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This Week's Half Price Art

 St. Charmond Assault tanks of the French 10th Heavy Tank battalion move through Villers-Cotterets forest in preparation for the 10th Army counterattack on the German Soissons-Rheims salient.

A Saint goes to War - The Second Marne Offensive, France 18th July 1918 by David Pentland. (P)
Half Price! - £1600.00
 The Battle at Rorke's Drift, also known as the Defence of Rorke's Drift, was an action in the Anglo-Zulu War.  The defence of the mission station of Rorke's Drift, under the command of Lieutenant John Chard of the Royal Engineers, immediately followed the British Army's defeat at the Battle of Isandlwana on 22nd January 1879, and continued into the following day, 23rd January.  150 British and colonial troops successfully defended the garrison against an intense assault by approximately 2000 Zulu warriors.  The intense and noisy Zulu attacks on Rorke's Drift came very close to defeating the tiny garrison, but were ultimately repelled by blasts of Martini-Henry rifle fire-and some smart bayonet work-with  some guts behind the bayonet thrusts!  Eleven Victoria Crosses were awarded to the defenders, along with a number of other decorations and honours.  Of particular note in the painting is the dog 'Pip' - he survived Isandlwhana by retreating along the fugitive's trail to Rorke's Drift.  During the Zulu attacks on Rorke's drift, Pip did his part in the defence - by jumping on the mealie bag parapets and barking at Zulus- who were hiding in the long grass and sneaking up to the defences, then biting any Zulu who came within range.  Unfortunately Pip was not officially recognised for his part in the action.  He was not awarded a VC, on the basis that he was a volunteer canine that accompanied an officer, rather than a War Office issued canine.  Conversely, if Pip had been killed, then he would not have been officially listed as a casualty, as he accompanied the army in a strictly private capacity.  British army horses were in a different category as they were War Office issue, therefore the loss of a horse in action, or to disease, carried a financial liability for the War Office.

The Defence of Rorke's Drift by Jason Askew. (GM)
Half Price! - £300.00


Capemounted Rifles against Shakas Zulu Impis c.1827 by Chris Collingwood. (P)
Half Price! - £7000.00
The Duke of Wellington overlooks the Dragoons and Artillery moving forward at the Battle of Vittoria during the Peninsula War, surrounded by his staff officers.

The Battle of Vittoria by Thomas Jones Barker (GS)
Half Price! - £200.00

 Musa Qala, Afghanistan, August 2006.  The defenders of the Musa Qala District centre compound comprised of an ad hoc company, made up from elements of Royal Irish, Danish, and 3 PARA, designated E company.  For some 40 days they repelled over 100 attacks.  One of the longest serving and most effective units in the base was the Royal Irish 81mm mortar section.

Easy Company by David Pentland.
Half Price! - £70.00
Themistocles had chosen the narrow waters at the entrance to the bay well. The Persians could not bring their larger fleet to bear on the smaller Greek fleet and due to the design and manoeuverability of the Greek Triremes, the Greek fleet sailed down the right channel next to Salamis and turned to ram the Persian fleet as it entered the bay. The Persian captains tried frantically to turn their ships but their oars became entangled and the turning manoeuvre caused the ships to run into each other. The Greek Triremes were able to ram the leading Persian ships, disengage and ram again. This was a great victory for Themistocles who lost only 70 ships from his fleet of 380 Triremes, compared to the loss of over 600 ships from the Persian fleet of over 1,000.

Battle of Salamis, 23rd September 480BC by Wilhelm von Kaulbach (GS)
Half Price! - £200.00
16 July 1760: This regiment of light cavalry, mounted on light, active horses, was raised in 1759 in the London area. It went to join the British Army in Germany in 1760, and a few weeks later in its first action it won high distinction and suffered very heavy loss.  With Hanoverian and Hessian troops, the newly arrived British light cavalry attacked a French force of five battalions and a regiment of hussars near the village of Emsdorf, in Hesse. In hot weather, and struggling to manhandle their artillery, the French infantry withdrew through woods towards Langenstein, where they rallied. Emerging from the trees into an open plain they were immediately charged by the 15th Light Dragoons. Three times the regiment charged the enemy, who outnumbered them five to one. A complete battalion was captured, along with six guns and numerous colours.  The light dragoons wore distinctive caps, light jockey boots and were armed with carbine, bayonet, pistol and sword. The drummers wore heavily laced green coats with hanging sleeves, and their drums bore the arms of the their Colonel. The enemy consisted of five battalions of two German regiments in the French army, the Infantry-Regiment Royal Baviere and the Infantry-Regiment Anhalt. German troops wore blue coats, with different facing colours, (in this case, black and straw colour respectively).

The Charge of the 15th Light Dragoons at Emsdorf by David Rowlands (GL)
Half Price! - £300.00
 Sous-Lieutenant Ferdinand de la Riloisiere of 1st Regiment of Carabiniers, moments before he received a mortal wound, in the charge of the 2nd reserve cavalry Corps, against the reavski Redoubt. Despite his injury he survived for several days after the battle and was presented with the cross of the Legion of Honour only hours before his death.

La Moscowa, The Battle of Borodino, 7th September 1812 by Mark Churms. (Y)
Half Price! - £40.00
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