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This Week's Half Price Art

DHM1058GL.  Light Gun of the 19th Regiment Royal Artillery in action, Mount Igman, Bosnia, 30th August 1995 by David Rowlands.

Light Gun of the 19th Regiment Royal Artillery in action, Mount Igman, Bosnia, 30th August 1995 by David Rowlands (GL)
Half Price! - £300.00
During the Seven Years War (1756 - 63) a large French army of 52,000 men commanded by Marshal Contades moved from the Rhine to take Minden and threaten the Electorate of Hanover, one of Britains allies in the war.  Ferdinand of Brunswick commanding an allied army consisting of British, Brunswick, Hanoverians and Hessen - Cassell troops numbering 42,000 stood in their way.  The battle began at first light with the allies forming up in 8 columns preparing to advance.  Due to a misunderstanding of orders two brigades, which included the 12th, went into the attack before the rest of the line had properly formed.  With drums beating and colors flying they launched a frontal attack on French cavalry, and against all odds held firm and threw them back in confusion.  By this time the rest of the infantry had arrived in support and the French army was routed.  Minden is remarkable for this unique attack by infantry in line against a mass of cavalry.

The 12th (Suffolk Regiment) at the Battle of Minden. 1st August 1759 by Brian Palmer (GS)
Half Price! - £250.00
DHM1330GL.  The Liberation of Basra by the 7th Armoured Brigade, 6th April 2003 by David Rowlands.
The Liberation of Basra by the 7th Armoured Brigade, 6th April 2003 by David Rowlands (GL)
Half Price! - £280.00
 Jackals on patrol with the Queen's Royal Hussars.  Jackals parked up at the Qala-I-Bost citadel while the QRH attend the shura by the front gate.

Jackals of the Queen's Royal Hussars by Graeme Lothian. (GS)
Half Price! - £250.00

 Soldier of the 24th Regiment of Foot (South Wales Borderers) loads his last round at the Battle of Isandhlwana.

Last of the 24th by Bud Bradshaw. (Y)
Half Price! - £100.00
 Near Caen, D-Day, 6th June 1944.  Vickers heavy machinegun team of the British 3rd Division, <i>Monty's Ironsides</i>, in action against the German strong points Morris and Hillman.  The division comprised of the 2nd East Yorkshires, 1st South Lancashires, 1st Suffolks, 2nd Lincolnshires, 1st King's Own Scottish Borderers, 2nd Royal Ulster Rifles, 2nd Warwickshires, 1st Norfolks, and 2nd King's Shropshire Light Infantry.

Morris and Hillman by David Pentland.
Half Price! - £55.00
GIDT7716GL.  Bonaparte and the Survivors of the Forlorn Hope at St Jean by Richard Caton Woodville.
Bonaparte and the Survivors of the Forlorn Hope at St Jean by Richard Caton Woodville (GL)
Half Price! - £300.00
 The Battle at Rorke's Drift, also known as the Defence of Rorke's Drift, was an action in the Anglo-Zulu War.  The defence of the mission station of Rorke's Drift, under the command of Lieutenant John Chard of the Royal Engineers, immediately followed the British Army's defeat at the Battle of Isandlwana on 22nd January 1879, and continued into the following day, 23rd January.  150 British and colonial troops successfully defended the garrison against an intense assault by approximately 2000 Zulu warriors.  The intense and noisy Zulu attacks on Rorke's Drift came very close to defeating the tiny garrison, but were ultimately repelled by blasts of Martini-Henry rifle fire-and some smart bayonet work-with  some guts behind the bayonet thrusts!  Eleven Victoria Crosses were awarded to the defenders, along with a number of other decorations and honours.  Of particular note in the painting is the dog 'Pip' - he survived Isandlwhana by retreating along the fugitive's trail to Rorke's Drift.  During the Zulu attacks on Rorke's drift, Pip did his part in the defence - by jumping on the mealie bag parapets and barking at Zulus- who were hiding in the long grass and sneaking up to the defences, then biting any Zulu who came within range.  Unfortunately Pip was not officially recognised for his part in the action.  He was not awarded a VC, on the basis that he was a volunteer canine that accompanied an officer, rather than a War Office issued canine.  Conversely, if Pip had been killed, then he would not have been officially listed as a casualty, as he accompanied the army in a strictly private capacity.  British army horses were in a different category as they were War Office issue, therefore the loss of a horse in action, or to disease, carried a financial liability for the War Office.

The Defence of Rorke's Drift by Jason Askew.
Half Price! - £45.00
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