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Cool Dawn by Graham Isom.


Cool Dawn by Graham Isom.

Graham Isoms latest limited edition print, Cool Dawn, is characteristic of the artists genius in rendering the sense of horses in motion. The image depicts the fairy-tale victory of Cool Dawn in the 1998 Cheltenham Gold Cup, which was run on Thursday March 20th 1998. In the race, the unfancied outsider beat Strong Promise well into second place and the favourite. Dorans Pride, into third. Trained in Dorset by Robert Alner and carrying the colours of owner, Dido Harding, Cool Dawns romantic story stunned the world of racing. Bought cheaply as a nice safe ladys ride - to be ridden by the owner in point-to-points, Cool Dawns victory in the Cheltenham Gold Cup brought him the most prized trophy from the major meeting in National Hunt racing. In training, Cool Dawn had shown early promise and eventually ran third in the Irish National. However, the ten year old was so little fancied for the Gold Cup that lie set off at odds of 25-1. His jockey. Andrew Thormon, made all the running throughout the race and Cool Dawns terrific staying power kept him ahead of the pack, and thus out of trouble, until challenged only after the last fence by Strong Promise. In an epic battle up the hill to the finishing fine, Cool Dawn gradually inched ahead to complete a fairy-tale three-day racing festival at Cheltenham in which equally romantic victories had been won by the popular grey. One Man, and by the Irish favourite, Istabraq.
Item Code : LIM0457Cool Dawn by Graham Isom. - This Edition
TYPEEDITION DETAILSSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSYOUR PRICEPURCHASING
PRINTLimited edition of 400 prints.

Image size 17 inches x 21 inches (43cm x 53cm)Artist : Graham Isom£94.00

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Artist Details : Graham Isom
Click here for a full list of all artwork by Graham Isom


Graham Isom

Graham Isom is possessed of what has been described by Horse and Hound magazine as a tremendous ability to paint horses in action. Graham Isom was born in 1945, in Kent. and brought up around his fathers riding school. where he first developed his love of horses. He studied at Ravensboune College of Art, where he specialised in sculpture. Having left college, he went through a series of jobs. including working as a groom in a stables on Dartmoor, labouring on a building site and running a shoe shop, and it was not until the late 1960s that he returned to the art world, when he taught sculpture and painting to A-level students in Dorset. After five years as a teacher, his private commissions increased sufficiently to enable bun to devote all his tinie to painting. For two years he specialised in figure studies but he turned freelance in 1973 and was able to concentrate increasingly on equestrian subjects. His commissions have included work for many stables, owners and even for the Officers Mess of the Household Cavalry. A regular award winner, Grahain Isom was decorated by the American Academy of Equine Artists in every year from 1990-1993. In 1993 alone he received a trio ol a,s ards: Best Racing Picture, Best Sporting Picture and Most Popular Picture.

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