Customer Helpline
(UK) : 01436 820269

Shipping Rates
Valuation of Your Collection

You currently have no items in your basket

Join us on Facebook!


Buy with confidence and security!
Publishing historical art since 1985

Follow us on Twitter!

AMAZING VALUE SPECIAL OFFERS !

VIEW ALL OF OUR CURRENT SPECIAL OFFERS HERE!
 
Product Search        

Mill Reef by Jacqueline Stanhope.


Mill Reef by Jacqueline Stanhope.

Item Code : JS0006Mill Reef by Jacqueline Stanhope. - This Edition
TYPEEDITION DETAILSSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSYOUR PRICEPURCHASING
PRINTOpen edition print. Paper size 12 inches x 15 inches (31cm x 38cm)none£26.00

Quantity:
All prices on our website are displayed in British Pounds Sterling


Artist Details : Jacqueline Stanhope
Click here for a full list of all artwork by Jacqueline Stanhope

Jacqueline Stanhope

Jacqueline Stanhope was born in 1963 and was educated in Scotland. Facinated by horses and racing she began painting and drawing them at an early age by the young age of 10 she was using oils. She was gifted both academically as well as artistically, she began selling her work in secondary school. She left school at the age of 16 to follow her career in painting on a professional level, chosing this route over a career in medicine. She was facinated by anatomy and science more than art and started freelancing as a graphic and portrait artist. By age 21 she had undertaken work for Walt Disney and had painted football teams. Jacqueline took time out to raise a young family and then re-entered the art world by producing 'Northern Dancer & Sons' a limited edition print. This print led to a rise in her popularity with leaders in the racing world investing in her work. Her work is exhibited annually at Tattersalls December Sales which has also raised her profile with paintings being sold to clients worldwide.

More about Jacqueline Stanhope

This Week's Half Price Art

English soldiers search a blacksmiths hunting for highlanders who fled from after the battle of Culloden.
After Culloden, Rebel Hunting by J.S. Lucas.
Half Price! - £45.00
There is no retreat from here, men! said General Sir Colin Campbell (who at that moment may have said to have commanded the regiment in person) as he cantered along the front of the 93rd You must die where you stand To which some of the Highlanders replied cheerily Ay Ay, Sir Colin if needs be well do that. Nearer and nearer the Russian Squadrons approached - the ground trembling beneath their horses feet, and gathering speed at every stride, they galloped on towards that thin red streak, topped with steel   the Sutherland Highlanders awaited the onslaught of the enemys horsemen in line, without a movement in their ranks. I  would not even form four deep! was the reply of Sir Colin, when remonstrated with for giving the Russians such a chance. Cool as if on Birthday parade The Sutherlands stood until their foes were within 600 yards, then down on their knees they dropped the front rank, and delivered a steady volley. But the distance was too great, and, though a few saddles were emptied, the Russians pressed forward unchecked. On they rode, till scarcely 200 yards separated them from the intrepid Highlanders.  When the rear rank brought their Minies to the present and over the heads of their kneeling comrades pourd a withering fire into the enemys masses.Shaken to their very centre, the Russian Squadrons fell back, but, encouraged by their gallant leaders, they determined to make one last bid for victory, and wheeling around, endeavored to turn the Highlanders right flank. here they were checkmated by the grenadier Company, which received the charge with such a volley, that the Russians went Files about and scampered off to seek the shelter of their guns.

The Thin Red Line by Robert Gibb.
Half Price! - £37.00
Military art print of the Franco-Prussian war showing French Infantry defenders at the fortifications of Champigny.
The Defence of Champigny, November 30th 1870 by Edouard Detaille.
Half Price! - £20.00
The Duke of Cumberland, their colonel, commanding the allied forces; measured his strength with Marshal Saxe, who was then besieging Tournay.  The First Guards were on the right of the centre, in the first line, when the Duke, furious at the failure on both wings, ordered the masses of troops to attack.  The infantry dashed forward between the village and the redoubt, and as the British Guards advanced over a low ridge, and saw the French Guards before them, a scene occurred which has become legendary in military history. 'Messieurs les Anglais, tirez les premiers!' is a phrase that bespeaks the old fashioned chivalry with which foemen worthy of each other's steel loved to treat one another.  The story of what occurred is variously given.  'The officers of the English Guards,' says Voltaire, 'when in the presence of the enemy, saluted the French by taking off their hats.  The Comte de Chabannes, and the Duc de Biron, who were in advance returned the salute, as did all the officers of the French Guards.  Lord Charles Hay of the King's Company, 1st Guards, stepped forward and took off his hat.  Lord Charles Hay then pulled out a flask and drank a toast to the French, saying: 'Gentlemen of the French Guard, I hope you will wait for us today and not escape by swimming the Scheldt as you swam the Main at Dettingen.'  Then he turned to his Company and said: 'Men of the King's Company, these are the French Guards and I hope you are going to beat them today.'  Count D'Anteroche, lieutenant of grenadiers, replied in a loud voice:  'Gentlemen, we never fire first; we will follow you.'  The French troops opened fire first but most of their shots went high.  Then the British troops opened fire and nineteen officers and up to 600 men of the French Guards are said to have fallen at the first discharge, as the English pushed on, the enemy were borne back, and in the face of a terrific fire, the Guards drove them into their camp. Here, exposed to the tremendous reverse fire of the redoubt of Eu, the Guards according to Rousseau, formed themselves into a kind of square, and resisted repeated attacks of the cavalry of the French Guards and Carabineers.  But unsupported and decimated by the withering hail of iron that assailed them, attacked by fresh troops and the Irish brigades of Clare and Dillon, beset as in a fiery furnace, the Guards at length began to retire.  They did so in perfect order; but the First Guards left 4 officers, 3 sergeants and 82 men dead on the field, besides having 149 wounded in all.  It was a defeat due to bad generalship and want of cohesion among allies, but its sanguinary episodes added new lustre to the great fame of the Guards. 'There are things, 'says Marshal Saxe, - or some say his friend General D'Heronville, in his Trait des Legions - 'which all of us have seen, but of which our pride makes us silent because we well know we cannot imitate them.'  Fontenoy was a defeat for the British army.  During the battle Lord Charles Hay was wounded but would later be in action again.

The Battle of Fontenoy by Felix Philippoteaux.
Half Price! - £33.00

Following Napoleons deposition of Ferdinand IV, King of Naples in favour of his brother Joseph Bonaparte, the British government ordered General Sir John Stuart to land a force in Calabria, Southern Italy. On the 6th of July the French force of 4,000 infantry and 1,000 cavalry met the British force of 5,000 infantry. The battle was a British victory with losses of 330, compared to the French losses of 700 killed and 1,000 wounded with another 1,000 prisoners.

The Battle of Maida by De Louthembourg.
Half Price! - £25.00
 On January 22nd 1879, during the Zulu War, the small British field hospital and supply depot at Rorkes Drift in Natal was the site of one of the most heroic military defences of all time. Manned by 140 troops of the 24th Regiment, led by Lieutenant John Chard of the Royal Engineers, the camp was attacke by a well-trained and well-equipped Zulu army of 4000 men, heartened by the great Zulu victory over the British forces at Isandhlwana earlier on the same day. The battle began in mid afternoon, when British remnants of the defeat at Isandhlwana struggled into the camp. Anticipating trouble, Chard set his small force to guard the perimeter fence but, when the Zulu attack began, the Zulus came faster than the British could shoot and the camp was soon overcome. The thatched roof of the hospital was fired by Zulu spears wrapped in burning grass and even some of the sick and the dying were dragged from their beds and pressed into the desperate hand-to-hand fighting. Eventually, Chard gave the order to withdraw from the perimeter and to take position in a smaller compound, protected by a hastily assembled barricade of boxes and it was from behind this barricade that the garrison fought for their lives throughout the night. After twelve hours of battle, the camp was destroyed, the hospital had burned to the ground, seventeen British lay dead and ten were wounded. However, the Zulus had been repulsed and over 400 of their men killed. The Battle of Rorkes Drift is one of the greatest examples of bravery and heroism in British military history. Nine men were awarded Distinguished Conduct Medals, and eleven, the most ever given for a single battle, received the highest military honour of all, the Victoria Cross.

Defence of Rorkes Drift by Lady Elizabeth Butler. (C)
Half Price! - £40.00
DHM605.  Charge of the Russian Cuirassiers at Borodino by Jim Lancia.
Charge of the Russian Cuirassiers at Borodino by Jim Lancia.
Half Price! - £30.00
 The Duke of Wellington orders Maitland to move the infantry of the guard forward at the climax of the Battle of Waterloo during the Napoleonic war.
Now Maitland Now is Your Time by Thomas Jones Barker. (Y)
Half Price! - £320.00
          Home / View All Products                       View Your Basket