Customer Helpline
(UK) : 01436 820269

Shipping Rates
Valuation of Your Collection

You currently have no items in your basket

Choose a FREE print if you spend over £220!
See Choice of Free Prints

Join us on Facebook!

Buy with confidence and security!
Publishing historical art since 1985

Follow us on Twitter!


Product Search        

Seventh Heaven by Peter Deighan

Seventh Heaven by Peter Deighan

AMAZING VALUE! - The value of the signatures on this item is in excess of the price of the print itself!
Item Code : SSP0045Seventh Heaven by Peter Deighan - This Edition
PRINT Signed limited edition of 950 prints.

Image size 16 inches x 16 inches (41cm x 41cm)Artist : Peter DeighanSOLD
All prices on our website are displayed in British Pounds Sterling

Artist Details : Peter Deighan
Click here for a full list of all artwork by Peter Deighan

Peter Deighan

Peter Deighan was born in the county town of Monaghan, Ireland in 1941. It was while helping out on his uncle#39;s farm as a young lad he developed an affinity with horses which has remained with him through his adult life. As a 16-year-old Peter Deighan left Ireland to work in England and got a job as a trainee welder at Vauxhall Motors car plant in Luton, Bedfordshire. This work did little to satisfy his emerging creative talent. However, during this time Peter won an amateur art competition and was offered a scholarship at the Slade College of Art in London. Peter's raw artistic talent was quickly recognised and he began to receive commissions, including one from the Duke of Bedford. Peter held his first one-man exhibition in the Duke's stately home, Woburn Abbey. Among his earlier commissions were portraits of the comedian Eric Morecambe, footballer Jimmy Greaves, speaker of the house of Commons Selwyn Lloyd and Cardinal Basil Hume Archbishop of Westminister. Following the unqualified success of his one-man show, Peter became a full time artist, devoting all his energies and creativity to his main passion in life, painting. He was also able to combine his love of painting with his passion for horses. Peter quickly established a reputation as one of the world's leading equestrian artists. He received commissions from prominent members of the racing fraternity, including Dr and Mrs Vincent O'Brien, Mr and Mrs JP McManus, Mr and Mrs Robert Sangster, Captain and Mrs John MacDonald-Buchanan, and Sheikh Mohammed Al-Maktoum. So impressed were his patrons that they also commissioned Peter to paint their close family members. Among those who now hang a Deighan family portrait in their homes are the McManus, the Magnier and the Sangster families. Peter Deighan also painted the official portrait of the British Prime Minster John Major, thriller writer Frederick Forsyth (after meeting him on the Gay Byrne Late Late Show in Dublin), footballer Jimmy Greaves, snooker champion Steve Davis and boxer Barry McGuigan. He has had his paintings displayed in the annual exhibitions of the Royal Society of Portrait Painters and the Society of Equestrian Artists in London. Being such a talented and versatile painter, Peter turned his attention to some of his other interests in life. Following visits to southern Africa he painted a series of wildlife studies. His paintings of the indigenous population were particularly evocative. As Peter's reputation as one of the world's leading portrait painters grew, he began to receive commissions from North America. His most notable patrons included Payne Stewart. Peter visited Payne Stewart's home in Florida to paint a family group portrait. It was during his visit to Florida that Peter met and was commissioned to paint Tiger Woods and Mark O'Meara. Shortly after the tragic death of Payne Stewart, one of Peter's portraits of the golfer fetched 1.4 million at a JP McManus Charity auction. In 2005 Peter's painting of the Irish Ryder Cup players, a painting of Tiger Woods and Mark O'Meara were sold for similar sums at auction. Peter was commissioned to paint the 2006 European Ryder Cup players by Dr Michael Smurfit, for the K Club. Cranston Fine Arts are proud to offer Peter Deighan art prints direct to the public as part of its massive sporting range.

More about Peter Deighan

This Week's Half Price Art

 Lt. John Rouse Merriot Chard, Royal Engineers.At about 3.30 on the afternoon of 22nd January 1879, Lieutenant John Rouse Merriot Chard, Royal Engineers, was supervising repairs on the military pont on the Mzinyathi river, at the border crossing at Rorkes Drift, when survivors brought news  that the advanced British camp at Isandhlwana had been over-run by the Zulus, and that a wing of the Zulu army was on its way to attack Rorkes Drift. Chard ordered Driver Robson to pack up the wagon and return to the mission station, where a stockpile of supplies was under the guard of B Company, 2/24th Regiment. Chard, in consultation with his fellow officers, made the historic decision to make a stand at Rorkes Drift.

Eve of Distinction by Mark Churms.
Half Price! - £28.00
 The Old Guard being asked to surrender at the end of the Battle of Waterloo.
The Last Stand of the Old Guard by Robert Hillingford. (Y)
Half Price! - £20.00
 After almost two months of continuous fighting in the front line, remnants of the 12th SS Panzer Division, Hitler Jugend, fall back under incessant air attacks by allied fighter bombers for their final battles in France. In their defense of the northern flank of what is to become the Falaise Gap the new Jagdpanzer IV in particular is to prove a formidable foe to the attacking British and Canadian tanks.

The Falaise Gap, Normandy, 12th - 20th August 1944 by David Pentland.
Half Price! - £100.00
 Background battle detail shows 15th Hussars in summer campaign dress.

Lt General Lord Wellington at Salamanca, 22nd July 1812 by Chris Collingwood. (Y)
Half Price! - £50.00

With the full might of Englands Army now gathered to do battle before the besieged Stirling Castle, the young Edward II Plantagenate is confident of victory over the enemy. To the west of the Bannockburn, Robert Bruce, King of Scots kneels to pray with his men and commends his soul to God. The Scottish battle lines are prepared. The Cavalry is in reserve to the rear behind the spearmen and archers (known as Flower of the forest) in tightly packed Schiltrons patiently awaiting the coming onslaught. Unknown to the English, the open marshy ground of no mans land conceals hidden pits and trenches, major obstacles for any mounted charge.  Despite Cliffords and de Beaumonts premature and unsuccessful attempt to relieve the castle the day before, years of victory have taught the brave English knights to regard their Scottish foes with contempt. So, without waiting for the bowmen to effectively weaken the enemy lines the order is hurriedly given to attack! With one rush hundreds of mounted knights led by the impetuous Earl of Gloucester thunder headlong through the boggy ground straight for the impenetrable forest of spears and into defeat and death.  With dash and courage the knights try to force a way through the mass of spears but the Scots stand firm. The momentum of the charge is lost and there is no room to manoeuvre. Everywhere horses and men crash to the ground, casualties amongst the English are horrific. Robert Bruce seizes the moment and orders the exultant army to advance. The Englishmen are slowly pushed back into the waters of the Bannockburn. All discipline is lost as the soldiers and horses madly scramble for the far bank of the burn. Many drown or perish in the crush to escape the deadly melee. Edward II, with his army destroyed, flees with his bodyguard for the safety of Stirling Castle but is refused refuge and has to fight his way south to England. For Robert Bruce and Scotland victory is complete.
Text by Paul Scarron-Jones.

Battle of Bannockburn by Mark Churms. (M)
Half Price! - £45.00
 Knowing that the battle of Bannockburn was lost, the Earl of Pembroke and Sir Giles d'Argentan led King Edward the 2nd from the field in much haste.  King Edward and his bodyguard had to fight their way through the Scots, who barred their escape.  King Edward had one horse killed under him, and only the heroic resistance of the earl of Pembroke's bodyguard prevented the Scots from capturing the English King.

King Edward II's Retreat from Bannockburn by Jason Askew.
Half Price! - £70.00
 Sturmgeschutz IIIg and Paratroops of the 4th Fallschirmjager Division, driving to the front line, pass one of the two giant 28cm K5 (Eisenbaum) railway guns responsible for the shelling the Allied beacheads at Anzio and Nettuno.

Anzio Annie, Italy, 29th January 1944 by David Pentland. (GS)
Half Price! - £250.00
  With Edward I absent from Scotland the land soon slips once more into open insurrection. Though not of noble birth, William Wallace, by brutally slaying the Sheriff of Lanark in vengeance for the murder of Wallaces new bride and her servants, soon comes to embody the Scottish Nationalist cause. Through his popularity and military skill, he is able to rapidly unify the rebellious bands into a single, cohesive fighting force. An English army is sent north to defeat the Scots and capture Wallace and the only noble to come to Wallaces assistance, is his friend Andrew Murray. Other Scottish landowners are too timid and fear the consequences.  The armies meet at Stirling and the English begin to deploy across the narrow wooden bridge which spans the River Forth. Whilst the English commanders bicker about their battle plan, Wallace seizes the moment and blows his horn. Upon this signal, the massed ranks of Scottish spearmen charge forward across the open boggy ground towards the bridge!

William Wallace Before the Battle of Stirling Bridge by Mark Churms.
Half Price! - £50.00
          Home / View All Products                       View Your Basket