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At the Forge by Peter Deighan

At the Forge by Peter Deighan

At The Forge Dawn Run, the magnificent mare, who was the winner of both the Champion hurdle and the Cheltenham Gold Cup.
Item Code : SSP0064At the Forge by Peter Deighan - This Edition
PRINT Signed limited edition of 350 prints.

Image size 19.5 inches x 15.5 inches (49cm x 39cm)Artist : Peter Deighan£140.00

All prices on our website are displayed in British Pounds Sterling

Artist Details : Peter Deighan
Click here for a full list of all artwork by Peter Deighan

Peter Deighan

Peter Deighan was born in the county town of Monaghan, Ireland in 1941. It was while helping out on his uncle#39;s farm as a young lad he developed an affinity with horses which has remained with him through his adult life. As a 16-year-old Peter Deighan left Ireland to work in England and got a job as a trainee welder at Vauxhall Motors car plant in Luton, Bedfordshire. This work did little to satisfy his emerging creative talent. However, during this time Peter won an amateur art competition and was offered a scholarship at the Slade College of Art in London. Peter's raw artistic talent was quickly recognised and he began to receive commissions, including one from the Duke of Bedford. Peter held his first one-man exhibition in the Duke's stately home, Woburn Abbey. Among his earlier commissions were portraits of the comedian Eric Morecambe, footballer Jimmy Greaves, speaker of the house of Commons Selwyn Lloyd and Cardinal Basil Hume Archbishop of Westminister. Following the unqualified success of his one-man show, Peter became a full time artist, devoting all his energies and creativity to his main passion in life, painting. He was also able to combine his love of painting with his passion for horses. Peter quickly established a reputation as one of the world's leading equestrian artists. He received commissions from prominent members of the racing fraternity, including Dr and Mrs Vincent O'Brien, Mr and Mrs JP McManus, Mr and Mrs Robert Sangster, Captain and Mrs John MacDonald-Buchanan, and Sheikh Mohammed Al-Maktoum. So impressed were his patrons that they also commissioned Peter to paint their close family members. Among those who now hang a Deighan family portrait in their homes are the McManus, the Magnier and the Sangster families. Peter Deighan also painted the official portrait of the British Prime Minster John Major, thriller writer Frederick Forsyth (after meeting him on the Gay Byrne Late Late Show in Dublin), footballer Jimmy Greaves, snooker champion Steve Davis and boxer Barry McGuigan. He has had his paintings displayed in the annual exhibitions of the Royal Society of Portrait Painters and the Society of Equestrian Artists in London. Being such a talented and versatile painter, Peter turned his attention to some of his other interests in life. Following visits to southern Africa he painted a series of wildlife studies. His paintings of the indigenous population were particularly evocative. As Peter's reputation as one of the world's leading portrait painters grew, he began to receive commissions from North America. His most notable patrons included Payne Stewart. Peter visited Payne Stewart's home in Florida to paint a family group portrait. It was during his visit to Florida that Peter met and was commissioned to paint Tiger Woods and Mark O'Meara. Shortly after the tragic death of Payne Stewart, one of Peter's portraits of the golfer fetched 1.4 million at a JP McManus Charity auction. In 2005 Peter's painting of the Irish Ryder Cup players, a painting of Tiger Woods and Mark O'Meara were sold for similar sums at auction. Peter was commissioned to paint the 2006 European Ryder Cup players by Dr Michael Smurfit, for the K Club. Cranston Fine Arts are proud to offer Peter Deighan art prints direct to the public as part of its massive sporting range.

More about Peter Deighan

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