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This Week's Half Price Art

 Depicting Private Hook and Private Williams, B Company, 2nd Battalion, 24th Foot inside the burning hospital at Rorkes Drift, 7pm January 1879. At about 6 pm the Zulus first forced their way into the hospital building where some thirty patients were defended by a handful of able-bodied men. A running fight ensued as the patients were evacuated from room to room, a desperate struggle made all the more terrible when the Zulus set fire to the thatched roof. Here Private Alfred Henry Hook holds Zulus of the uThulwana regiment at bay whilst Private John Williams helps a patient escape, Hook received a head wound when a spear struck off his helmet.

Pinned Like Rats in a Hole by Mark Churms. (P)
Half Price! - £4600.00
 The Battle of Ulundi took place at the Zulu capital of Ulundi on 4th July 1879. Ulundi became the last battle to be fought during the Zulu war and the British victory finally broke the military power of the Zulu Nation. The battle began at 6 a.m. when Buller led out an advance guard of mounted troops and South African irregulars. The British force comprised of five companies of the 80th regiment in square in four ranks, with two Gatling Guns in the centres, two 9-pounders on the left flank and two 7-pounders on the right. The 90th Light Infantry with four companies of the 94th regiment made up the left face with two more 7-pounders. On the right face were the 1st Battalion of the 13th Light Infantry, four companies of the 58th Regiment, two 7-pounders and two 9-pounders. The rear face was composed of two companies of the 94th Regiment and two companies of the 2nd Battalion of the 21st Regiment. In the middle of the square were headquarters staff, No. 5 company of the Royal Engineers whhich was led by Lt John Chard who had commanded the troops at Rorkes Drift, the 2nd Native Natal Contingent, fifty wagons and carts with reserve ammunition and hospital wagons. Bullers horsemen protected the front and both flanks of the square. A rearguard of two squadrons of the 17th Lancers and a troop of Natal Native Horse followed. In total the British force stood at just over 5300 against the Zulu warrior regiments in total over 15000. The Zulu warriors charged again and again at the square but with the strong British firepower of tifle and gatling gun, they could not get close. As the Zulu warriors strength weakened, Lord Chelmsford ordered the cavalry to mount, and the 17th Lancers and the 1st Kings Dragoon Guards along with colonial cavalry were ordered to charge the now fleeing Zulus. The Zulus fled towards the high ground with the cavalry in pursuit. The Lancers were checked at the Mbilane stream by the fire of a concealed party of Zulus, causing a number casualties before the 17th Lancers overcame the Zulu resistance. The pursuit continued until not one living Zulu remained on the Mahlabatini plain, with members of the Natal Native Horse, Natal Native Contingent and Woods Irregulars slaughtering the Zulu wounded, done in revenge for the massacre at Isandlwana.

The Death or Glory Boys by Bud Bradshaw. (Y)
Half Price! - £100.00
Located in Helmund Province Musa Qaleh - district centre occupies a central base surrounded by forward observation bases (FOB's)  From one of the rooftops looking down below, can be seen various units which occupy the base.  The Infantry, the dog handlers, REME, Royal Engineers, Police mentoring teams, Postal Services, medics, ANA (Afghan National Army) and ANP (Afghan National Police)

Musa Qaleh, Helmand Province, Afghanistan by Graeme Lothian. (GM)
Half Price! - £300.00
The fourth release of Ernest Crofts Waterloo series.  Napoleon is seen with his generals as his faithfull Guard regiments (held in reserve) pass him on their way to the last French attack on the British lines during the last stages of the Battle of Waterloo. Painted in 1895 and was last sold at Sothebys London.

Napoleons Last Grand Attack by Ernest Crofts.
Half Price! - £33.00

Captain W Macleods Company, 1st Battalion Royal Artillery. Battle of Quebec 13th September 1759 was Wolfs final attempt to take the city. His army scaled the cliffs from Wolfes cove and fought the French army which was larger than Wolfes on the Plains of Abraham. During this battle General Wolfe was hit twice  and eventually mortally wounded when a bullet passed through his lungs. As he lay dying he heard someone shout They run - see how they run. Wolfe gave his last order to cut of the enemies retreat and his last words being Now God be praised. I will die in peace.

The Battle of Quebec, 13th September 1759 by David Rowlands (GL)
Half Price! - £300.00
The younger Charles, after escaping the Worcester rout, is hiding in a pollard oak, with the Roundheads hunting for him.
The Boscobol Oak, By Ernest Crofts. (Y)
Half Price! - £30.00
20 September 1854: The first battle of the Crimean War took place when the British and French attacked the Russians who held a formidable position on the steep slope above the River Alma. The 33rd was the centre regiment of the 1st Brigade, which was ordered to advance across the river and into the direction of the 'Great Redoubt', an entrenched position which the Russians had dug to form a protective earth bank. This position held as many as 16 battalions and 14 heavy guns. Marching steadily uphill, under artillery and musket fire, the 7th, 23rd and 33rd Regiments, despite losing their line formation, reached their objective and leapt into the Great Redoubt cheering as they did so. The Russian infantry were formed in a deep mass, and the two sides blazed away at each other at short range. The British carried the position most gallantly, and after a fierce struggle drove the Russians out. Three officers in succession had been shot while carrying the Colours of the 33rd.  Captain Wallis described how, as the Russian gunners furiously struggled to withdraw their guns, a private of the 33rd spotted one being limbered up. Two horses were already attached, but he managed to seize the gun and bring it away. Sir George Brown, commanding the Light Division , had seen his action and ordered Colonel Blake to promote him to sergeant for his gallant conduct.  The Light Division had been so mauled and disordered that a Russian counter-attack drove it back from the Great Redoubt, but the Guards and the Highland Brigade coming up at last drove the enemy from the battlefield.  The 33rd suffered more casualties than any other British regiment engaged. Colonel Blake's horse was wounded in three places.

The 33rd (Duke of Wellingtons) Regiment storming the Great Redoubt at the Battle of Alma, 20th September 1854 by David Rowlands (GL)
Half Price! - £300.00
Rome AD52, Gladiatorial Combat under the eyes of the Emperor Claudius (actual name, Tiberius Claudius Drusus Nero) a great supporter of the games. Seen are the Net and Trident fighter Retiarius matched with a more heavily armed Mirmillone, whilst in the background a successful Secutor seeks permission for the killing stroke.

Morituri Te Saluttant (For Those About to Die Salute You) by Chris Collingwood.
Half Price! - £70.00
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