Customer Helpline
(UK) : 01436 820269

Shipping Rates
Valuation of Your Collection

You currently have no items in your basket


FREE worldwide shipping for orders over £150

Join us on Facebook!


Buy with confidence and security!
Publishing historical art since 1985

Follow us on Twitter!

AMAZING VALUE SPECIAL OFFERS !

VIEW ALL OF OUR CURRENT SPECIAL OFFERS HERE!
 
Product Search        
Massive savings on this month's big offers including our BUY ONE GET ONE HALF PRICE offer on many prints, many others at HALF PRICE or with FREE PRINTS and all orders over £150 get FREE WORLDWIDE SHIPPING!
Many of our offers end in 17 hours, 18 minutes!

Kinanes Heroes by Peter Deighan


Kinanes Heroes by Peter Deighan

Item Code : PDHO0001Kinanes Heroes by Peter Deighan - This Edition
TYPEEDITION DETAILSSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSYOUR PRICEPURCHASING
PRINT Signed limited edition of 350 prints. Image size 21 inches x 12.5 inches 53cm x 32cm Kinane, Michael
+ Artist : Peter Deighan


Signature(s) value alone : £15
£130.00

Quantity:
All prices on our website are displayed in British Pounds Sterling


Signatures on this item
*The value given for each signature has been calculated by us based on the historical significance and rarity of the signature. Values of many pilot signatures have risen in recent years and will likely continue to rise as they become more and more rare.
NameInfo
Michael Kinane
*Signature Value : £15

Jockey
Artist Details : Peter Deighan
Click here for a full list of all artwork by Peter Deighan


Peter Deighan

Peter Deighan was born in the county town of Monaghan, Ireland in 1941. It was while helping out on his uncle#39;s farm as a young lad he developed an affinity with horses which has remained with him through his adult life. As a 16-year-old Peter Deighan left Ireland to work in England and got a job as a trainee welder at Vauxhall Motors car plant in Luton, Bedfordshire. This work did little to satisfy his emerging creative talent. However, during this time Peter won an amateur art competition and was offered a scholarship at the Slade College of Art in London. Peter's raw artistic talent was quickly recognised and he began to receive commissions, including one from the Duke of Bedford. Peter held his first one-man exhibition in the Duke's stately home, Woburn Abbey. Among his earlier commissions were portraits of the comedian Eric Morecambe, footballer Jimmy Greaves, speaker of the house of Commons Selwyn Lloyd and Cardinal Basil Hume Archbishop of Westminister. Following the unqualified success of his one-man show, Peter became a full time artist, devoting all his energies and creativity to his main passion in life, painting. He was also able to combine his love of painting with his passion for horses. Peter quickly established a reputation as one of the world's leading equestrian artists. He received commissions from prominent members of the racing fraternity, including Dr and Mrs Vincent O'Brien, Mr and Mrs JP McManus, Mr and Mrs Robert Sangster, Captain and Mrs John MacDonald-Buchanan, and Sheikh Mohammed Al-Maktoum. So impressed were his patrons that they also commissioned Peter to paint their close family members. Among those who now hang a Deighan family portrait in their homes are the McManus, the Magnier and the Sangster families. Peter Deighan also painted the official portrait of the British Prime Minster John Major, thriller writer Frederick Forsyth (after meeting him on the Gay Byrne Late Late Show in Dublin), footballer Jimmy Greaves, snooker champion Steve Davis and boxer Barry McGuigan. He has had his paintings displayed in the annual exhibitions of the Royal Society of Portrait Painters and the Society of Equestrian Artists in London. Being such a talented and versatile painter, Peter turned his attention to some of his other interests in life. Following visits to southern Africa he painted a series of wildlife studies. His paintings of the indigenous population were particularly evocative. As Peter's reputation as one of the world's leading portrait painters grew, he began to receive commissions from North America. His most notable patrons included Payne Stewart. Peter visited Payne Stewart's home in Florida to paint a family group portrait. It was during his visit to Florida that Peter met and was commissioned to paint Tiger Woods and Mark O'Meara. Shortly after the tragic death of Payne Stewart, one of Peter's portraits of the golfer fetched 1.4 million at a JP McManus Charity auction. In 2005 Peter's painting of the Irish Ryder Cup players, a painting of Tiger Woods and Mark O'Meara were sold for similar sums at auction. Peter was commissioned to paint the 2006 European Ryder Cup players by Dr Michael Smurfit, for the K Club. Cranston Fine Arts are proud to offer Peter Deighan art prints direct to the public as part of its massive sporting range.

More about Peter Deighan

This Week's Half Price Art

Sir Henry Paget, Earl of Uxbridge, is wounded in the knee at the closing stages of the battle, in later years his nickname became One Leg.
Incident at Waterloo by Robert Hillingford.
Half Price! - £25.00
 Machine Gunners then and now.
The Royal Regiment of Fusiliers by David Rowlands. (GS)
Half Price! - £250.00
GIFP2408GS.  Lancelot defeats Mador by J E Buckley.
Lancelot defeats Mador by J E Buckley. (GS)
Half Price! - £200.00
In 1805 Colonel Congreve invented the rocket which was placed in the hands of the Rocket Brigade of the Royal Artillery and landing parties of the Royal Navy. Rockets were cheap and simple weapons, light enough to be carried in large numbers , and could be fired in large salvoes from portable rests. The employment of the rocket was sporadic and extremely limited. This was due to its unreliability -- rockets had an unpleasant habit of curving in the air and returning to burst at the feet of those using them -- and its inaccuracy compared with gunfire. In the Peninsular War the erratic behaviour of the projectiles fired by a rocket battery made a most unfavourable impression on Lord Wellington. However, the psychological effect on the enemy was quite powerful, and horses could never stand rocket fire.  The 2nd Rocket Troop left England for Germany in August 1813 and played a distinguished part in the Battle of Leipzig, 16th-18th October. It was the only unit of the British Army present, and was attached to the bodyguard of the Prince of Sweden. Rockets had to be fired at close range to achieve any real success. The rocketeers, given a guard of Swedish dragoons, advanced to attack five Saxon battalions of the French army in the village of Paunsdorf. They opened a destructive fire, which was returned by musketry, and a hot combat ensued. Against the perfect targets presented by the enemy manoeuvring in the mass formations of the period the Troop's 28 rocket tubes did excellent service. When the enemy fell into confusion and began to retreat, Captain R. Bogue, the commander of the Rocket Troop, charged at the head of the squadron of cavalry, and over 2000 enemy surrendered. He was killed at the moment of victory.  At Leipzig the 9-pounder rockets were placed on the ground, pointed at the enemy and fired. A small iron trough for this purpose was carried (in a leather cover) on top of the saddle roll of every third man. Swords were attached to the saddles in action, and the troopers had a double-barrelled pistol in a holster on the left hip. The horse furniture included large leather holsters to carry rockets.

The Rocket Brigade at the Battle of Leipzig, 16th-18th October 1813 by David Rowlands (GS)
Half Price! - £250.00

In 1485, the Lancastrian contender for the throne of England, Henry Tudor, sailed from France with a small force of mainly continental mercenaries determined to wrestle the crown from Richard III.  Gathering many supporters along the way he eventually arrived at Bosworth with an army numbering 5000 against Richards 8000.  Things began well enough for Richard but it became apparent during the battle that the neutral Stanley Brothers, Sir William Stanley and Lord Thomas Stanley and their men who had remained on the sidelines, had elected to fight for Henry.  Richard charged for Henry in person but was overwhelmed and killed.  He was the last English King to die in battle.  Although not the final battle of the War of the Roses, the victory for Henry at Bosworth secured the crown and began the Tudor dynasty.

Battle of Bosworth by Brian Palmer (GS)
Half Price! - £250.00
 After coming out of the British Square The 17th Lancers charge by the 58th Regiment. The Battle of Ulundi took place at the Zulu capital of Ulundi on 4th July 1879.  Ulundi became the last battle to be fought during the Zulu war and the British victory finally broke the military power of the Zulu Nation.  The battle began at 6 a.m. when Buller led out an advance guard of mounted troops and South African irregulars.  The British force comprised of five companies of the 80th regiment in square in four ranks, with two Gatling Guns in the centres, two 9-pounders on the left flank and two 7-pounders on the right. The 90th Light Infantry with four companies of the 94th regiment made up the left face with two more 7-pounders.  On the right face were the 1st Battalion of the 13th Light Infantry, four companies of the 58th Regiment, two 7-pounders and two 9-pounders. The rear face was composed of two companies of the 94th Regiment and two companies of the 2nd Battalion of the 21st Regiment.  In the middle of the square were headquarters staff, No. 5 company of the Royal Engineers whhich was led by Lt John Chard who had commanded the troops at Rorkes Drift, the 2nd Native Natal Contingent, fifty wagons and carts with reserve ammunition and hospital wagons. Bullers horsemen protected the front and both flanks of the square. A rearguard of two squadrons of the 17th Lancers and a troop of Natal Native Horse followed.  In total the British force stood at just over 5300 against the Zulu warrior regiments in total over 15000.  The Zulu warriors charged again and again at the square but with the strong British firepower of tifle and gatling gun, they could not get close.  As the Zulu warriors strength weakened, Lord Chelmsford ordered the cavalry to mount, and the 17th Lancers and the 1st Kings Dragoon Guards along with colonial cavalry were ordered to charge the now fleeing Zulus.  The Zulus fled towards the high ground with the cavalry in pursuit.  The Lancers were checked at the Mbilane stream by the fire of a concealed party of Zulus, causing a number casualties before the 17th Lancers overcame the Zulu resistance.  The pursuit continued until not one living Zulu remained on the Mahlabatini plain, with members of the Natal Native Horse, Natal Native Contingent and Woods Irregulars slaughtering the Zulu wounded, done in revenge for the massacre at Isandlwana.

Battle of Ulundi by Brian Palmer.
Half Price! - £70.00
 With Edward I absent from Scotland the land soon slips once more into open insurrection. Though not of noble birth, William Wallace, by brutally slaying the Sheriff of Lanark in vengeance for the murder of Wallaces new bride and her servants, soon comes to embody the Scottish Nationalist cause. Through his popularity and military skill, he is able to rapidly unify the rebellious bands into a single, cohesive fighting force. An English army is sent north to defeat the Scots and capture Wallace and the only noble to come to Wallaces assistance, is his friend Andrew Murray. Other Scottish landowners are too timid and fear the consequences.  The armies meet at Stirling and the English begin to deploy across the narrow wooden bridge which spans the River Forth. Whilst the English commanders bicker about their battle plan, Wallace seizes the moment and blows his horn. Upon this signal, the massed ranks of Scottish spearmen charge forward across the open boggy ground towards the bridge!

William Wallace Before the Battle of Stirling Bridge by Mark Churms. (P)
Half Price! - £3500.00
 On 6th June 1944, D-Day, the Canadian steamship HMCS Prince David  (F89), seen here in the background, released her compliment of landing craft embarking elements of Le Regiment de la Chaudiere, plus some Royal Marines, bound for Mike and Nan beaches.  Their mission was to clear mines and provide cover for the assault craft that were to follow.  By the close of the day, all of her landing craft had been lost to enemy action except one that was accidentally forced onto a semi-submerged obstacle by a friendly tank carrier.

The Drive to Juno by Ivan Berryman. (P)
Half Price! - £700.00
          Home / View All Products                       View Your Basket