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Cheltenham by Graham Isom.


Cheltenham by Graham Isom.

Graham Isom has chosen to portray perhaps the greatest National Hunt course in the world in this, his latest limited edition. The magnificent Cheltenham Racecourse, known across the world as the home of National Hunt racing, offers 16 race meetings in a season lasting from October to April. Highlight of the racing calendar is the National Hunt Festival in March, which features the famous Cheltenham Gold Cup and Champion Hurdle. The racecourse itself is set in a natural bowl, to which the Cotswolds provide a spectacular backdrop. The brown and purple hills which stand in and around the course are justly famous and, whether in low mist or in the beautiful spring sunshine, the weather and landscape can combine to produce the most remarkable effects of light and colour on race-days. Always driven by his love of horses, Graham Isoms painting of Cheltenham specifically depicts two of the great horses in the 2000 Gold Cup: Florida Pearl, ridden by Paul Carberry, and the eventual victor, Looks Like Trouble, ridden by Richard Johnson and wearing number 7.
Item Code : LIM0486Cheltenham by Graham Isom. - This Edition
TYPEEDITION DETAILSSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSYOUR PRICEPURCHASING
PRINTLimited edition of 495 prints.

Image size 16 inches x 24 inches (41cm x 61cm)Artist : Graham Isom£70.00

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Artist Details : Graham Isom
Click here for a full list of all artwork by Graham Isom


Graham Isom

Graham Isom is possessed of what has been described by Horse and Hound magazine as a tremendous ability to paint horses in action. Graham Isom was born in 1945, in Kent. and brought up around his fathers riding school. where he first developed his love of horses. He studied at Ravensboune College of Art, where he specialised in sculpture. Having left college, he went through a series of jobs. including working as a groom in a stables on Dartmoor, labouring on a building site and running a shoe shop, and it was not until the late 1960s that he returned to the art world, when he taught sculpture and painting to A-level students in Dorset. After five years as a teacher, his private commissions increased sufficiently to enable bun to devote all his tinie to painting. For two years he specialised in figure studies but he turned freelance in 1973 and was able to concentrate increasingly on equestrian subjects. His commissions have included work for many stables, owners and even for the Officers Mess of the Household Cavalry. A regular award winner, Grahain Isom was decorated by the American Academy of Equine Artists in every year from 1990-1993. In 1993 alone he received a trio ol a,s ards: Best Racing Picture, Best Sporting Picture and Most Popular Picture.

More about Graham Isom

This Week's Half Price Art

 Robert the Bruces Scots army stand fast as the English knights attack. Robert the Bruce succeeds in defeating the English army at Stirling.  With the full might of Englands army gathered before the besieged Stirling Castle, Edward II Plantagenate is confident of victory. To the west of Bannockburn, Robert Bruce, King of Scots, kneels to pray with his men and commends his soul to God.  Patiently awaiting the coming onslaught in tightly packed schiltroms, his spearmen and archers are well prepared for battle. Unknown to the English, the open marsh of no mans land conceals hidden pits and calthrops, major obstacles for any mounted charge. Despite Cliffords and Beaumonts premature and unsuccessful attempt to relieve Stirling the day before, years of victory have caused the brave English knights to regard their Scottish foes with contempt. So, without waiting for the flower of the forest (archers) to weaken the enemy formations, the order is hurriedly given to attack! With one rush, hundreds of mounted knights led by the impetuous Earl of Gloucester, thunder headlong through the boggy ground straight for the impenetrable mass of spears, hurling themselves into defeat and death. With dash and courage the knights try to force a way through but the infantry stand firm. There is no room to manoeuvre. Everywhere horses and men crash to the ground. Casualties amongst the English nobility are horrific. Bruce seizes the moment and orders the exultant army to advance. The English recoil and are pushed back into the waters of the Bannockburn where many perish in the crush to escape the deadly melee. Edward II, his army destroyed, flees with his bodyguard for the safety of the castle but is refused refuge and has to fight his way south to England. For Robert Bruce and Scotland, victory is complete.

The Battle of Bannockburn by Brian Palmer.
Half Price! - £80.00
Depicting the Light Brigade at the moment of reaching the Russian guns. Shown are the 11th Hussars and the 17th Lancers.  The all time classic image of the disastrous  Charge of the Light Brigade which included the 17th lancers, who lead the charge.  Lord Cardigan is shown on the left, dressed in his 11th Hussars uniform.   The Light Brigade were being kept in reserve, after the successful charge of the heavy brigade, but the slow advance of the British Infantry to take advantage of the heavy brigades success had given the Russian forces time to take away Artillery pieces from captured redoubts.  Raglan, after seeing this ordered the light brigade to advance rapidly to the front, follow the enemy and try to prevent the enemy carrying away the guns. This message taken by Captain Nolan, to Lord Lucan, the cavalry Commander.  One of the Officers of Raglans Staff, urged Lucan, who could only see the main Russian Artillery position at the head of a valley.  Lord Lucan rode over to Cardigan and ordered him to attack these guns.  So the Light Brigade charged these Russian guns, and not the guns being taken away by Russian forces from the redoubts. The carnage was great, from the 673 men who started the charge, 113 men were killed and many others wounded. The Light Brigade was made up of the 4th and 13th Light Dragoons, 8th and 11th Hussars and the 17th Lancers. A spectating French Officer General Pierre Bosquet proclaimed - It is magnificent but it is not war.

Relief of the Light Brigade by Richard Caton Woodville (GL)
Half Price! - £300.00
3 Para group during Operation Agricola, Kosovo, 12th June - 1st August 1999.

Mobile Patrol in Pristina by David Rowlands (GS)
Half Price! - £250.00
 Study for the original painting Charge and Pursue.
Lucknow 1857 - Queens Bays Trooper Engaging Mutinous Officer by Mark Churms. (P)
Half Price! - £145.00

 Helmand Province, Afghanistan, July 2008.  A specialist search team of Royal Engineers, 2 PARA, and Army Dog Unit clear the route of Improvised Explosive Devices during a routine patrol in the Sangin area.

The Hidden Enemy by David Pentland. (GS)
Half Price! - £250.00
As the evening draws to a close Napoleon is seen riding amongst his men after their victory at the Battle of Friedland.  Due to the French pressure the Russian Commander General Levin Bennigsen moved his army back to his main camp at Konigsberg in June 1807, while his army of 60,000 men crossed the River Alle at Friedland.  It was faced by a French force of 26,000 under the command of Marshal Jean Lannes. The Russian Commander attacked early on the 14th of June. The much smaller force fought of the Russian attacks for nine hours, giving time for the main French force of 80,000 to arrive. Marshall Neys Force came up from the south and attacked the Russian left flank which gave way all the way along the river until just outside Friedland where it was halted. A second corps under the command of General Laude Victor came to the support of Neys left flank. Victor also brought up 30 Artillery pieces which blasted the Russians at very short range. The Russians that were massed in the tiny village and unable to cross the River received huge numbers of casualties due to the artillery fire. General Bennigsens army was decimated with most of his troops killed, wounded or forced to cross the river.  The actual looses were 11,000 dead, 7,000 wounded and many thousands of troops drowned trying to cross the river. This compared to the French losses of 1372 killed 9,108 wounded.   The French army pursued the Russians with Marshal Soult occupying Konigsberg on June 16th.  A few days later Czar Alexander I arranged a truce and on the 25th of June on a barge like raft on the River Niemen along with the Prussian King Frederick Willaim III drew up the Treaty of Tilset. Prussia ceded to France all the territories West of the Elbe, becoming the Kingdom of Westphalia and from the area of Poland both Russia and Prussia recognised the new state, The Duchy of Warsaw.

Battle of Friedland by Horace Vernet (GL)
Half Price! - £300.00
Confederate cavalry with the battle flag of the Confederacy gallop into battle.  The battle flag was also known as the Southern Cross.

Southern Steel by Simon Smith (P)
Half Price! - £2000.00
DHM938.  Apsaroke Crow by Alan Herriot.

Apsaroke Crow by Alan Herriot.
Half Price! - £30.00
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