Customer Helpline
(UK) : 01436 820269

Shipping Rates
Valuation of Your Collection

You currently have no items in your basket

Join us on Facebook!


Buy with confidence and security!
Publishing historical art since 1985

Follow us on Twitter!

AMAZING VALUE SPECIAL OFFERS !

VIEW ALL OF OUR CURRENT SPECIAL OFFERS HERE!
 
Product Search        
Massive savings on this month's big offers including our BUY ONE GET ONE HALF PRICE offer on many prints and many others at HALF PRICE or with FREE PRINTS!
Many of our offers end in 21 hours, 51 minutes!
View our Special Offers




Item Code : - This Edition
TYPEEDITION DETAILSSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSYOUR PRICEPURCHASING
noneSOLD
OUT
NOT
AVAILABLE
All prices on our website are displayed in British Pounds Sterling


This Week's Half Price Art

 In 1306 Robert the Bruce was crowned King of the Scots. In 1309 Bruce controlled most of Scotland north of the Firth and Clyde. Over the next few years Bruce conquered the English Garrisons of Perth, Dundee, Roxburgh, Dumfries and St. Andrews, leaving only Stirling in English hands. On 24th June 1314 Robert the Bruce defeated the English army at Bannockburn. The war dragged on until the peace treaty was signed in 1328, recognising Robert the Bruce as King Robert I of Scotland, and Scotland an independent Kingdom. He died the following year.

Robert the Bruce by Chris Collingwood. (GS)
Half Price! - £300.00
 Confederate skirmishers of the 19th Virginia Volunteers take over behind a farmhouse during the early stages of the war 1861.

Grey Cover for Grey Rifles by Chris Collingwood (GL)
Half Price! - £300.00
By about 6pm the Zulu attacks had extended all around the front of the post, and fighting raged at hand-to-hand along the mealie-bag wall.  Lieutenant Chard himself took up a position on the barricade, firing over the mealie-bags with a Martini-Henry, whilst Lieutenant Bromhead directed any spare men to plug the gaps in the line.  The men in the yard and on the front wall were dangerously exposed to the fire of Zulu marksmen posted in the rocky terraces on Shiyane (Oskarsberg) hill behind the post. Several men were hit, including Acting Assistant Commissary Dalton, and Corporal Allen of the 14th.  Surgeon Reynolds treated the wounded as best he could despite the fire.  Once the veranda at the front of the hospital had been abandoned, the Zulus had mounted a determined attack on the building itself, setting fire to the thatched roof with spears tied with burning grass. The defenders were forced to evacuate the patients room by room, eventually passing them out through a small window into the open yard. Shortly after 6pm Chard decided that the Zulu pressure was too great, and ordered a withdrawal to a barricade of biscuit boxes which had been hastily erected across the yard, from the corner of the store-house to the front mealie-bag wall. In this small compound the garrison would fight for their lives throughout most of the coming night.
Rorkes Drift 22nd January 1879 - Defending the Store House by Jason Askew. (B)
Half Price! - £33.00
 The Battle of Isandlwana on 22 January 1879 was the first major encounter in the Anglo-Zulu War between the British Empire and the Zulu Kingdom. Eleven days after the British commenced their invasion of Zululand in South Africa, a Zulu force of some 10,000-12,000 warriors attacked a portion of the British main column consisting of about 1,800 British, colonial and native troops and perhaps 400 civilians. The Zulus were equipped mainly with the traditional Assegai iron spears and cow-hide shields, but also had a number of muskets and old rifles though they were not formally trained in their use. The British and colonial troops were armed with the state-of-the-art Martini-Henry breech-loading rifle and two 7 pounder artillery pieces as well as a rocket battery. Despite a vast disadvantage in weapons technology, the numerically superior Zulus ultimately overwhelmed the poorly led and badly deployed British, killing over 1,300 troops, including all those out on the forward firing line. The Zulu army suffered around 350 killed, and up to several hundred wounded. The battle was a crushing victory for the Zulus and caused the abandonment of the first British invasion of Zululand.

The Battle of Isandlwana by Jason Askew. (P)
Half Price! - £3450.00

The French General Kellerman (Duc de Valmy) resisted the invading armies under the Duke of Brunswick at Valmy, between Reims and Verdun, on 20th September, 1792, a turning-point in the French revolutionary wars.
Battle of Valmy by Horace Vernet (GL)
Half Price! - £300.00
Depicting the Light Brigade at the moment of reaching the Russian guns. Shown are the 11th Hussars and the 17th Lancers.  The all time classic image of the disastrous  Charge of the Light Brigade which included the 17th lancers, who lead the charge.  Lord Cardigan is shown on the left, dressed in his 11th Hussars uniform.   The Light Brigade were being kept in reserve, after the successful charge of the heavy brigade, but the slow advance of the British Infantry to take advantage of the heavy brigades success had given the Russian forces time to take away Artillery pieces from captured redoubts.  Raglan, after seeing this ordered the light brigade to advance rapidly to the front, follow the enemy and try to prevent the enemy carrying away the guns. This message taken by Captain Nolan, to Lord Lucan, the cavalry Commander.  One of the Officers of Raglans Staff, urged Lucan, who could only see the main Russian Artillery position at the head of a valley.  Lord Lucan rode over to Cardigan and ordered him to attack these guns.  So the Light Brigade charged these Russian guns, and not the guns being taken away by Russian forces from the redoubts. The carnage was great, from the 673 men who started the charge, 113 men were killed and many others wounded. The Light Brigade was made up of the 4th and 13th Light Dragoons, 8th and 11th Hussars and the 17th Lancers. A spectating French Officer General Pierre Bosquet proclaimed - It is magnificent but it is not war.

Relief of the Light Brigade by Richard Caton Woodville (GS)
Half Price! - £200.00
DHM195GS.  General Gordons Last Stand, Khartoum 26th January 1885 by G.W. Joy.

General Gordons Last Stand, Khartoum 26th January 1885 by George William Joy (GS)
Half Price! - £200.00
 North Africa, 30th September - 6th November 1942.  During the final battle at El Alamein the Italian paratroopers of the 185th <i>Folgore</i> Parachute Division held the southern end of the Axis defence line down to the Qattara Depression.  For several days they repelled constant attacks by a succession of Commonwealth units including the vaunted 7th Armoured Division, <i>The Desert Rats</i>.  All of this ended on November 6th, when the last organized group commanded by Colonel Camosso and Major Zanninovich, surrounded by British tanks, finished its ammunition reserves.  From an initial strength of 5,000, only 306 paratroopers were still alive.  For their bravery, the British gave them the singular honour of allowing the Folgore survivors to retain their weapons on their surrender.

Folgore at El Alamein by David Pentland. (GL)
Half Price! - £300.00
          Home / View All Products                       View Your Basket