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This Week's Half Price Art

1995: Three 105mm Light Guns are coming into action on the roadside.  Towed by an AFV 432, the far gun has arrived first and is almost ready to fire.  The middle gun arrived next, and the nearest gun last.  Red pennants mark the position where each gun is to take up its position.  Due to the hard road surface, they were simply laid on the ground.  The towing vehicle could be either an AFV 432 or a Steyr, seen with the middle gun.  They can be parked near the gun, and the driver could well be in his seat, as shown.  Not all the men of the detachment are needed in order to bring the gun into action.  The 432's engine could be running, and smoke is blowing upward from the exhaust pipe.  It takes some time for the engine to switch off, and needs to run down.  At the far end of the position is the Command Vehicle (CV), a 432 which arrived at the position first.  Arriving last, and coming to park at the far end of the position, is a DROPS vehicle carrying ammunition.  As each gun comes into action the muzzle cover is removed.  The two boxes which contain the sight and the gunner's quadrant are laid on the ground.  The prism is also on the ground, yet to be set up.  The director party is out of sight in this view.  On the gun, the base of the sighting mechanism is visible, but the sight itself is not yet fitted.  The buff-coloured pad is the gun-aimer's forehead protector.  Thick, white arctic socks (with a thin red stripe near the top) were issued, and can be seen on one man.  One individual (a Bombardier) always wore his sleeves rolled up.  Into the hollow end of the handspike the rammer has been inserted.  Its conical end can be seen.  In the background can be seen the ski-slope, built for the 1984 Olympic Winter Games.

105mm Light Guns coming into action at Malopolje, Mount Igman, August 1995. 19th Regiment Royal Artillery. by David Rowlands (GL)
Half Price! - £300.00
After an unsuccessful attempt to invade Britain the previous year, Caesar returned in force. Included among his large ranks was one Indian elephant, a beast unknown to his enemy, and as it transpired a dramatic psychological weapon which succeeded in breaching the Britons defensive position on the River Thames.

Julius Caesar Crossing the Thames, Summer 54BC by David Pentland. (Y)
Half Price! - £40.00
With the full might of Englands Army now gathered to do battle before the besieged Stirling Castle, the young Edward II Plantagenate is confident of victory over the enemy. To the west of the Bannockburn, Robert Bruce, King of Scots kneels to pray with his men and commends his soul to God. The Scottish battle lines are prepared. The Cavalry is in reserve to the rear behind the spearmen and archers (known as Flower of the forest) in tightly packed Schiltrons patiently awaiting the coming onslaught. Unknown to the English, the open marshy ground of no mans land conceals hidden pits and trenches, major obstacles for any mounted charge.  Despite Cliffords and de Beaumonts premature and unsuccessful attempt to relieve the castle the day before, years of victory have taught the brave English knights to regard their Scottish foes with contempt. So, without waiting for the bowmen to effectively weaken the enemy lines the order is hurriedly given to attack! With one rush hundreds of mounted knights led by the impetuous Earl of Gloucester thunder headlong through the boggy ground straight for the impenetrable forest of spears and into defeat and death.  With dash and courage the knights try to force a way through the mass of spears but the Scots stand firm. The momentum of the charge is lost and there is no room to manoeuvre. Everywhere horses and men crash to the ground, casualties amongst the English are horrific. Robert Bruce seizes the moment and orders the exultant army to advance. The Englishmen are slowly pushed back into the waters of the Bannockburn. All discipline is lost as the soldiers and horses madly scramble for the far bank of the burn. Many drown or perish in the crush to escape the deadly melee. Edward II, with his army destroyed, flees with his bodyguard for the safety of Stirling Castle but is refused refuge and has to fight his way south to England. For Robert Bruce and Scotland victory is complete.
Text by Paul Scarron-Jones.

Battle of Bannockburn by Mark Churms. (P)
Half Price! - £13000.00
 Two days into Operation Desert Storm (G+2), and the allied VII Corps had wheeled through southern Iraq towards the Kuwait border. In the centre of the advance were the men and tanks of the US 3rd Armored Division and 2nd Cavalry Regiment supported by the 1st Infantry Division. The greatest glory though, went to the 2nd Cavalry Regiment, who after an initial encounter with 10 Iraqi T72 tanks all of which were destroyed near longitudinal line 60 (Easting 60), moved on until the bulk of the battle occurred at 73 Easting. Despite having to fight in almost zero visibility due to dust storms and nightfall, the regiments M2A2, M3A2 Bradleys, and M1A1 Abrams decimated the opposing elements of the Iraqi crack Tawakalna Republican Guard Division and 12th Armoured Division. Their success was followed up by the 1st Infantry Division who carried on the attack to take Objective Norfolk the following morning, and by the 3rd Armored Division to the north who engaged and destroyed other brigades of the Tawakalna and 12 Armoured Divisions.

The Battle of 73 Easting, Iraq, 26th February 1991 by David Pentland. (GL)
Half Price! - £300.00

Last stand of General Custer at the Battle of Little Big Horn. General George Armstrong Custer and the 7th cavalrys last stand at the battle of Little Big Horn.

Battle of the Little Big Horn by Brian Palmer (General Custer) (P)
Half Price! - £1700.00
 In this, the first true parachute operation of World war two, German paratroops of 1st battalion Fallschirmjager Regiment 1, proved themselves an invaluable component of Blitzkrieg. First in the initial stages of the campaign by seizing airfields and bridges in Norway and Denmark, and subsequently by supporting army ground forces engaged at Narvik.

The Battle for Norway by David Pentland. (GS)
Half Price! - £250.00
  Colonial cavalry regiments gallop past their commanding officer and dignitaries in this Victorian Colonial scene.
Review at Shanghai by John Charlton (GL)
Half Price! - £300.00
The Allied breakthrough into the Normandy plain, against heavy German opposition. Filed marshall Montgomery claimed that Operation Goodwood had two major aims - the first being to break out from the beaches and the other to destroy the German armoured reserves and draw them away from the US forces that were preparing for Operation Cobra in the western sector.  The plan for the breakout began with a massive aerial bombardment, using the strategic air forces large bombers to decimate the German defending forces then Lt-General Richard OConnors VIII Corps comprising three whole armoured divisions - 11th, 7th and Guards - and spearheaded by Major-General Pip Roberts 11th would then rush forward, overwhelm the defending Germans and causing the armoured forces to move forward and break out from the beach areas. To cover the flanks the Canadians would fight their way to Caen, while the British 3rd Infantry and 51st Highland Divisions would cover the left flank,  and move further eastward.

Operation Goodwood, Caen, Normandy, 18th-19th July, 1944 by David Rowlands (GS)
Half Price! - £200.00
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