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The Fall, The Forest Stakes by Henry Alken. (GS)


The Fall, The Forest Stakes by Henry Alken. (GS)

Item Code : GITW1474GSThe Fall, The Forest Stakes by Henry Alken. (GS) - This Edition
TYPEEDITION DETAILSSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSYOUR PRICEPURCHASING
GICLEE
CANVAS
Limited edition of 200 giclee canvas prints. Image size 30 inches x 20 inches (76cm x 51cm)noneHalf
Price!
Now : £200.00

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This Week's Half Price Art

 Sturmtigers of Sturmmorser Company 1002, commanded by Lieutenant Zippel, take on ammunition in preparation for the battle to come. These fearsome monsters 38cm rocket projectors could penetrate up to 2.5m of reinforced concrete. Luckily for the Allies only 18 were completed by the wars end.

Preparing for the Day, the Reichswald, February 1945 by David Pentland. (GL)
Half Price! - £300.00
Battle of Crecy  26th August 1346. On 12th July Edward III landed in Normandy with his army and marching north plundered the countryside. King Philip VI assembled an army to stop Edward and tracked them across the Somme River. When Edward reached Crecy he stopped and ordered his army to take up defensive positions. King Philip surveyed the English positions and decided to postpone his attack until August 27th. However, the French vanguard pressed forward too far and so committed the entire army to the battle. The hired Genoese crossbowmen began the assault but came under severe attack from the English longbows and so fled to the rear. King Philip then ordered his cavalry to charge resulting in a huge loss of horse and man under the barrage of arrows which rained down on them. By the end of the night after several unsuccessful assaults the French army was reduced by a third and King John of Luxemburg was dead. Edward then turned towards Calais.

Battle of Crecy by Brian Palmer.
Half Price! - £70.00
There is no retreat from here, men! said General Sir Colin Campbell (who at that moment may have said to have commanded the regiment in person) as he cantered along the front of the 93rd You must die where you stand To which some of the Highlanders replied cheerily Ay Ay, Sir Colin if needs be well do that. Nearer and nearer the Russian Squadrons approached - the ground trembling beneath their horses feet, and gathering speed at every stride, they galloped on towards that thin red streak, topped with steel   the Sutherland Highlanders awaited the onslaught of the enemys horsemen in line, without a movement in their ranks. I  would not even form four deep! was the reply of Sir Colin, when remonstrated with for giving the Russians such a chance. Cool as if on Birthday parade The Sutherlands stood until their foes were within 600 yards, then down on their knees they dropped the front rank, and delivered a steady volley. But the distance was too great, and, though a few saddles were emptied, the Russians pressed forward unchecked. On they rode, till scarcely 200 yards separated them from the intrepid Highlanders.  When the rear rank brought their Minies to the present and over the heads of their kneeling comrades pourd a withering fire into the enemys masses.Shaken to their very centre, the Russian Squadrons fell back, but, encouraged by their gallant leaders, they determined to make one last bid for victory, and wheeling around, endeavored to turn the Highlanders right flank. here they were checkmated by the grenadier Company, which received the charge with such a volley, that the Russians went Files about and scampered off to seek the shelter of their guns.

The Thin Red Line by Robert Gibb.
Half Price! - £37.00
 Edward departs from his almost completed Rhuddlan Castle at the conclusion of his second Welsh campaign.

Edward the 1st in Wales by David Pentland. (GS)
Half Price! - £250.00

A lone French soldier is herded into captivity after being captured during the Franco Prussian war.
Captive Difficile by Alphonse de Neuville (GS)
Half Price! - £200.00
 Marshal Ney charging at the head of the French cavalry against the British Squares. Of all Napoleons Generals at Waterloo none distinguished himself more than Marshal Ney, Prince of the Moskowa, the splendid warrior upon whom his Imperial master had conferred the proud title of Le Brave des Braves (The Bravest of the Brave) Twice he led the attack on the British centre, first at the head of the cavalry and then with the Old Guard, and he only retired from the field at nightfall, after five horses had been killed under him.

Marshal Ney at the Battle of Waterloo by Mark Churms. (P)
Half Price! - £4500.00
Napoleon questioning a captured Prussian Soldier, and at this point not believing that the Prussians were so close.
The Decisive Moment at Waterloo by Robert Hillingford (GL)
Half Price! - £250.00
 Queen's Royal Hussars meeting the locals on patrol in Helmand.

Queen's Royal Hussars, Afghanistan by Graeme Lothian. (GS)
Half Price! - £250.00
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