new factory-fresh aircraft looking like museum specimens. His trade mark, flying machines that are battle-scarred, worse for wear, with dings down the fuselage, chips and dents along the leading edges of wings, oil stains trailing from engine cowlings, paintwork faded with dust and grime; his planes are real! Roberts aviation works have drawn crowds in the international arena since the early 1980s. He has exhibited throughout the US and Canada, Australia, Japan and in Europe. His one-man exhibition at the Smithsonians National Air and Space Museum in Washington DC was hailed as the most popular art exhibition ever held there. His paintings hang in many of the worlds great aviation museums, adorn boardrooms, offices and homes, and his limited edition prints are avidly collected all around the world. A family man with strong Christian values, Robert devotes most of what little spare time he has to his home life. Married to Mary for thirty five years, they have five children, all now grown up. Neither fame nor fortune has turned his head. He is the same easy-going, gentle character he was when setting out on his painting career all those years ago, but now with a confidence that comes with the knowledge that he has mastered his profession.

More about Robert Taylor

This Week's Half Price Art

 Tracer fire streaks past two Dambuster Lancasters of No.617 Sqn as the decisive Barnes-Wallace bouncing bomb skips towards the dam in the moonlit background.  Fire from the already burning buildings lights up the front face of the dam and reflects off the aircraft as they throttle up to make good their escape.

Dambusters over the Mohne by Ivan Berryman. (GS)
Half Price! - £250.00
 Flying low level at high speed through intense ground fire was all part of the daily task of the pilots of the Typhoon ground attack squadrons. Armed with rockets, 1000lb bombs and four 20mm cannon, this formidable fighter played a leading role in the Allied advance through occupied Europe. Leading up to, and following the Normandy landings through to the end of hostilities, the Typhoon, flown by determined hard hitting pilots, became the scourge of the German Panzer Divisions, and wrought havoc with enemy road and rail communications. Targets along the Rhine, over one of Germanys arteries of supply and communication and last line of defence, were given special attention by the Typhoon squadrons. Barges carrying vital supplies, munition trains on railroads hugging the river bank, and the ever present movement of troops and armour toward the battlefront were constantly attacked from the air. Led by Squadron Leader B. G. Stapme Stapleton, Mk1B Typhoons of 247 Squadron, 2nd Tactical Air Force, based at Eindhoven in Holland, make a low-level attack on enemy river transport on the Rhine in November 1944. Twisting and turning to avoid ground fires as best they can, the Typhoon pilots power their way through the valley with cannons blazing, pressing home their attack by strafing every German military target in their path. The supply cargo aboard the freight train is unlikely to reach its destination today! <br><br><b>Published 1999.</b>

Typhoons Over the Rhine by Nicolas Trudgian.
Half Price! - £130.00
 Designed the brothers Henri and Maurice Farman, the F.40 embodied many of the features of contemporary designs comprising a crew nacelle with pusher propeller and a tail supported by narrow booms and struts. Forty French squadrons were equipped with the type which first entered service in 1915 but, just one year later, they were being withdrawn as rapid developments in fighter design rendered them obsolete. One such example is shown here having surprised a single-seat Taube observation aircraft, which is spotting above some abandoned trenches near a crashed Albatros C.III. The F.40s prominent position for the gunner / observer was one of its qualities and, it is said, inspired the German AGO company when designing their C.1.

Farman F.40 by Ivan Berryman. (P)
Half Price! - £2000.00
 Martin B.26 Marauders of the 553rd Bomb Squadron, 386th Bomb Group are depicted approaching the Normandy coast early on 6th June 1944.  These aircraft were among the first to bomb the enemy gun emplacements and reinforcements situated along the beaches in order to help clear the way for the Allied landings that were just hours away at the start of Operation Overlord.  These B.26s carried out low level bombing sorties over Utah Beach, their low altitude being the key to their high level of success and accuracy.  Nearest aircraft is 131576 AN-Z '<i>Dinah Might</i>' now on display at the Utah Beach Museum.

Dawn Chorus - Tribute to the men of the 553rd Bomb Squadron, 386th Bomb Group by Ivan Berryman. (GS)
Half Price! - £250.00

 Despite having sight in just one eye, Major Edward Mick Mannock was to become one of the most decorated and celebrated aces of World War 1, bringing down an official 61 enemy aircraft in just eighteen months before himself being brought down in flames by enemy ground fire. He was reluctant to add shared kills to his tally, so his actual total of victories is recorded at 73. His decorations include the VC, DSO and 2 Bars, MC and Bar and he is depicted here diving on enemy aircraft in SE5a D278 of 74 Sqn in April, 1918.

Major Edward Mannock by Ivan Berryman. (GS)
Half Price! - £250.00
 With a final 47 victories to his credit, Robert Alexander Little was one of the highest-scoring British aces of World War 1, beginning his career with the famous No 8 (Naval) Squadron in 1916, flying Sopwith Pup N5182, as shown here. On 21st April 1917, he was attacked and shot down by six aircraft of Jasta Boelke, Little being thrown from the cockpit of his Sopwith Camel on impact with the ground. As the German aircraft swooped in to rake the wreckage with machine gun fire, Little pulled his Webley from its holster and began returning fire before being assisted by British infantry with their Lewis guns. Such was the character of this great pilot who finally met his death whilst attacking Gotha bombers on the night of 27th May 1918.

Captain Robert Little by Ivan Berryman. (GS)
Half Price! - £290.00
The leadership qualities and grim determination of Squadron Leader J R Baldwin was seldom better demonstrated that when he led a small flight of Hawker Typhoons against a force of some thirty Focke-Wulf Fw.190s in January 1944.  Nine of the German aircraft were shot down that day, Baldwin himself being responsible for two of them.  He is shown here in Typhoon PR-A of No.609 Squadron.

A Busy Day at the Office by Ivan Berryman. (GS)
Half Price! - £250.00
  Hurricane Mk.IIC Z3971 of 253 Sqn, closing on a Heinkel 111.

Hurricane Mk.IIC by Ivan Berryman. (E)
Half Price! - £45.00
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