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Military and aviation arist David Pentland.  His entire range of German armour and other military forces are available at great discounted prices direct from The Military Art Company Ivan Berryman is recognised as one of the leading aviation and naval artists, his entire range of prints published by Cranston Fine Arts are available direct from us, including many original aviation paintings.
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Royal Ascot Jubilee 2002 by Peter Curling.


Royal Ascot Jubilee 2002 by Peter Curling.

Item Code : GL0022Royal Ascot Jubilee 2002 by Peter Curling. - This Edition
TYPEEDITION DETAILSSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSYOUR PRICEPURCHASING
PRINTLimited edition of 950 gouttelette prints. Image size 11.5 inches x 24 inches (30cm x 61cm)none171.00

Quantity:
All prices on our website are displayed in British Pounds Sterling


Artist Details : Peter Curling
Click here for a full list of all artwork by Peter Curling


Peter Curling

Born in Waterford in Ireland in 1955, Peter Curlings family moved to England in 1963, where he received his education. He then travelled to Florence to study drawing with the eminent tutor Signorini Nera Simi and, during his time in Italy, he also met, studied with and was heavily influenced by John Skeaping R.A. Peter Curling has been fascinated by horses since his earliest childhood and he was allowed to visit the local stable, and sketch and paint there whilst he was at school in England. He lived for a time, in Newmarket. riding out with the eminent trainer Michael Stoute. before returning permanently to Ireland in 1975. In Ireland. he devoted equal attention to horses and to art, riding out for Eddie OGrady and eben riding his own horse, Caddy, to victory an Limerick Junction in 1985. He therefore paints in the equestrian world very much front the inside. His eloquent and flowing portrayals of the racing world have a unique clarity and naturalness and since his victory in the 1991 Seagram Grand National Equestrian Artists Competition and his first one man show in Dublin in 1982, his work has been exhibited at a number of prestigious venues all over the world. Peter Curlings limited edition print of Istabraq winning the 1998 Cheltenham Champion Hurdle has already raised 100,000 for The John Durkan Leukaemia Trust Fund. The Fund was established to raise funds for cancer research in honour of John Durkat, who died of leukaemia before he was able to see the horse which he had selected ride to victory in the biggest race in the National Hunt calendar.

More about Peter Curling

This Week's Half Price Art

The Battle at Rorke's Drift, also known as the Defence of Rorke's Drift, was an action in the Anglo-Zulu War. The defence of the mission station of Rorke's Drift, under the command of Lieutenant John Chard of the Royal Engineers, immediately followed the British Army's defeat at the Battle of Isandlwana on 22nd January 1879, and continued into the following day, 23rd January.  150 British and colonial troops successfully defended the garrison against an intense assault by approximately 2000 Zulu warriors. The intense and noisy Zulu attacks on Rorke's Drift came very close to defeating the tiny garrison, but were ultimately repelled by blasts of Martini-Henry rifle fire-and some smart bayonet work-with some guts behind the bayonet thrusts! Eleven Victoria Crosses were awarded to the defenders, along with a number of other decorations and honours. Of particular note in the painting is the dog 'Pip' - he survived Isandlwhana by retreating along the fugitive's trail to Rorke's Drift. During the Zulu attacks on Rorke's drift, Pip did his part in the defence - by jumping on the mealie bag parapets and barking at Zulus- who were hiding in the long grass and sneaking up to the defences, then biting any Zulu who came within range. Unfortunately Pip was not officially recognised for his part in the action. He was not awarded a VC, on the basis that he was a volunteer canine that accompanied an officer, rather than a War Office issued canine. Conversely, if Pip had been killed, then he would not have been officially listed as a casualty, as he accompanied the army in a strictly private capacity. British army horses were in a different category as they were War Office issue, therefore the loss of a horse in action, or to disease, carried a financial liability for the War Office.

The Defence of Rorke's Drift by Jason Askew. (P)
Half Price! - 3200.00
 Medical Emergency Response Team.

Training Inside the MERT by Graeme Lothian. (P)
Half Price! - 1800.00
 A Grenadier of the Old Guard in tenue des climanches, with beige breeches and white stockings, he is shown playing with a small child while on leave.

The Veteran at Home by Horace Vernet. (Y)
Half Price! - 25.00
 Under pressure from Stalin to open a second front in Europe, Operation Jubilee was designed ostensibly as a reconnaissance in force on the French coast, to show the feasibility of taking and holding a major defended port for a day, in this case Dieppe. The plan devised by Lord Louis Mountbatten failed due to inadequate naval and air support, carrying out the landing in daylight and general lack of intelligence of the target. Here new Churchill tanks of the 14th Canadian Tank Regiment (The Calgary Regiment), with men of the Royal Hamilton Light Infantry and Fusiliers Mont-Royals, struggle to fight their way off the beach. Only a handful of men penetrated into the town itself, and eventually the remaining troops were ordered to withdraw. Out of 5086 soldiers who landed only 1443 returned.

Disaster at Dieppe, France, 19th August 1942 by David Pentland. (Y)
Half Price! - 50.00

 Superb figure study of the 82nd Airborne in 1944.

82nd Airborne by Chris Collingwood.
Half Price! - 80.00
 Troops of the 1st Hampshires assaulting Gold Beach during the Normandy Landings. Gold beach was one of the British beaches on D-Day. Gold beach was the western most beach of the British beaches, on D-Day. Gold beach was between two twenty metre high cliffs where German fortifications had been built. The beach had been protected by concrete casemates which took some time to break through. This happened with support form British tanks in the afternoon of D-day 6th June. The British tanks and reinforcements moved off the beaches towards Saint-Come-de-Fresene and Arromanches which were both liberated by 9pm.

D-Day Gold Beach, 6th June 1944 by Simon Smith.
Half Price! - 75.00
The first fight for independence of the American Revolution. The Battle of Lexington, known as Lexington Common, is where the opening shots of the American Revolution of 1775 took place. The Common had been purchased by subscription of some of the towns leading citizens in 1711.  The engagement took place oon April 19th 1775.  Lt Col Francis Smith wiith 700 men under his command was given secret orders to capture and destroy military supplies that were reportedly stored by the Massachusetts militia at Concord. But Patriot colonials had received word weeks before the expedition that their supplies might be at risk, and had moved the supplies to other stores.  They were also given word that the British were on their way and a rapid deployment of the militia was undertaken. The first shots were fired just as the sun was rising at Lexington. The Minutemen were outnumbered and withdrew, as the British proceeded on to Concord. At the North Bridge in Concord they were meet by a force of several hundred militiamen who defeated the British three companies of the Kings troops, who withdrew  More Minutemen arrived soon thereafter and inflicted heavy damage on the regulars as they marched back towards Boston. Upon returning to Lexington, Smiths expedition was rescued by reinforcements.  The whole British force of some 1700 men withdrew back to Boston.

Battle of Lexington by William Barnes Wollen. (Y)
Half Price! - 30.00
The Carabiniers return after their successful charge and with a captured Russian standard.
The Return of the Carabiniers after the Charge by Edouard Detaille. (Y)
Half Price! - 300.00
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