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With a Circuit To Go by Chris Howells.


With a Circuit To Go by Chris Howells.

Passing the stand in the Galway Plate.
Item Code : SFA0021With a Circuit To Go by Chris Howells. - This EditionAdd any two items on this offer to your basket, and the lower priced item will be half price in the checkout! Buy 1 Get 1 Half Price!
TYPEEDITION DETAILSSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSYOUR PRICEPURCHASING
PRINTLimited edition of 195 prints.

Image size 18 inches x 13.5 inches (46cm x 34cm)Artist : Chris HowellsHalf
Price!

Supplied with one or more free art prints!
Now : 70.00

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EXCLUSIVE website offer from Cranston Fine Arts - FREE art print(s) supplied with the above item!


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FREE PRINT : The Finish by Mark Churms.

This complimentary art print worth 40
(Size : 11 inches x 8 inches (28cm x 20cm))
has been specially chosen by Cranston Fine Arts to complement the above edition, and will be sent FREE with your order.

This item can be viewed or purchased separately in our shop, HERE


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Rooster Booster by Chris Howells.
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Artist Details : Chris Howells
Click here for a full list of all artwork by Chris Howells

Chris Howells

Chris Howells studied Graphic Design at Stourbridge College of Art and Design and was employed as a graphic designer until becoming a full time artist 30 years ago. He is widely known for his traditional rural landscapes and paintings of horses, collectors of his paintings coming from all parts of the world. Chris had exhibited extensively and regularly in both one man and group exhibitions.

More about Chris Howells

This Week's Half Price Art

CC066. Original pencil drawing by Chris Collingwood produced on art board.
Original pencil drawing by Chris Collingwood produced on art board. (P)
Half Price! - 270.00
 Private Robert Jones. Decorated for conspicuous bravery and devotion to the wounded at Rorkes drift. Private Robert and William Jones, posted in a room of the Hospital facing the hill, kept up a steady fire against enormous odds, and while one worked to cut a hole through the partition into the next room, the other shot Zulu after Zulu through the loophooled walls, using his own and his comrades rifle alternatively when the barrels became to hot to hold owing to the incessant firing. By their united heroic efforts six out of the seven patients were saved by being carried through the broken partition. the seventh, sergeant Maxwell being delirious, refused to be helped, and on Robert Jones returning to take him by force he found him being stabbed by the Zulus in his bed, Robert Jones died in 1898 in Peterchurch Herefordshire . Both men were awarded the Victoria Cross.

Last Man Out by Mark Churms. (Y)
Half Price! - 50.00
 The year is 1807, the French Empire is at the pinnacle of its power. Although not yet 38 years of age the Emperor Napoleon Bonaparte is marching towards the heights of his military career. It is the anniversary of his great victory against the Austrians at Marengo seven years before. Since then the soldiers of The Grand Armee have faithfully followed The Little Corporal from victory to victory across Europe.  Now, in eastern Prussia, the Russians alone are holding out against the might of France. Bennigsens army is strung out on a four mile front along the banks of the river Alle, near the town of Friedland. With their backs to the unfordable river the brave Russian soldiers are drawn up in a poor position to give battle.  It is already midday when Napoleon arrives on the field. Much of the French force is still some miles away but the commanders keen eye immediately perceives an opportunity for victory. He decides to attack. The vigourous assault on the Russian lines commences at about 5.30 pm. Bennigsen, anticipating an engagement on the following day, is completely surprised by this ferocious attack so late in the afternoon. The fighting begins as his divisions are preparing to withdraw across the river Alle, to a stronger position. Napoleons master stroke throws the enemy into confusion. By 8.30 pm the French are masters of the field, the Russians have lost nearly a third of their army and 80 cannons. The town of Friedland is ablaze and the Tsars army in full retreat.  In simple attire and characteristically astride a nimble arab grey, Napoleon Bonaparte rides forward with his reserves of the Guard to survey the final victory.  Within a few days the defeated Tsar Alexander will embrace the French Emperor on a raft anchored in the middle of the Niemen at Tilsit. At their monumental meeting they will talk of peace, co-operation against the British, the division of Prussian Territories and France with Russia will form their uneasy alliance that will quickly collapse into open hostility and present Napoleon with his greatest challenge: The invasion of Russia itself.

Napoleon at Friedland by Mark Churms. (AP)
Half Price! - 95.00
 After the unsuccessful march on London, Prince Charlie retreats to the safety of Scotland. The army regroups and more men come to join the cause, including soldiers from France. However King Georges men are never far away. As dark, winter rain clouds draw in over the high ground above the town of Falkirk, the Jacobite army assembles to face Hang-man Hawleys dragoons and infantry. A piper plays on while the men of Ogilvys Regiment, in the second line, load and make ready their weapons for the coming assault. Bonnie Prince Charlie (so called for his nature, not his looks) rides down the ranks followed by Lord Elcho and his Life Guards. Red coated Irish Pickets, regulars from France, are also in reserve.

The Jacobite Piper by Mark Churms. (Y)
Half Price! - 40.00

 Superb figure study of the 82nd Airborne in 1944.

82nd Airborne by Chris Collingwood. (Y)
Half Price! - 50.00
 Baron de Donops Brigade at the Battle of Waterloo, 5.30pm, 18th June 1815.  After four hours of fighting, the squadrons of Napoleons 3rd Cavalry Corps finally join the massed assaults on the battered allied infantry squares.  With the 42 year old marechal de camp Frederic-Guillaume de Donop at their head, the 2nd and 3rd Cuirassier Regiments break from a trot into a canter as they clear the ridge.  The heavy cavalry are smashed against the steadfast bayonets of the redcoats and countercharged by light horsemen.  In one of these encounters the general himself is terribly wounded and falls from his horse. His son (aide-de-camp) is also injured.  Both are reported missing and presumed captured.  Although the generals body is not found,it is certain that he met his death in the muddy fields of Waterloo alongside many of his brigade.  In 1895 his name is inscribed on the north face of LArc de Triomphe in Paris in recognition of his service to France.

La Charge (Donops Cavalry at Waterloo) by Mark Churms. (Y)
Half Price! - 50.00
Leading 30th Corps assault across the Seine at Vernon, 43rd Wessex Division gained an initial foothold on the east bank.  Heroic efforts however by the Royal Engineers of 71st, 72nd and 73rd Field Companies, succeeded in constructing a Class 9 Bailey bridge (David, shown left) and a Second Class 40 bridge (Goliath, shown right)  Despite constant enemy fire this amazing feat was achieved in only 2 days, and allowed 15/19th Hussars Cromwells and 4.7th Dragoons Guards Shermans to cross just in time to repulse a serious German counter attack by Tiger IIs of SS Panzer Abteilung 101.

David and Goliath, Vernon, France, 27th August 1944 by David Pentland. (GL)
Half Price! - 300.00
Napoleon is shown taking leave of the Imperial Guard outside the Palace of Fontainbleau. With a dramatic final gesture, I cannot embrace you all but I shall embrace your General, and after General Petit, he kissed the eagle of the 1st Grenadiers whose bearer, Lieut Fortin covers his face. The officers at the right are representative of the Allied armies and are considerably less affected by the scene than the Frenchman.

Les Adieux de Fontainebleau by Horace Vernet (B)
Half Price! - 30.00
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