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Epsom Trophy by Mark Churms.


Epsom Trophy by Mark Churms.

Epsom Trophy, Polo Championship
Item Code : SSP0002Epsom Trophy by Mark Churms. - This EditionAdd any two items on this offer to your basket, and the lower priced item will be half price in the checkout! Buy 1 Get 1 Half Price!
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PRINT Signed limited edition of 1000 prints.

Image size 11 inches x 8 inches (28cm x 20cm)Artist : Mark ChurmsHalf
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Other editions of this item : Epsom Trophy by Mark Churms. SSP0002
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Artist Proof Edition. Image size 11 inches x 8 inches (28cm x 20cm)Artist : Mark ChurmsHalf Price!Add any two items on this offer to your basket, and the lower priced item will be half price in the checkout!Now : £30.00VIEW EDITION...
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Artist Details : Mark Churms
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Mark Churms

Mark was born in Wales in 1967. He gained his degree in Architectural Studies at Oxford Polytechnic in 1989, but soon his interest in drawing buildings was surpassed by his love of painting horses and in 1991 he began work as a freelance artist. His first commissions were for sporting subjects, Polo, Racing and Hunting. However his consuming passion for military history, particularly of the Napoleonic era, quickly became his dominant theme, with the invaluable counsel of French military experts (accuracy in uniform and terrain of the various battles takes a great deal of time and consultation with many experts across Europe). Mark Churms joined Cranston Fine Arts in 1991 and for a period of 8 years, was commissioned for several series and special commissions. His series of the Zulu War, and of the Battle of Waterloo were the highlights during this period. Mark Churms' deep understanding and detailed knowledge of the period made Mark at that time one of the most prolific and successfull artists for Cranston Fine Arts. Cranston Fine Arts are proud with their series of superb art prints and original paintings painted by Mark Churms in this period. We now offer Mark Churms art prints in special 2 and 4 print packs with great discounts as well as a number of selected original paintings at upto half price.

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This Week's Half Price Art

Richard the Lionhearts tactical skills and military training played a substantial role in the capture of Acre in 1191 by the Crusaders. But Richard the Lionheart was ruthless and after the capture of the city he marched 2,700 Muslim soldiers onto the road of Nazareth and in front of the Muslim army positions, had them executed one by one.  But Richard the Lionheart was up against a great leader in Saladin and the crusades did not always go his way.  After he negotiated the Treaty of Jaffa with Saladin and secured the granting of special rights of travel around Palestine and in Jerusalem for Christian pilgrims, Richard the Lionheart started his journey back to England in 1192.  He was shipwrecked, and captured by the German Emperor Henry VI, only being released after a 150,000 mark ransom was paid.  This money was raised by taxes in England.

Richard I (The Lion Heart) During the 3rd Crusade by Chris Collingwood (P)
Half Price! - £7000.00
DHM939GL.  The Charge of the French Cuirassiers at Reichshof by Adolphe Yvon.
The Charge of the French Cuirassiers at Reichshof by Adolphe Yvon (GL)
Half Price! - £300.00
Battle of Waterloo 1815

Royal Horse Guards by Brian Palmer (P)
Half Price! - £600.00
 With the full might of Englands Army now gathered to do battle before the besieged Stirling Castle, the young Edward II Plantagenate is confident of victory over the enemy. To the west of the Bannockburn, Robert Bruce, King of Scots kneels to pray with his men and commends his soul to God. The Scottish battle lines are prepared. The Cavalry is in reserve to the rear behind the spearmen and archers (known as Flower of the forest) in tightly packed Schiltrons patiently awaiting the coming onslaught. Unknown to the English, the open marshy ground of no mans land conceals hidden pits and trenches, major obstacles for any mounted charge.  Despite Cliffords and de Beaumonts premature and unsuccessful attempt to relieve the castle the day before, years of victory have taught the brave English knights to regard their Scottish foes with contempt. So, without waiting for the bowmen to effectively weaken the enemy lines the order is hurriedly given to attack! With one rush hundreds of mounted knights led by the impetuous Earl of Gloucester thunder headlong through the boggy ground straight for the impenetrable forest of spears and into defeat and death.  With dash and courage the knights try to force a way through the mass of spears but the Scots stand firm. The momentum of the charge is lost and there is no room to manoeuvre. Everywhere horses and men crash to the ground, casualties amongst the English are horrific. Robert Bruce seizes the moment and orders the exultant army to advance. The Englishmen are slowly pushed back into the waters of the Bannockburn. All discipline is lost as the soldiers and horses madly scramble for the far bank of the burn. Many drown or perish in the crush to escape the deadly melee. Edward II, with his army destroyed, flees with his bodyguard for the safety of Stirling Castle but is refused refuge and has to fight his way south to England. For Robert Bruce and Scotland victory is complete.
Text by Paul Scarron-Jones.

The Battle of Bannockburn by Mark Churms.
Half Price! - £70.00

In 1895, Leander Starr Jameson assembled a private army outside the Transvaal with the aim of invading and overthrowing the Boer government.  The idea had been to encourage civil unrest among foreign workers (Uitlanders), and use the outbreak of open revolt as an excuse to invade and take over the territory.  But Jameson grew impatient and so launched the Jameson Raid on 29th December 1895, and managed to push within twenty miles of Johannesburg before superior Boer forces compelled him and his men to surrender at Doornkop on the 2nd of Janaury 1896.
Jameson's Last Stand, Battle of Doornkop 2nd January 1896 by Richard Caton Woodville
Half Price! - £20.00
DHM938.  Apsaroke Crow by Alan Herriot.

Apsaroke Crow by Alan Herriot.
Half Price! - £30.00
After the capture of the Magazine on 16th September 1857, at the Siege of Delhi, the mutineers staged a counter-attack. Several times they set light to the thatched roof adjacent to the perimeter wall. The actual Magazine was a building in the centre of the compound, but it had been blown up by the British earlier in the siege, leaving the perimeter wall intact. At that time there were buildings between the Magazine and the Red Fort. Lieutenant Renny of the Bengal Horse Artillery mounted the wall and flung 5.5 inch shells, with their fuses lit, into the midst of the enemy, although he was under heavy fire from the walls of the Palace (the Red Fort) and Selinghur (an outlying fortification). For this action he was later awarded the Victoria Cross.  I have depicted men of Renny's 5th (Native) Troop, 1st Brigade, Bengal Horse Artillery lighting shells with a portfire. Soldiers of the Belooch Regiment (in green uniforms) are handing these up to Renny. Other soldiers of HM's 61st Regiment, which had captured the Magazine that morning, are seen lining the wall and attempting to put out the fire in the compound. Some are in khaki and some in shirt sleeves.  In the hot weather at the Siege of Delhi, most British troops wore their white summer uniforms, often dyed locally to produce varying shades of khaki, sometimes described as a slate-grey blue colour. I have depicted Renny, who was 31 years old, with his pouch belt worn over his left shoulder, and his Undress sword belt (as described in the Standing Orders for the Bengal Horse Artillery). He and his men wore their forage caps with a cover and a neck curtain for protection from the sun.
Lt A Renny VC, Bengal Horse Artillery at the Delhi Magazine 1857 by David Rowlands (GS)
Half Price! - £250.00
 The Battle at Rorke's Drift, also known as the Defence of Rorke's Drift, was an action in the Anglo-Zulu War.  The defence of the mission station of Rorke's Drift, under the command of Lieutenant John Chard of the Royal Engineers, immediately followed the British Army's defeat at the Battle of Isandlwana on 22nd January 1879, and continued into the following day, 23rd January.  150 British and colonial troops successfully defended the garrison against an intense assault by approximately 2000 Zulu warriors.  The intense and noisy Zulu attacks on Rorke's Drift came very close to defeating the tiny garrison, but were ultimately repelled by blasts of Martini-Henry rifle fire-and some smart bayonet work-with  some guts behind the bayonet thrusts!  Eleven Victoria Crosses were awarded to the defenders, along with a number of other decorations and honours.  Of particular note in the painting is the dog 'Pip' - he survived Isandlwhana by retreating along the fugitive's trail to Rorke's Drift.  During the Zulu attacks on Rorke's drift, Pip did his part in the defence - by jumping on the mealie bag parapets and barking at Zulus- who were hiding in the long grass and sneaking up to the defences, then biting any Zulu who came within range.  Unfortunately Pip was not officially recognised for his part in the action.  He was not awarded a VC, on the basis that he was a volunteer canine that accompanied an officer, rather than a War Office issued canine.  Conversely, if Pip had been killed, then he would not have been officially listed as a casualty, as he accompanied the army in a strictly private capacity.  British army horses were in a different category as they were War Office issue, therefore the loss of a horse in action, or to disease, carried a financial liability for the War Office.

The Defence of Rorke's Drift by Jason Askew. (GM)
Half Price! - £300.00
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