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Scots Guards Saving the Colours at Alma by Lady Elizabeth Butler (Y)


Scots Guards Saving the Colours at Alma by Lady Elizabeth Butler (Y)

Depicting Captain Lindsay of the Scots Guards advancing with the colours which were shot through and staff broken. By this example he helped to restore order after a Russian onslaught had put the regiment in disorder.
Item Code : DHM0048YScots Guards Saving the Colours at Alma by Lady Elizabeth Butler (Y) - This Edition
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Other editions of this item : Scots Guards Saving the Colours at Alma by Lady Elizabeth Butler.DHM0048
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Artist Details : Lady Elizabeth Butler
Click here for a full list of all artwork by Lady Elizabeth Butler


Lady Elizabeth Butler

Elizabeth Thompson, later Lady Butler, was perhaps the leading painter of this genre of the late nineteenth century. Her famous quartet of paintings exhibited between 1874 and 1877 (Calling the Roll after and Engagement in the Crimea - Her Majesty the Queen; Quatre Bras - National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne; Balaclava - City of Manchester Art Gallery; and The Return from Inkerman - Ferens Art Gallery, Kingston upon Hull) established her reputation but her subsequent works never quite achieved the fame of these earlier pictures, in spite of such dramatic scenes as Scotland for Ever! (Leeds City Art Gallery) and The Defence of Rorkes Drift (Her Majesty the Queen) She continued to exhibit at the Royal Academy until 1920 but with few exceptions, all her pictures had military themes particularly soldiers in battle. While she never witnessed actual warfare, although she was in Egypt for some years in the 1880s with her husband, Lieut. Gen. Sir William Butler, many of her pictures were drawn accurately using models in some cases, or observing soldiers on maneuvers or practicing charges at Aldershot. For instance, when Queen Victoria commissioned the artist to depict the defense of Rorkes Drift, Elizabeth Butler went down to Gosport where the 24th Regiment was billeted upon its return from Natal, and made sketches from life. The soldiers even re-enacted the battle in their original uniforms worn throughout the campaign.

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