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In The Paddock by Graham Isom.


In The Paddock by Graham Isom.

Item Code : LIM0438In The Paddock by Graham Isom. - This Edition
TYPEEDITION DETAILSSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSYOUR PRICEPURCHASING
PRINTLimited Edition of 500 prints. Image size 14 inches x 18 inches (36cm x 46cm)Artist : Graham Isom£70.00

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Artist Details : Graham Isom
Click here for a full list of all artwork by Graham Isom


Graham Isom

Graham Isom is possessed of what has been described by Horse and Hound magazine as a tremendous ability to paint horses in action. Graham Isom was born in 1945, in Kent. and brought up around his fathers riding school. where he first developed his love of horses. He studied at Ravensboune College of Art, where he specialised in sculpture. Having left college, he went through a series of jobs. including working as a groom in a stables on Dartmoor, labouring on a building site and running a shoe shop, and it was not until the late 1960s that he returned to the art world, when he taught sculpture and painting to A-level students in Dorset. After five years as a teacher, his private commissions increased sufficiently to enable bun to devote all his tinie to painting. For two years he specialised in figure studies but he turned freelance in 1973 and was able to concentrate increasingly on equestrian subjects. His commissions have included work for many stables, owners and even for the Officers Mess of the Household Cavalry. A regular award winner, Grahain Isom was decorated by the American Academy of Equine Artists in every year from 1990-1993. In 1993 alone he received a trio ol a,s ards: Best Racing Picture, Best Sporting Picture and Most Popular Picture.

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This Week's Half Price Art

 Oberfeldwebel Albert Kerscher, commander of 2nd company 511 Heavy Tank Battalion aided by a Panzer IV, two Hetzers, a Kingtiger and a Pak gun, successfully defended against concerted Soviet air and armoured attacks, his action buying valuable time for the evacuation of German wounded from Pilau and scoring his 100th victory in the process.

Kerschers Defence of Neuhauser Forest by David Pentland. (GL)
Half Price! - £300.00
 On January 22nd 1879, during the Zulu War, the small British field hospital and supply depot at Rorkes Drift in Natal was the site of one of the most heroic military defences of all time. Manned by 140 troops of the 24th Regiment, led by Lieutenant John Chard of the Royal Engineers, the camp was attacke by a well-trained and well-equipped Zulu army of 4000 men, heartened by the great Zulu victory over the British forces at Isandhlwana earlier on the same day. The battle began in mid afternoon, when British remnants of the defeat at Isandhlwana struggled into the camp. Anticipating trouble, Chard set his small force to guard the perimeter fence but, when the Zulu attack began, the Zulus came faster than the British could shoot and the camp was soon overcome. The thatched roof of the hospital was fired by Zulu spears wrapped in burning grass and even some of the sick and the dying were dragged from their beds and pressed into the desperate hand-to-hand fighting. Eventually, Chard gave the order to withdraw from the perimeter and to take position in a smaller compound, protected by a hastily assembled barricade of boxes and it was from behind this barricade that the garrison fought for their lives throughout the night. After twelve hours of battle, the camp was destroyed, the hospital had burned to the ground, seventeen British lay dead and ten were wounded. However, the Zulus had been repulsed and over 400 of their men killed. The Battle of Rorkes Drift is one of the greatest examples of bravery and heroism in British military history. Nine men were awarded Distinguished Conduct Medals, and eleven, the most ever given for a single battle, received the highest military honour of all, the Victoria Cross.

Defence of Rorkes Drift by Lady Elizabeth Butler. (C)
Half Price! - £40.00
After the capture of the Magazine on 16th September 1857, at the Siege of Delhi, the mutineers staged a counter-attack. Several times they set light to the thatched roof adjacent to the perimeter wall. The actual Magazine was a building in the centre of the compound, but it had been blown up by the British earlier in the siege, leaving the perimeter wall intact. At that time there were buildings between the Magazine and the Red Fort. Lieutenant Renny of the Bengal Horse Artillery mounted the wall and flung 5.5 inch shells, with their fuses lit, into the midst of the enemy, although he was under heavy fire from the walls of the Palace (the Red Fort) and Selinghur (an outlying fortification). For this action he was later awarded the Victoria Cross.  I have depicted men of Renny's 5th (Native) Troop, 1st Brigade, Bengal Horse Artillery lighting shells with a portfire. Soldiers of the Belooch Regiment (in green uniforms) are handing these up to Renny. Other soldiers of HM's 61st Regiment, which had captured the Magazine that morning, are seen lining the wall and attempting to put out the fire in the compound. Some are in khaki and some in shirt sleeves.  In the hot weather at the Siege of Delhi, most British troops wore their white summer uniforms, often dyed locally to produce varying shades of khaki, sometimes described as a slate-grey blue colour. I have depicted Renny, who was 31 years old, with his pouch belt worn over his left shoulder, and his Undress sword belt (as described in the Standing Orders for the Bengal Horse Artillery). He and his men wore their forage caps with a cover and a neck curtain for protection from the sun.
Lt A Renny VC, Bengal Horse Artillery at the Delhi Magazine 1857 by David Rowlands. (GL)
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With the full might of Englands Army now gathered to do battle before the besieged Stirling Castle, the young Edward II Plantagenate is confident of victory over the enemy. To the west of the Bannockburn, Robert Bruce, King of Scots kneels to pray with his men and commends his soul to God. The Scottish battle lines are prepared. The Cavalry is in reserve to the rear behind the spearmen and archers (known as Flower of the forest) in tightly packed Schiltrons patiently awaiting the coming onslaught. Unknown to the English, the open marshy ground of no mans land conceals hidden pits and trenches, major obstacles for any mounted charge.  Despite Cliffords and de Beaumonts premature and unsuccessful attempt to relieve the castle the day before, years of victory have taught the brave English knights to regard their Scottish foes with contempt. So, without waiting for the bowmen to effectively weaken the enemy lines the order is hurriedly given to attack! With one rush hundreds of mounted knights led by the impetuous Earl of Gloucester thunder headlong through the boggy ground straight for the impenetrable forest of spears and into defeat and death.  With dash and courage the knights try to force a way through the mass of spears but the Scots stand firm. The momentum of the charge is lost and there is no room to manoeuvre. Everywhere horses and men crash to the ground, casualties amongst the English are horrific. Robert Bruce seizes the moment and orders the exultant army to advance. The Englishmen are slowly pushed back into the waters of the Bannockburn. All discipline is lost as the soldiers and horses madly scramble for the far bank of the burn. Many drown or perish in the crush to escape the deadly melee. Edward II, with his army destroyed, flees with his bodyguard for the safety of Stirling Castle but is refused refuge and has to fight his way south to England. For Robert Bruce and Scotland victory is complete.
Text by Paul Scarron-Jones.

Battle of Bannockburn by Mark Churms. (M)
Half Price! - £50.00

 British Somaliland, 1940.  Italian Carro Amato M11/39 tanks of the 'Compania Speciale Carri M' advance on the British held town of Zeila.  These where only one of two medium tank companies of 12 tanks each which were deployed in Africa Orientale (Ethiopia, Eritrea, and Somaliland) by the Italian Army.

The Road to Zeila by David Pentland. (P)
Half Price! - £650.00
 Private Robert Jones. Decorated for conspicuous bravery and devotion to the wounded at Rorkes drift. Private Robert and William Jones, posted in a room of the Hospital facing the hill, kept up a steady fire against enormous odds, and while one worked to cut a hole through the partition into the next room, the other shot Zulu after Zulu through the loophooled walls, using his own and his comrades rifle alternatively when the barrels became to hot to hold owing to the incessant firing. By their united heroic efforts six out of the seven patients were saved by being carried through the broken partition. the seventh, sergeant Maxwell being delirious, refused to be helped, and on Robert Jones returning to take him by force he found him being stabbed by the Zulus in his bed, Robert Jones died in 1898 in Peterchurch Herefordshire .  Both men were awarded the Victoria Cross.

Last Man Out by Mark Churms.
Half Price! - £75.00
DHM691.  Sir Walter Raleigh by Chris Collingwood.

Sir Walter Raleigh by Chris Collingwood.
Half Price! - £35.00
A Mastiff armoured personnel carrier leads a convoy of Transport Combat Service Battalion vehicles through the Sangin Valley, Afghanistan.

Convoy - Sangin Valley, Afghanistan by Graeme Lothian. (GL)
Half Price! - £300.00
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