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This Week's Half Price Art

On July 1st 1862 in Henrico County Virginia, the battle of Malvern Hill, also known as the Battle of Poindexters Farm, took place,  The battle of Malvern Hill was last of six battles fought in seven days wich are known as the Seven Day battles of the Peninsula Campaign.  Gen.Robert E Lee launched a series of assaults on the nearly impregnable Union troop position on Malvern Hill.  The Confederate forces  suffered more than 5,300 casualties without any success.  Although the Union forces had won, Major George B McClellan withdrew from his strong position to entrench his army at Harrison Landing on the James River where the Union troops would be protected from the sea by Union Gunboats.

Union Artillery at the Battle of Malvern Hill., July 1862 by Chris Collingwood.
Half Price! - £70.00
 Depicting the Light Brigade at the moment of reaching the Russian guns. Shown are the 11th Hussars and the 17th Lancers.  The all time classic image of the disastrous  Charge of the Light Brigade which included the 17th lancers, who lead the charge.  Lord Cardigan is shown on the left, dressed in his 11th Hussars uniform.   The Light Brigade were being kept in reserve, after the successful charge of the heavy brigade, but the slow advance of the British Infantry to take advantage of the heavy brigades success had given the Russian forces time to take away Artillery pieces from captured redoubts.  Raglan, after seeing this ordered the light brigade to advance rapidly to the front, follow the enemy and try to prevent the enemy carrying away the guns. This message taken by Captain Nolan, to Lord Lucan, the cavalry Commander.  One of the Officers of Raglans Staff, urged Lucan, who could only see the main Russian Artillery position at the head of a valley.  Lord Lucan rode over to Cardigan and ordered him to attack these guns.  So the Light Brigade charged these Russian guns, and not the guns being taken away by Russian forces from the redoubts. The carnage was great, from the 673 men who started the charge, 113 men were killed and many others wounded. The Light Brigade was made up of the 4th and 13th Light Dragoons, 8th and 11th Hussars and the 17th Lancers. A spectating French Officer General Pierre Bosquet proclaimed - It is magnificent but it is not war.

Relief of the Light Brigade by Richard Caton Woodville. (Y)
Half Price! - £30.00
 Depicting one of the nighttime Zulu attacks  on Rorkes Drift.  The South Wales Borderers defend the outpost by the light of the burning hospital building.

Night of the Zulu by Bud Bradshaw. (AP)
Half Price! - £160.00
 Acting Assistant Commissary J.L. Dalton commissariat and transport department and colour sergeant F. Bourne, during the battle at the front wall about 6pm at Rorkes Drift. Frank Bourne was born  on the 27th April 1854  in Balcombe Sussex, when Bourne was 18 he joined the 24th Regiment in 1872, being promoted to Corporal in 1875 and Sergeant in 1878.  Sergeant Bourne was promoted to Colour Sergeant soon after the rgeiment arrived in Natal.  Colour Sgt bourne was part of B company whose job was to guard the hospital at Rorkes Drift.  Colour Sgt Bourne played a major role in keeping the defending troops effective.  Colour Sgt Bourne was awarded the Distinguished Conduct Medal for his role in the defence, and it is surprising that he was not awarded a Victoria Cross as 11 were awarded for the defence. Col Sgt Bourne retired form the army in 1907, but  joined again for WW1, serving in Dublin.  He was the last survivor of Rorkes Drift, passing away at the age of 91 on the 8th May 1945 by coincidence being VE day.

Pot That Fellow by Mark Churms.
Half Price! - £28.00

DHM558.  Furling the Flag by Richard Brooke.
Furling the Flag by Richard Brooke.
Half Price! - £33.00
DHM601.  The Battle of Marston Moor by J. Barker.
The Battle of Marston Moor by J. Barker.
Half Price! - £28.00
9th (Irish) Field Battery firing on the Run-in-shoot to Queen Beach. They were the first rounds fired at the Normandy Coast, D-Day 6th June, 1944. Queen Beach, one of the 4 sectors of Sword Beach, where most of the landings of D-Day were carried out. The Queen Beach sector which extended for 1.5km between Lion-sur-Mer and the western edge of Ouistretham. The attack was thus concentrated on a narrow one-brigade front. For once the DD tanks and other armour came in exactly on time and ahead of the infantry. The 8th brigade, with the 1st Battalion of the South Lancashire Regiment on the right and the 2nd East Yorkshire on the left.

Operation Overlord by David Rowlands (B)
Half Price! - £20.00
 Men of the US 381st Infantry Regiment, 96th Division supported by the tanks of 763rd and 713th Flamethrower Tank Battalions, during the assault on Yaeju Dake. This escarpment, known as Big Apple was the last in a series of tough Japanese defence lines on the south of the Island.

Taking of Big Apple, Okinawa, 10th - 14th June 1945 by David Pentland. (GL)
Half Price! - £300.00
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