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Arkle by Graham Isom.


Arkle by Graham Isom.

Arkle's Career Achievements :
1963 John Jameson Cup Chase
1963 Power Gold Cup Steeplechase
1963 Broadway Novices Steeplechase
1964 Cheltenham Gold Cup
1964 Irish Grand National Handicap Chase
1964 Leopardstown Handicap Chase
1964 Hennessey Gold Cup Handicap Chase
1965 Cheltenham Gold Cup
1965 Leopardstown Handicap chase
1965 Whitbread Gold Cup Handicap Chase
1966 Leopardstown Handicap chase
1966 Cheltenham Gold Cup
1966 King George VI Chase
1966 Hennessey Gold Cup Handicap Chase
1966 Gallaher Gold Cup Chase
1967 S.G.B Handicap Steeplechase
Item Code : SPS7169Arkle by Graham Isom. - This Edition
TYPEEDITION DETAILSSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSYOUR PRICEPURCHASING
PRINTOpen edition print.

Image size 16 inches x 12 inches (41cm x 31cm)none£34.00

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Artist Details : Graham Isom
Click here for a full list of all artwork by Graham Isom


Graham Isom

Graham Isom is possessed of what has been described by Horse and Hound magazine as a tremendous ability to paint horses in action. Graham Isom was born in 1945, in Kent. and brought up around his fathers riding school. where he first developed his love of horses. He studied at Ravensboune College of Art, where he specialised in sculpture. Having left college, he went through a series of jobs. including working as a groom in a stables on Dartmoor, labouring on a building site and running a shoe shop, and it was not until the late 1960s that he returned to the art world, when he taught sculpture and painting to A-level students in Dorset. After five years as a teacher, his private commissions increased sufficiently to enable bun to devote all his tinie to painting. For two years he specialised in figure studies but he turned freelance in 1973 and was able to concentrate increasingly on equestrian subjects. His commissions have included work for many stables, owners and even for the Officers Mess of the Household Cavalry. A regular award winner, Grahain Isom was decorated by the American Academy of Equine Artists in every year from 1990-1993. In 1993 alone he received a trio ol a,s ards: Best Racing Picture, Best Sporting Picture and Most Popular Picture.

More about Graham Isom

This Week's Half Price Art

French infantry struggle to defend a large gateway from the onslaught of the Prussian Infantry during the Franco - Prussian war.
La Defence de la Longbayau by Alphonse De Neuville (GS)
Half Price! - £200.00
 The 87th Regiment defend the walls against the French 13th Dragoons as they charge by during the Battle of Vitoria.

87th Regiment at the Battle of Vitoria by Brian Palmer (GS)
Half Price! - £250.00
 Limited edition of up to 50 giclee canvas prints.

French Attack on Hougoumont Farm at the Battle of Waterloo by Jason Askew. (GL)
Half Price! - £300.00
 Helmand Province, Afghanistan, April 2007.  Troops of 1st Battalion Royal Anglian Regiment engage Taliban insurgents from a compound roof at dusk during Operation Herrick 6.  In addition to small arms a one shot AT4 anti tank launcher is used against more difficult targets.

On the Roof by David Pentland.
Half Price! - £70.00

The term Panzergrenadier was applied equally to both the infantry section of the German Panzer Divisons and was also used for the new Panzergrenadier Divisions.  The German army Panzergrenadier Divisions initially came from existing infantry divisions but were the first Divisons to be motorised.  These included the 3rd, 10th, 14th, 15th, 16th, 18th, 20th, 25th, and 29th divisions.  During the war special elite regiments such as the Grosdeutchland Division were created.  The Waffen SS also produced a number of panzergrenadier regiments.  Many army and Waffen SS regiments were upgraded to Panzer divisions during the later stages of the war.  The Panzergrenadier division usually consisted of six battalions of truck-mounted infantry organized into either two or three regiments, also a battalion of tanks and artillery were included along with sections of anti-tank, anti-aircraft and combat engineers.  Panzer grenadier divisions were often equipped with assault guns - <i>Stugs</i>.  Panzergrenadier divisions had one tank battalion less than a Panzer division but strengthened with two more infantry battalions.  Of 226 panzergrenadier battalions in the whole of the German Army, Waffen SS  (and some in the Luftwaffe ) in September 1943, only 26 were equipped with armoured half tracks, the remaining Panzergrenadier divisions were equipped with trucks.

SS Panzer Grenadiers by Chris Collingwood. (GL)
Half Price! - £350.00
Robert the Bruces Scots army stand fast as the English knights attack. Robert the Bruce succeeds in defeating the English army at Stirling.  With the full might of Englands army gathered before the besieged Stirling Castle, Edward II Plantagenate is confident of victory. To the west of Bannockburn, Robert Bruce, King of Scots, kneels to pray with his men and commends his soul to God.  Patiently awaiting the coming onslaught in tightly packed schiltroms, his spearmen and archers are well prepared for battle. Unknown to the English, the open marsh of no mans land conceals hidden pits and calthrops, major obstacles for any mounted charge. Despite Cliffords and Beaumonts premature and unsuccessful attempt to relieve Stirling the day before, years of victory have caused the brave English knights to regard their Scottish foes with contempt. So, without waiting for the flower of the forest (archers) to weaken the enemy formations, the order is hurriedly given to attack! With one rush, hundreds of mounted knights led by the impetuous Earl of Gloucester, thunder headlong through the boggy ground straight for the impenetrable mass of spears, hurling themselves into defeat and death. With dash and courage the knights try to force a way through but the infantry stand firm. There is no room to manoeuvre. Everywhere horses and men crash to the ground. Casualties amongst the English nobility are horrific. Bruce seizes the moment and orders the exultant army to advance. The English recoil and are pushed back into the waters of the Bannockburn where many perish in the crush to escape the deadly melee. Edward II, his army destroyed, flees with his bodyguard for the safety of the castle but is refused refuge and has to fight his way south to England. For Robert Bruce and Scotland, victory is complete.

The Battle of Bannockburn by Brian Palmer (P)
Half Price! - £1700.00
 The Battle of Aliwal was fought on 28th January 1846 between the British and the Sikhs.  The British were led by Sir Harry Smith, while the Sikhs were led by Ranjodh Singh Majithia.  The British won a victory which is sometimes regarded as the turning point of the First Anglo-Sikh War.  The Sikhs had occupied a position 4 miles (6.4 km) long, which ran along a ridge between the villages of Aliwal, on the Sutlej, and Bhundri.  The Sutlej ran close to their rear for the entire length of their line, making it difficult for them to manoeuvre and also potentially disastrous if they were forced to retreat.  After the initial artillery salvoes, Smith determined that Aliwal was the Sikh weak point.  He sent two of his four infantry brigades to capture the village, from where they could enfilade the Sikh centre.  They seized the village, and began pressing forwards to threaten the fords across the Sutlej.  As the Sikhs tried to swing back their left, pivoting on Bhundri, some of their cavalry tried to threaten the open British left flank.  A British and Indian cavalry brigade, led by the 16th Lancers, charged and dispersed them.  The 16th Lancers then attacked a large body of Sikh infantry.  These were battalions organised and trained in contemporary European fashion by Neapolitan mercenary, Paolo Di Avitabile.  They formed square to receive cavalry, as most European armies did.  Nevertheless, the 16th Lancers broke them, with heavy casualties.  The infantry in the Sikh centre tried to defend a nullah (dry stream bed), but were enfiladed and forced into the open by a Bengal infantry regiment, and then cut down by fire from Smith's batteries of Bengal Horse Artillery.  Unlike most of the battles of both Anglo-Sikh Wars, when the Sikhs at Aliwal began to retreat, the retreat quickly turned into a disorderly rout across the fords.  Most of the Sikh guns were abandoned, either on the river bank or in the fords, along with all baggage, tents and supplies.  They lost 2,000 men and 67 guns. <i><br><br>Comment from the artist, Jason Askew.</i><br><br>This painting shows the extremely violent and brutal clash between British cavalry (16th Lancers) and Sikh infantry at the battle of Aliwal.  The Sikh infantry formed 2 triangles, a version of the famous Allied/British squares used at Waterloo, but the Sikhs, after firing a ragged volley at the attacking horsemen, dropped their muskets and assaulted the cavalry with their traditional Tulwars (sabres) and dhal shields.  These shields are also used offensively, to punch, and to slice with the edge.  Although the British horsemen claimed a victory as they felt they successfully dispersed the Sikh triangles, and forced the Sikh infantry to retreat to the nullah (dry stream bed) in the Sikh rear, this opinion is open to debate.  The Sikhs traditionally fought in loose formations, with tulwar and shield-taking full advantage of their abilities as swordsmen, blades being weapons with which the Sikhs are particularly skilled in the use of.  The Sikhs actually inflicted more casualties on the 16th Lancers than the lancers inflicted on the Sikh infantry.  British eye witnesses spoke of the sight of the grotesquely swollen and distorted dead bodies of men and horses of the Her Majesty's 16th Lancers, stinking in the sun and littering the ground at Aliwal - testimony to the progress of their charge.  The regiment lost 27% of effectives out of a total strength of over 400 effectives.  The lancers were dreadfully hacked about, many being cruelly maimed for life, losing hands and limbs to the slashing strokes of the Sikh blades.  The Sikhs had no compassion for the cavalry horses either - many of the poor animals (over 100 by some accounts) had to be shot, due to having their legs hacked clean off, or being literally disemboweled by Sikh Tulwars.  In the painting, the central figure with the wizard-shaped Turban, is in fact an Akali - a sect of extremely religious Sikhs, who disdained the use of armour, and often fought to the death with a fanatical and suicidal devotion.

The Battle of Aliwal by Jason Askew. (GS)
Half Price! - £250.00
Corporal Styles of the 1st Royal Dragoons displays a captured French Eagle to the cheering Black Watch. Behind him can be seen Wellington.

The Captive Eagle by J P Beadle.
Half Price! - £40.00
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