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Galileo by Peter Deighan


Galileo by Peter Deighan

Item Code : PDHO0003Galileo by Peter Deighan - This Edition
TYPEEDITION DETAILSSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSYOUR PRICEPURCHASING
PRINT Signed limited edition of 500 prints. Image size 11.5 inches x 15 inches (29cm x 38cm)Artist : Peter Deighan90.00

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Artist Details : Peter Deighan
Click here for a full list of all artwork by Peter Deighan


Peter Deighan

Peter Deighan was born in the county town of Monaghan, Ireland in 1941. It was while helping out on his uncle#39;s farm as a young lad he developed an affinity with horses which has remained with him through his adult life. As a 16-year-old Peter Deighan left Ireland to work in England and got a job as a trainee welder at Vauxhall Motors car plant in Luton, Bedfordshire. This work did little to satisfy his emerging creative talent. However, during this time Peter won an amateur art competition and was offered a scholarship at the Slade College of Art in London. Peter's raw artistic talent was quickly recognised and he began to receive commissions, including one from the Duke of Bedford. Peter held his first one-man exhibition in the Duke's stately home, Woburn Abbey. Among his earlier commissions were portraits of the comedian Eric Morecambe, footballer Jimmy Greaves, speaker of the house of Commons Selwyn Lloyd and Cardinal Basil Hume Archbishop of Westminister. Following the unqualified success of his one-man show, Peter became a full time artist, devoting all his energies and creativity to his main passion in life, painting. He was also able to combine his love of painting with his passion for horses. Peter quickly established a reputation as one of the world's leading equestrian artists. He received commissions from prominent members of the racing fraternity, including Dr and Mrs Vincent O'Brien, Mr and Mrs JP McManus, Mr and Mrs Robert Sangster, Captain and Mrs John MacDonald-Buchanan, and Sheikh Mohammed Al-Maktoum. So impressed were his patrons that they also commissioned Peter to paint their close family members. Among those who now hang a Deighan family portrait in their homes are the McManus, the Magnier and the Sangster families. Peter Deighan also painted the official portrait of the British Prime Minster John Major, thriller writer Frederick Forsyth (after meeting him on the Gay Byrne Late Late Show in Dublin), footballer Jimmy Greaves, snooker champion Steve Davis and boxer Barry McGuigan. He has had his paintings displayed in the annual exhibitions of the Royal Society of Portrait Painters and the Society of Equestrian Artists in London. Being such a talented and versatile painter, Peter turned his attention to some of his other interests in life. Following visits to southern Africa he painted a series of wildlife studies. His paintings of the indigenous population were particularly evocative. As Peter's reputation as one of the world's leading portrait painters grew, he began to receive commissions from North America. His most notable patrons included Payne Stewart. Peter visited Payne Stewart's home in Florida to paint a family group portrait. It was during his visit to Florida that Peter met and was commissioned to paint Tiger Woods and Mark O'Meara. Shortly after the tragic death of Payne Stewart, one of Peter's portraits of the golfer fetched 1.4 million at a JP McManus Charity auction. In 2005 Peter's painting of the Irish Ryder Cup players, a painting of Tiger Woods and Mark O'Meara were sold for similar sums at auction. Peter was commissioned to paint the 2006 European Ryder Cup players by Dr Michael Smurfit, for the K Club. Cranston Fine Arts are proud to offer Peter Deighan art prints direct to the public as part of its massive sporting range.

More about Peter Deighan

This Week's Half Price Art

 Although outnumbered ten to one, General Arthur Wellesley defeated the well trained Mahratta army in one of the fiercest battles in India. It was the first of many victories by the future Duke of Wellington, and the bloodiest for the number, he recalled, that I ever saw.

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 1st Battalion in action at Escaut Canal, Belgium, May 1940. The last Highland Regiment to wear a kilt in battle, attacking the Germans at the River Escaut.  From the Diary of Captain R. Leah, 1st Battalion, Queen's Own Cameron Highlanders : Tuesday 21st May : Bn left Ere about 2 a.m. to march back. Fortunately Coy Cmdr. were required for some sort of recce and we went in C.O.s car.  Arrived Taintignies 3 a.m. and self went out again with Wilkie in C.O.s car to look for for C Coy which had gone astray, and to see Q.M. about Bn rations in Wez-Velvain.  Could not find either.  Met the Battalion arriving from Ere when I left the village at 3 a.m.  Got back myself at 4 a.m. found empty house which I entered by window and slept well for 5 hours. Officers mess going in house beside M.T. park, and had good breakfast.  Fairly quiet morning and orders to move this afternoon to Bn assembly position S of Wez-Velvain.  Thence we were directed to Merlin and prepared for counter-attack to drive enemy off Western side of Escaut.

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Assault on Iraqi Artillery Positions, 3rd Fusiliers Battle Group by David Rowlands. (GL)
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 Baron de Donops Brigade at the Battle of Waterloo, 5.30pm, 18th June 1815.  After four hours of fighting, the squadrons of Napoleons 3rd Cavalry Corps finally join the massed assaults on the battered allied infantry squares.  With the 42 year old marechal de camp Frederic-Guillaume de Donop at their head, the 2nd and 3rd Cuirassier Regiments break from a trot into a canter as they clear the ridge.  The heavy cavalry are smashed against the steadfast bayonets of the redcoats and countercharged by light horsemen.  In one of these encounters the general himself is terribly wounded and falls from his horse. His son (aide-de-camp) is also injured.  Both are reported missing and presumed captured.  Although the generals body is not found,it is certain that he met his death in the muddy fields of Waterloo alongside many of his brigade.  In 1895 his name is inscribed on the north face of LArc de Triomphe in Paris in recognition of his service to France.

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2nd Maryland Regiment at the Guildford Courthouse 1781 by Brian Palmer.
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 Battle of Agincourt, October 25th 1415. Fought during the Hundred years war at the end of the English Invasion of 1415. King Henry the V of England, after his conquest of Harfleur marched his army of 1,000 Knights and 5,000 Archers (many of which were Welsh) towards Calais. He marched to Amiens as flooding had affected the river at the Somme which was the direct route. This delay helped the French army of 20,000 strong under the command of the Constable Charles dAlbret and Marshal Jean Bouciquaut II. The French army blocked Henry V route to Calais, giving the English no choice but to fight. Henry V positioned his army at Agincourt, between to wooded areas giving a frontage of 1100 metres. Henry deployed his force into three divisions; each group had archers at each flank. He had chosen his position well, in front of his army was ploughed fields and due to the heavy raid was very muddy. Due to the narrow battlefield area the French army lost their advantage of superior numbers. At 11 oclock the English started to advance their archers within 2509 yards of the French, getting them into range of the French lines. The French line of Cavalry advanced at a slow pass due to the heavy mud, They took heavy losses from the arrows from the English Long Bowman. They were eventually repulsed by the Archers who as the French cavalry approached changed from using longbows for axes and swords. The French second Cavalry line advanced only to be finally repulsed after hand to hand fighting. The commander Duc dAlencon was killed in the attack. The second charge had failed and many of the French knights were taken prisoner. Believing he had been attacked in the rear Henry V ordered that the prisoners were to be put to death. In fact There was no real rear attack it was French Camp followers plundering the English Camp. The French camp followers were quickly dealt with and the English again prepared itself for the next attack. The third attack never materialized as the sight of so much blood shed and piles of corpses turned the charge into a retreat. The English had won the day with losses less than 1600 compared to the French losses of over 7,000, including the capture of Bouciquaut. Henry V, his way now cleared reached Calais on the 16th November 1415. Agincourt is one of the great battles of military history, and this victory enabled Henry V to return to France in 1417 and conquer all of Normandy.

Morning of Agincourt by Sir John Gilbert. (Y)
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