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This Week's Half Price Art

English soldiers search a blacksmiths hunting for highlanders who fled from after the battle of Culloden.
After Culloden, Rebel Hunting by J.S. Lucas.
Half Price! - £45.00
Wearing patched white trousers and gaiters made of mattress ticking. In the mid distance, officers of the Polish Lancers and the Guard. Napoleon stands on the distant cliff. To the right a ship flies a tricolour. The Elba battalion was Napoleons bodyguard in exile, comprising six companies of Guardsmen, 100 artillery men and a crew of 21 seamen, They formed the nucleus of the Imperial Guard in 1815.

A Grenadier of the Guard at Elba by Horace Vernet.
Half Price! - £33.00
 Central Russia, 4th-12th July 1943. For Operation Citadel the Heavy tank battalion 503 was split into separate companies and attached to various panzer divisions. Rubbels 1st company went to 6th Panzer Division, and as such take part in the epic breakthrough on the 10th and 11th which came close to the collapse of the soviet southern front!

Alfred Rubbel at Kursk by David Pentland. (P)
Half Price! - £1700.00
GDHM3012GS.  Battle Camp, Infantry Training, Catterick by David Rowlands.
Battle Camp, Infantry Training, Catterick by David Rowlands. (GS)
Half Price! - £250.00

The leading air support squadron of 39th Engineer Regiment preparing for war.

Air Support Sappers by David Rowlands (GS)
Half Price! - £250.00
On the night of 6th April 1812 Wellingtons Army, surrounding the walled Spanish town of Badajoz (garrisoned by Napoleons soldiers under general Baron Philippon) is ready to attack!  The men of the 45th regiment from Pictons 3rd Division launch themselves in a desperate and bloody assault against the north castle wall. Carrying improvised ladders, the men have their top buttons undone, overalls rolled up and are stripped for action.  The castles defenders (Germans, allied to Napoleon of the Graf und Erbprinz Regiment from Hesse-Darmstadt) partroling the walls in their greatcoats are intially surprised by the bold assault from this sector but they have been preparing the strong defenses for some time. Soon the night air is full of musketry, falling masonry, burning bundles of ropes and exploding grenades or mines.  Despite the horrific casualties suffered the attackers press home. As the first scaling ladders are raised near a small bell tower the young Lt. James Macpherson reaches for the top of the wall. The ladders are too short! Undaunted he cries to his men below to lift the base of the ladder closer to the wall. This rapid, vertical movement suddenly propels him to a height several feet above the Germans heads. A shot rings out as one of the defenders fires point blank into the young mans chest. Fortunately the lead ball only strikes a glancing blow, cleaving in two a button of the officers waist coat and dislocating one of his ribs. Despite his fortunate escape, the force of the impact nearly sends him tumbling from the ladder. Somehow he maintains his grasp but the ladder itself gives way under the weight of the men following. Some unfortunates are impaled on the bayonets of their comrades below.  Leaping from the rungs of another ladder, Corporal Kelly is the first man over the top and gradually the 45th gain a foothold on the ramparts. The rest of the regiment is ordered to unfix bayonets. Using the few remaining ladders, others also manage to scale the walls. Through the carnage they climb, club and shoot their way into the castle itself!  Maepherson now regains consciousness at the foot of the wall and revived with a cup of coco from his friend A.A. General Hercules Packenham, who was directly behind him on the ladder when it broke. Though winded by the shot he rises to his feet. This sudden movement relocates his rib and he is able to climb the ladders once more. Once over the defense he sees the old towers of Apendez and Albar-rana to his left and the cathedral illuminated by gun fire in the distance. However his objective is directly ahead. Atop the abandoned tower of Santa Maria before him still flies the French tricolour.  Macplierson seizes the opportunity, mounts the spiral stairway to the top turret and pulls down the enemy flag. For want of a substitute he flies his own red jacket from the pole, signifying that the castle has fallen. In the rest of the town the fighting continues and turns into a blood lust. Badajoz is one of the bloodiest and violent sieges of the Peninsula War. On the following day Maepherson presents his trophy to the Duke of Wellington himself but his bravery is not rewarded with a promotion.
Storming of Badajoz by the Sherwood Foresters painting by Mark Churms. (P)
Half Price! - £300.00
Bhurtpore, about a hundred miles South of Delhi, was a fortified city perched on a great mound. The walls of the fortress were built of mud, of immense thickness, and the round shot fired by artillery in those days simply buried themselves deeply in their sides. Following the murder of the rightful successor to the ruler of Bhurtpore, lawlessness and oppression prevailed in the region. The Governor General ordered the Bengal Army to restore order there.  One cavalry and two infantry divisions, with a powerful siege train of the Bengal Army marched towards the city. Then began the slow, methodical work of digging the parallels, emplacing the guns behind defensive parapets and bringing up and defending the massive quantity of ammunition that was required. In the rocky soil around Bhurtpore every European and Native soldier was employed in the hard work of digging these positions. The guns steadily pushed forward as new parallels were dug, until the breaching batteries were established no more than 250 yards from the fortress. On 18th January 1826 the final assault was made, and Bhurtpore was captured.  Gabions filled with earth protect the guns from enemy fire. Above these are laid fascines and sandbags. Bhurtpore's crumbling walls of dry mud, which the artillery has been bombarding night and day, can be glimpsed above the gun position. I have depicted an iron 24-pounder gun on its wooden platform. The piece of the gun would have been horizontal at this range. The NCO in charge of the gun is sighting it by looking along the piece. Two men with hand-spikes manhandle the bracket trail according to his instructions. This would have to be done each time the gun was fired. The solid round shot has been loaded and rammed home on its wooden sabot. After correctly laying the gun, the NCO will retire to the left rear and order the man holding the portfire to ignite the charge. A native lascar or Golundauze is replenishing the water bucket for the spongeman. In the background a bugler of the Bengal Artillery can be glimpsed in his red jacket. At far right is a soldier of HM's 59th Foot, which served in the trenches and took part in the assault.  In 1861 the Bengal Artillery was absorbed into the Royal Artillery.
3rd Company, 4th Battalion Bengal Artillery at the Siege of Bhurtpore, 1825-26. Now 57 (Bhurtpore) Locating Battery Royal Artillery. (GS)
Half Price! - £200.00
 Private Wassall, whilst escaping the debacle of Isandhlwana, was being pursued by Zulu warriors as he made his way down the Buffalo River, the border between Zululand and Natal. Wassall rode his Basuto pony into the river, but upon hearing a cry for help and seeing a man from his own regiment drowning, he turned and made his way back to the Zulu side of the river, Quickly dismounting he tied his horse to a tress, swam into the river and rescued a private called Westwood as the Zulus were sweeping along the riverbank just at the moment the Zulus rushed forward. For his act of valour in the face of the enemy Private Samuel Wassall was awarded the first of the Zulu War Victoria Crosses.

Private Samuel Wassall of the 80th Regiment of Foot (Staffordshire Volunteers) at Fugitives Drift by Jason Askew. (GS)
Half Price! - £250.00
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