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Morning of Agincourt by Sir John Gilbert. (Y)


Morning of Agincourt by Sir John Gilbert. (Y)

Battle of Agincourt, October 25th 1415. Fought during the Hundred years war at the end of the English Invasion of 1415. King Henry the V of England, after his conquest of Harfleur marched his army of 1,000 Knights and 5,000 Archers (many of which were Welsh) towards Calais. He marched to Amiens as flooding had affected the river at the Somme which was the direct route. This delay helped the French army of 20,000 strong under the command of the Constable Charles dAlbret and Marshal Jean Bouciquaut II. The French army blocked Henry V route to Calais, giving the English no choice but to fight. Henry V positioned his army at Agincourt, between to wooded areas giving a frontage of 1100 metres. Henry deployed his force into three divisions; each group had archers at each flank. He had chosen his position well, in front of his army was ploughed fields and due to the heavy raid was very muddy. Due to the narrow battlefield area the French army lost their advantage of superior numbers. At 11 oclock the English started to advance their archers within 2509 yards of the French, getting them into range of the French lines. The French line of Cavalry advanced at a slow pass due to the heavy mud, They took heavy losses from the arrows from the English Long Bowman. They were eventually repulsed by the Archers who as the French cavalry approached changed from using longbows for axes and swords. The French second Cavalry line advanced only to be finally repulsed after hand to hand fighting. The commander Duc dAlencon was killed in the attack. The second charge had failed and many of the French knights were taken prisoner. Believing he had been attacked in the rear Henry V ordered that the prisoners were to be put to death. In fact There was no real rear attack it was French Camp followers plundering the English Camp. The French camp followers were quickly dealt with and the English again prepared itself for the next attack. The third attack never materialized as the sight of so much blood shed and piles of corpses turned the charge into a retreat. The English had won the day with losses less than 1600 compared to the French losses of over 7,000, including the capture of Bouciquaut. Henry V, his way now cleared reached Calais on the 16th November 1415. Agincourt is one of the great battles of military history, and this victory enabled Henry V to return to France in 1417 and conquer all of Normandy.
Item Code : DHM0477YMorning of Agincourt by Sir John Gilbert. (Y) - This Edition
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Other editions of this item : Morning of Agincourt by Sir John Gilbert.DHM0477
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Artist Details : Sir John Gilbert
Click here for a full list of all artwork by Sir John Gilbert

Sir John Gilbert

His father was a captain in the Royal East London Militia, but after this regiment was disbanded, became an estate-agent. John Gilbert started in this business but showed a talent for sketching, and submitted his first picture for exhibition at the age of nineteen. He was soon exhibiting at the Royal Academy and became a full academician in 1876. Five years earlier, he had been knighted. Gilbert was also a major illustrator of the nineteenth century and frequently contributed pictures to the Illustrated London News one of which depicted the Charge of the Scots Greys at Waterloo. His interest in history led to numerous paintings, particularly water-colours of historic battles. The Civil War was a common theme in his output, and several important canvases exist: Waiting for the Ring: Marston Moor (Southgate Gallery of Wolverhampton), A Regiment of Royalist Cavalry, and Naseby (Towneley Hall Art Gallery, Burnley), which was exhibited at Royal Academy in 1873. Similarly, the Crusades and the Middle Ages provided material for military pictures, e.g. The Morning of the Battle of Agincourt and Queen Margaret of Anjou taken prisoners after the Battle of Tewkesbury (both Guildhall Art Gallery), Crusaders an the March (water-colour in Victorian and Albert Museum), and The Battle of the Standard, Northallerton (water-colour in Guildhall Art Gallery; another version at Oldham Art Gallery). His canvas Edward 111 at the Siege of Calais was destroyed by enemy bombing when the Guildhall Art Gallery was hit. Reference: DNB; Spielman 1897; Oldcastle 1878

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