Customer Helpline
(UK) : 01436 820269

Shipping Rates
Valuation of Your Collection

You currently have no items in your basket

Choose a FREE print if you spend over 220!
See Choice of Free Prints

Join us on Facebook!


Buy with confidence and security!
Publishing historical art since 1985

Follow us on Twitter!

Product Search        

Rock of Gibraltar by Stephen Smith.


Rock of Gibraltar by Stephen Smith.

Item Code : SFA0006Rock of Gibraltar by Stephen Smith. - This Edition
TYPEEDITION DETAILSSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSYOUR PRICEPURCHASING
PRINTLimited edition of 125 prints. Image size 21 inches x 16 inches (53cm x 41cm)Artist : Stephen Smith50 Off!
Supplied with one or more free art prints!
Now : 100.00

Quantity:
EXCLUSIVE website offer from Cranston Fine Arts - FREE art print(s) supplied with the above item!


Exclusive Offer for Online Orders Only

FREE PRINT : The Finish by Mark Churms.

This complimentary art print worth 40
(Size : 11 inches x 8 inches (28cm x 20cm))
has been specially chosen by Cranston Fine Arts to complement the above edition, and will be sent FREE with your order.

This item can be viewed or purchased separately in our shop, HERE


All prices on our website are displayed in British Pounds Sterling


Artist Details : Stephen Smith
Click here for a full list of all artwork by Stephen Smith

Stephen Smith

His definitive and deliberate style is very popular with clients wanting a portrait or action oil painting of a particular horse. Not only is Stephen's style sought after in the UK and Ireland but commissions have arrived from U.S.A. and Japan. He has three originals hanging in the reception at Coolmore (IRE) and other clients include Mick Kinane (2), Derek Thompson (2), Kieren Fallon, Jamie Spencer, Richard Hills, Timmy Hyde and Aidan O'Brien.

More about Stephen Smith

This Week's Half Price Art

DHM691.  Sir Walter Raleigh by Chris Collingwood.

Sir Walter Raleigh by Chris Collingwood.
Half Price! - 35.00
 Corporal Allen and Corporal Lyons, B. Company 2nd Battalion 24th Foot Rorkes Drift Back Wall, 6pm January 22nd 1879.  After the initial Zulu assault on the back wall of the post failed at about 4.30pm, a fire-fight broke out between Zulu snipers posted on the terraces of the Shiyane (Oskarsberg) Hill and the defenders posted behind the barricade of wagons and mealie-bags. This section of the wall as commanded by Sergeant Henry Gallagher, of B Company. At about 6 pm, Corporal Lyons was leaning over the barricade to aim when he was hit in the neck by a bullet which paralysed him, as his friend, Corporal Allen, bent to help him, Allen too was shot through the arm. In the foreground Corporal Attwood of the Army Service Corps distributes ammunition. The wall was abandoned shortly after and the British retired to the small are in front of the storehouse. Allen was later awarded the VC, and Attwood the DCM.  He was born at Churcham, Gloucestershire, and served for five years in the Monmouthshire Militia before joining the 24th Regiment. He served through the Kaffir War 1877-8 before his bravery at Rorkes Drift for which he was presented with the Victoria Cross by Lord Wolseley on August 3rd 1879. He later served in the 1st Volunteers Battalion Royal Fusiliers.

Wounded by Mark Churms. (P)
Half Price! - 4200.00
 French dragoons attack a Spanish farmhouse where they believe Spanish guerillas are hiding.

La Gueper Espagnol by Mark Churms. (Y)
Half Price! - 20.00
DHM229.  Crossing the Ford by H Bellange.
Crossing the Ford by H Bellange.
Half Price! - 30.00

 El Alamein, October 28th 1943, Field Marshal Erwin Rommel discusses the critical battle situation with the Commanding Officer of the 21st Panzer Division, in front of his Kampfstaffel.  This personal mobile headquarters comprised a variety of vehicles including a radio Panzer III, SDKfz 232 radio armoured car, Rommels famous SDKfz 250/3 communications half-track GREIF and captured British Honey light tanks.

The Desert Fox by David Pentland. (GL)
Half Price! - 300.00
 Shows the French Cuirassiers of the 2nd Empire of Napoleon the 3rd.

Le Drapeau by Edouard Detaille. (Y)
Half Price! - 25.00
 To commemorate the first use of Factor VIIa by British Forces.
Dawn Casevac, 16 Close Support Medical Regiment - Iraq 2003 by Ivan Berryman. (GL)
Half Price! - 300.00
 Battle of Agincourt, October 25th 1415. Fought during the Hundred years war at the end of the English Invasion of 1415. King Henry the V of England, after his conquest of Harfleur marched his army of 1,000 Knights and 5,000 Archers (many of which were Welsh) towards Calais. He marched to Amiens as flooding had affected the river at the Somme which was the direct route. This delay helped the French army of 20,000 strong under the command of the Constable Charles dAlbret and Marshal Jean Bouciquaut II. The French army blocked Henry V route to Calais, giving the English no choice but to fight. Henry V positioned his army at Agincourt, between to wooded areas giving a frontage of 1100 metres. Henry deployed his force into three divisions; each group had archers at each flank. He had chosen his position well, in front of his army was ploughed fields and due to the heavy raid was very muddy. Due to the narrow battlefield area the French army lost their advantage of superior numbers. At 11 oclock the English started to advance their archers within 2509 yards of the French, getting them into range of the French lines. The French line of Cavalry advanced at a slow pass due to the heavy mud, They took heavy losses from the arrows from the English Long Bowman. They were eventually repulsed by the Archers who as the French cavalry approached changed from using longbows for axes and swords. The French second Cavalry line advanced only to be finally repulsed after hand to hand fighting. The commander Duc dAlencon was killed in the attack. The second charge had failed and many of the French knights were taken prisoner. Believing he had been attacked in the rear Henry V ordered that the prisoners were to be put to death. In fact There was no real rear attack it was French Camp followers plundering the English Camp. The French camp followers were quickly dealt with and the English again prepared itself for the next attack. The third attack never materialized as the sight of so much blood shed and piles of corpses turned the charge into a retreat. The English had won the day with losses less than 1600 compared to the French losses of over 7,000, including the capture of Bouciquaut. Henry V, his way now cleared reached Calais on the 16th November 1415. Agincourt is one of the great battles of military history, and this victory enabled Henry V to return to France in 1417 and conquer all of Normandy.

Morning of Agincourt by Sir John Gilbert. (Y)
Half Price! - 30.00
          Home / View All Products                       View Your Basket