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Cool Dawn by Graham Isom.

Cool Dawn by Graham Isom.

Graham Isoms latest limited edition print, Cool Dawn, is characteristic of the artists genius in rendering the sense of horses in motion. The image depicts the fairy-tale victory of Cool Dawn in the 1998 Cheltenham Gold Cup, which was run on Thursday March 20th 1998. In the race, the unfancied outsider beat Strong Promise well into second place and the favourite. Dorans Pride, into third. Trained in Dorset by Robert Alner and carrying the colours of owner, Dido Harding, Cool Dawns romantic story stunned the world of racing. Bought cheaply as a nice safe ladys ride - to be ridden by the owner in point-to-points, Cool Dawns victory in the Cheltenham Gold Cup brought him the most prized trophy from the major meeting in National Hunt racing. In training, Cool Dawn had shown early promise and eventually ran third in the Irish National. However, the ten year old was so little fancied for the Gold Cup that lie set off at odds of 25-1. His jockey. Andrew Thormon, made all the running throughout the race and Cool Dawns terrific staying power kept him ahead of the pack, and thus out of trouble, until challenged only after the last fence by Strong Promise. In an epic battle up the hill to the finishing fine, Cool Dawn gradually inched ahead to complete a fairy-tale three-day racing festival at Cheltenham in which equally romantic victories had been won by the popular grey. One Man, and by the Irish favourite, Istabraq.
Item Code : LIM0457Cool Dawn by Graham Isom. - This Edition
PRINTLimited edition of 400 prints.

Image size 17 inches x 21 inches (43cm x 53cm)Artist : Graham Isom£94.00

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Artist Details : Graham Isom
Click here for a full list of all artwork by Graham Isom

Graham Isom

Graham Isom is possessed of what has been described by Horse and Hound magazine as a tremendous ability to paint horses in action. Graham Isom was born in 1945, in Kent. and brought up around his fathers riding school. where he first developed his love of horses. He studied at Ravensboune College of Art, where he specialised in sculpture. Having left college, he went through a series of jobs. including working as a groom in a stables on Dartmoor, labouring on a building site and running a shoe shop, and it was not until the late 1960s that he returned to the art world, when he taught sculpture and painting to A-level students in Dorset. After five years as a teacher, his private commissions increased sufficiently to enable bun to devote all his tinie to painting. For two years he specialised in figure studies but he turned freelance in 1973 and was able to concentrate increasingly on equestrian subjects. His commissions have included work for many stables, owners and even for the Officers Mess of the Household Cavalry. A regular award winner, Grahain Isom was decorated by the American Academy of Equine Artists in every year from 1990-1993. In 1993 alone he received a trio ol a,s ards: Best Racing Picture, Best Sporting Picture and Most Popular Picture.

More about Graham Isom

This Week's Half Price Art

In 1895, Leander Starr Jameson assembled a private army outside the Transvaal with the aim of invading and overthrowing the Boer government.  The idea had been to encourage civil unrest among foreign workers (Uitlanders), and use the outbreak of open revolt as an excuse to invade and take over the territory.  But Jameson grew impatient and so launched the Jameson Raid on 29th December 1895, and managed to push within twenty miles of Johannesburg before superior Boer forces compelled him and his men to surrender at Doornkop on the 2nd of Janaury 1896.
Jameson's Last Stand, Battle of Doornkop 2nd January 1896 by Richard Caton Woodville
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The Wounded Cuirassier by Theodore Gericault.
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Battle of Agincourt, October 25th 1415.  Fought during the Hundred years war at the end of the English Invasion of 1415.  King Henry the V of England, after his conquest of Harfleur marched his army of 1,000 Knights and 5,000 Archers (many of which were Welsh) towards Calais. He marched to Amiens as flooding had affected the river at the Somme which was the direct route. This delay helped the French army of 20,000 strong under the command of the Constable Charles dAlbret and Marshal Jean Bouciquaut II. The French army blocked Henry V route to Calais, giving the English no choice but to fight. Henry V positioned his army at Agincourt, between to wooded areas giving a frontage of 1100 metres. Henry deployed his force into three divisions; each group had archers at each flank.  He had chosen his position well, in front of his army was ploughed fields and due to the heavy raid was very muddy.  Due to the narrow battlefield area the French army lost their advantage of superior numbers. At 11 oclock the English started to advance their archers within 2509 yards of the French, getting them into range of the French lines.  The French line of Cavalry advanced at a slow pass due to the heavy mud, They took heavy losses from the arrows from the English Long Bowman.  They were eventually repulsed by the Archers who as the French cavalry approached changed from using longbows for axes and swords.  The French second Cavalry line advanced only to be finally repulsed after hand to hand fighting. The commander Duc dAlencon was killed in the attack.   The second charge had failed and many of the French knights were taken prisoner.  Believing he had been attacked in the rear Henry V ordered that the prisoners were to be put to death. In fact There was no real rear attack it was French Camp followers plundering the English Camp.  The French camp followers were quickly dealt with and the English again prepared itself for the next attack. The third attack never materialized as the sight of so much blood shed and piles of  corpses  turned the charge into a retreat.  The English had won the day with losses less than 1600 compared to the French losses of over 7,000,  including the capture of Bouciquaut.  Henry V,  his way now cleared reached Calais on the 16th November 1415.  Agincourt  is one of the great battles of military history, and this victory enabled Henry V to return to France in 1417 and conquer all of Normandy.

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