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Napoleon III at Solferino by Jean Louis Ernest Meissonier. (Y)

Napoleon III at Solferino by Jean Louis Ernest Meissonier. (Y)

The Battle of Solferino, fought on 24th of June 1859 was the last battle at which both armies were commanded by their monarch; the French army commanded by Napoleon III and his Allies Victor Emmanuel II and his Sardinian Army were victorious over the Austrian Army commanded by Emperor Franz Joseph.
Item Code : DHM0238YNapoleon III at Solferino by Jean Louis Ernest Meissonier. (Y) - This Edition
**Open edition print. (One copy reduced to clear)

Ex-display prints with small dent on image and slight marks on the broder.
Image size 30 inches x 18 inches (76cm x 46cm)none£35 Off!Now : £25.00

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Other editions of this item : Napoleon III at Solferino by Jean Louis Ernest Meissonier.DHM0238
PRINTOpen edition print. Image size 30 inches x 18 inches (76cm x 46cm)noneHalf Price!Now : £30.00VIEW EDITION...
PRINTOpen edition print. Image size 12 inches x 7 inches (31cm x 18cm)noneAdd any two items on this offer to your basket, and the lower priced item will be half price in the checkout!£14.00VIEW EDITION...
Limited edition of 200 giclee canvas prints. Image size 36 inches x 24 inches (91cm x 61cm)noneAdd any two items on this offer to your basket, and the lower priced item will be half price in the checkout!£500.00VIEW EDITION...
Limited edition of 200 giclee canvas prints. Image size 30 inches x 18 inches (76cm x 46cm)noneAdd any two items on this offer to your basket, and the lower priced item will be half price in the checkout!£390.00VIEW EDITION...
General descriptions of types of editions :

Artist Details : Jean Louis Ernest Meissonier
Click here for a full list of all artwork by Jean Louis Ernest Meissonier

Jean Louis Ernest Meissonier

Jean Louis Ernest Meissonier Born in Lyons on 20th February, 1813, he served for a short period in a chemist shop but his interest in art quickly became apparent to his parents who arranged for him to enter the studios of various artists. He first exhibited at the Salon in 1835 and became a regular exhibitor throughout the 1840's and 1850's showing various non-military scenes. However, these pictures were enough to establish his reputation and he was invited by Napoleon 111 to join the Imperial Staff on the expedition to Italy in 1859. Inspired by what he witnesses, Meissonier began to paint military scenes from the war such as The Emperor at Solferino, which was shown at the 1864 Salon, and The Emperor and his staff. Six years later, France went to war with Prussia and the emperor once again turned to Meissonier for his services. While initially accepting the offer, the artist soon became discouraged by the growing defeats of the army and declined to become further involved but not before narrowly escaping being besieged in Metz. It was at this time that he developed his penchant for Napoleonic subjects as a way of glorifying France's military past in the wake of the disastrous defeat in 1871 and the subsequent horrors of the Paris Commune. Inspired by the first Napoleon, Meissonier developed the idea of creating a cycle of pictures dramatising the great soldier from his rise to his fall. The five pictures would each depict a moment in the emperor's life during the years 1796, 1807, 1810, 1814 and 1815, but in fact only three canvases were finished. In his picture, 1807, the artist depicted a moment during the final phase of the battle of Friedland when the Emperor and his staff reviewed the 12th Regiment of Cuirassiers as they charged past. For 1814, he arranged for horses to be marched back and forth in snow and mud so that he could sketch - and became quite ill in the process. In the picture, a grim-faced Napoleon leads his disheveled troops in retreat to avoid confrontation with the enemy. These pictures established him as perhaps one of the greatest military painters France had ever seen and he was a major source of inspiration to Detaille and de Neuville before he died in Paris on 31st January, 1891.

More about Jean Louis Ernest Meissonier

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 With the full might of Englands Army now gathered to do battle before the besieged Stirling Castle, the young Edward II Plantagenate is confident of victory over the enemy. To the west of the Bannockburn, Robert Bruce, King of Scots kneels to pray with his men and commends his soul to God. The Scottish battle lines are prepared. The Cavalry is in reserve to the rear behind the spearmen and archers (known as Flower of the forest) in tightly packed Schiltrons patiently awaiting the coming onslaught. Unknown to the English, the open marshy ground of no mans land conceals hidden pits and trenches, major obstacles for any mounted charge.  Despite Cliffords and de Beaumonts premature and unsuccessful attempt to relieve the castle the day before, years of victory have taught the brave English knights to regard their Scottish foes with contempt. So, without waiting for the bowmen to effectively weaken the enemy lines the order is hurriedly given to attack! With one rush hundreds of mounted knights led by the impetuous Earl of Gloucester thunder headlong through the boggy ground straight for the impenetrable forest of spears and into defeat and death.  With dash and courage the knights try to force a way through the mass of spears but the Scots stand firm. The momentum of the charge is lost and there is no room to manoeuvre. Everywhere horses and men crash to the ground, casualties amongst the English are horrific. Robert Bruce seizes the moment and orders the exultant army to advance. The Englishmen are slowly pushed back into the waters of the Bannockburn. All discipline is lost as the soldiers and horses madly scramble for the far bank of the burn. Many drown or perish in the crush to escape the deadly melee. Edward II, with his army destroyed, flees with his bodyguard for the safety of Stirling Castle but is refused refuge and has to fight his way south to England. For Robert Bruce and Scotland victory is complete.
Text by Paul Scarron-Jones.

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So Tell The Spartans, Stranger passing by that here, Obedient to their laws, we lie.   In 480 BC the Spartans tried to defend the pass at Thermopylae against the Persians led by Xerxes.  The Persian fleet had sailed along the coastline from northern Greece into the Gulf of Malia on the eastern Aegean Sea towards the mountains at Thermopylae. The Greek General and King Leonidas led the Greeks  and tried to defend the pass of Thermopylae.  All the defending Spartans were killed during the Battle of Thermopylae. Their defence and courage provided inspiration to the Greeks, and the following year the Greeks won battles against their old enemy the Persians.

Thermopylae 480BC, Spartan and Thespaian Hoplites. By Chris Collingwood.
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A French General followed by his staff officers watch as Grenadiers a Cheval pass.
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 Colditz - a forbidding medieval castle near Leiptzig, Germany - remains one of the most potent symbols of the Second World War. Reputed to be the Nazis most escape proof prison, this grim castle is the most notorious PoW camp in history with the distinction of being the only German prison that had more guards than prisoners. The castle was specifically used to impound incorrigible, Allied officers who had repeatedly escaped from other camps but putting so many experienced serial escapers in one place proved to be a rather questionable idea. Despite more conventional escape routes gradually being sealed off by the Germans, members of The Colditz Escape Academy continued to jump, tunnel and sneak out of this inescapable prison in surprising numbers. Early in the war Hermann Goering made a public declaration that Colditz was escape proof but he was to be proven wrong time and time again, and over 300 attempts were made during the course of the war, with more than 130 prisoners escaping and 31 successfully reaching home. When captured the result was three weeks in the solitary confinement block, however this didnt stop prisoners inventing even more elaborate means of escaping, even catapulting themselves out of high windows and of course the famous design and building of a sophisticated glider. This new edition, reproduced from a pencil drawing by Nicolas Trudgian, depicts the imposing castle shortly after being liberated by American troops in April 1945. In the foreground below a Sherman Tank of the 9th Armored Division stands on watch, close to the sign that was erected by the US 69th Infantry Division.
Colditz - Under New Management by Nicolas Trudgian.
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Lt. Melvill rescues the British colours from the field at Isandhlwana, South Africa.  For this action, he was awarded the Victoria Cross posthumously.  Lieutenant Melville was the adjutant of the 1st Battalion, the 24th Foot.  Melville collected the Queen's Colour from the guard tent towards the end of the battle and rode out of camp heading for the Tugela River.  Melville arrived at the river, and due to the heavy rains the Tugela was in flood.  Melville rode into the river but about half way across Melville came off his horse, still clutching the colours.  Lieutenant Coghill, also of the 24th Foot, crossed the river soon after and went to Melville's assistance.  The Zulus were on the bank and opened a heavy fire on them.  Lt Coghill's horse was killed and the colours swept away.  Both officers struggled to the Natal bank where it seems it is likely that both men were killed by Natal natives.  The colours would later be recovered from the Tugela River Both officers would be later awarded the Victoria Cross.

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There is no retreat from here, men! said General Sir Colin Campbell (who at that moment may have said to have commanded the regiment in person) as he cantered along the front of the 93rd You must die where you stand To which some of the Highlanders replied cheerily Ay Ay, Sir Colin if needs be well do that. 
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The Thin Red Line by Robert Gibb. (B)
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 The Battle of Ulundi took place at the Zulu capital of Ulundi on 4th July 1879. Ulundi became the last battle to be fought during the Zulu war and the British victory finally broke the military power of the Zulu Nation. The battle began at 6 a.m. when Buller led out an advance guard of mounted troops and South African irregulars. The British force comprised of five companies of the 80th regiment in square in four ranks, with two Gatling Guns in the centres, two 9-pounders on the left flank and two 7-pounders on the right. The 90th Light Infantry with four companies of the 94th regiment made up the left face with two more 7-pounders. On the right face were the 1st Battalion of the 13th Light Infantry, four companies of the 58th Regiment, two 7-pounders and two 9-pounders. The rear face was composed of two companies of the 94th Regiment and two companies of the 2nd Battalion of the 21st Regiment. In the middle of the square were headquarters staff, No. 5 company of the Royal Engineers whhich was led by Lt John Chard who had commanded the troops at Rorkes Drift, the 2nd Native Natal Contingent, fifty wagons and carts with reserve ammunition and hospital wagons. Bullers horsemen protected the front and both flanks of the square. A rearguard of two squadrons of the 17th Lancers and a troop of Natal Native Horse followed. In total the British force stood at just over 5300 against the Zulu warrior regiments in total over 15000. The Zulu warriors charged again and again at the square but with the strong British firepower of tifle and gatling gun, they could not get close. As the Zulu warriors strength weakened, Lord Chelmsford ordered the cavalry to mount, and the 17th Lancers and the 1st Kings Dragoon Guards along with colonial cavalry were ordered to charge the now fleeing Zulus. The Zulus fled towards the high ground with the cavalry in pursuit. The Lancers were checked at the Mbilane stream by the fire of a concealed party of Zulus, causing a number casualties before the 17th Lancers overcame the Zulu resistance. The pursuit continued until not one living Zulu remained on the Mahlabatini plain, with members of the Natal Native Horse, Natal Native Contingent and Woods Irregulars slaughtering the Zulu wounded, done in revenge for the massacre at Isandlwana.

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