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On a Winters Morn by Chris Howells.


On a Winters Morn by Chris Howells.

Exercising on a snow covered Curragh.
Item Code : SFA0020On a Winters Morn by Chris Howells. - This Edition
TYPEEDITION DETAILSSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSYOUR PRICEPURCHASING
PRINTLimited edition of 195 prints.

Image size 18 inches x 13.5 inches (46cm x 34cm)Artist : Chris Howells20 Off!Now : 60.00

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Artist Details : Chris Howells
Click here for a full list of all artwork by Chris Howells

Chris Howells

Chris Howells studied Graphic Design at Stourbridge College of Art and Design and was employed as a graphic designer until becoming a full time artist 30 years ago. He is widely known for his traditional rural landscapes and paintings of horses, collectors of his paintings coming from all parts of the world. Chris had exhibited extensively and regularly in both one man and group exhibitions.

More about Chris Howells

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