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An Irish Point-to-Point by Peter Curling.


An Irish Point-to-Point by Peter Curling.

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AMAZING VALUE! - The value of the signatures on this item is in excess of the price of the print itself!
Item Code : LIM0545An Irish Point-to-Point by Peter Curling. - This Edition
TYPEEDITION DETAILSSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSYOUR PRICEPURCHASING
PRINTLimited edition of 525 prints.

Image size 17 inches x 25 inches (43cm x 64cm)Artist : Peter CurlingSOLD
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Artist Details : Peter Curling
Click here for a full list of all artwork by Peter Curling


Peter Curling

Born in Waterford in Ireland in 1955, Peter Curlings family moved to England in 1963, where he received his education. He then travelled to Florence to study drawing with the eminent tutor Signorini Nera Simi and, during his time in Italy, he also met, studied with and was heavily influenced by John Skeaping R.A. Peter Curling has been fascinated by horses since his earliest childhood and he was allowed to visit the local stable, and sketch and paint there whilst he was at school in England. He lived for a time, in Newmarket. riding out with the eminent trainer Michael Stoute. before returning permanently to Ireland in 1975. In Ireland. he devoted equal attention to horses and to art, riding out for Eddie OGrady and eben riding his own horse, Caddy, to victory an Limerick Junction in 1985. He therefore paints in the equestrian world very much front the inside. His eloquent and flowing portrayals of the racing world have a unique clarity and naturalness and since his victory in the 1991 Seagram Grand National Equestrian Artists Competition and his first one man show in Dublin in 1982, his work has been exhibited at a number of prestigious venues all over the world. Peter Curlings limited edition print of Istabraq winning the 1998 Cheltenham Champion Hurdle has already raised 100,000 for The John Durkan Leukaemia Trust Fund. The Fund was established to raise funds for cancer research in honour of John Durkat, who died of leukaemia before he was able to see the horse which he had selected ride to victory in the biggest race in the National Hunt calendar.

More about Peter Curling

This Week's Half Price Art

 Driven by revenge for the brutal treatment she had suffered at the hands of the Romans, Queen Boadicea led the Iceni and her allies the Trinovantas in open revolt. The IX Legion Hispania was despatched to suppress the insurrection but were ambushed en route. Only the commander Petilius Cerealis, and a handful of cavalry escaped.

Ambush of the IX Legion by Brian Palmer (P)
Half Price! - £1700.00
Cruiser Tanks of 1st Royal Tank Regiment at the Battle of Beda Fomm.  6th February 1941: My friend Lt Col G Vesey Holt RTR has always considered that the deeds of 1 RTR at Beda Fomm have been neglected. To put this right he commissioned me to do a painting which he then presented to his Regiment. He obtained copies of the Regiment's War Diary. I was also greatly assisted by the staff of the Tank Museum, Bovington, which has examples of these tanks on display. On 6th February 1941, a column of Italian tanks and transport vehicles was proceeding southwards along the Benghasi-Tripoli road. In the late afternoon, B squadron engaged the enemy at about 500 yards from a hull down position behind a ridge, while five or six Cruisers of A Squadron crossed the road and proceeded south amongst the Italian column, firing on the transport and guns. It was raining heavily and visibility was poor.  The scene was littered with burning wreckage of Italian M13 tank and lorries. At about 1720 hours visibility became so bad that it was almost impossible to distinguish between friend and foe, and the tanks withdrew to re-group. No British tank was destroyed, though one was left damaged.  A Squadron is indicated by the triangle on the turrets, (red for the senior regiment in the brigade). An A9 is closest, with an A10 beyond. Commanders were almost invariably visible with their hatches open. The pennants on the antenna were a recognition sign, worn at different heights which changed daily. The white circle on a red square was the sign of 7th Armoured Division. The regiment's unit code sign was a white 24 on a red square. At this period British tanks had the multi-coloured diagonally striped pattern of camouflage.  The Cruiser A9 (Mark 1) had one 2-pounder gun and one .303-in. Vickers machine-gun mounted co-axially in the main turret, and one .303-in. Vickers mg in each of the two auxiliary turrets.  The Cruiser A10 (Mark 1A) had one 2-pounder gun and two 7.92-mm Besa machine-guns.

The Battle of Beda Fomm by David Rowlands (B)
Half Price! - £20.00
 Flanked by his Companion heavy cavalry, Alexander, King of Macedon, led the charge which broke through the left wing of the Persian army, and forced Darius, the Great King, to flee the battlefield. Persian success against his own left wing forced him to delay his pursuit of the routed troops, but by the end of the day the battle was won, and the heart of the Persian empire lay at his feet.

Alexander at Arbela, Plain of Gaugamela, Iraq, 331BC by David Pentland. (YB)
Half Price! - £295.00
During the Second World War, a division of troops was specially trained in Commando methods to infiltrate behind the Japanese lines in Burma. They became known as Chindits, the name given to them by their leader, Major-General Orde Wingate. In March 1944, a plan was formed to land them by air in the jungle.  Two landing sites were identified, but immediately before take-off one was reported to be obstructed by logs, and therefore the expedition landed at the site code-named Broadway. 26 C47 Dakota transport aircraft of the US 1st Air Commando took off in the evening, each one towing two Waco gliders. 37 of these arrived at Broadway. 30 men were killed and 33 injured as the gliders bumped and swerved in the jungle clearing that first night. Almost all the gliders were damaged or destroyed as they hit obstacles or crashed into each other in the darkness. Men were running all over the field, shouting instructions and trying to clear the runway of wreckage. Often, those trying to help wounded men off the field would have to duck out of the path of a landing glider. The Chindits disembarked from the side doors of the gliders, ready for action, and fanned out to form a perimeter at the edge of the jungle all round the landing site. Four bulldozers were also landed, and their task was to improve the landing site for the C47 transports to follow.  Colonel WP Scott, commanding the 1st Battalion of The King's Regiment (Liverpool), was in the first glider. His task was to rake the surrounding jungle with his Tommy gun and if he received answering fire, he was to fire a red Verey flare to warn the rest not to land on Target 1. Eight hours before take-off he said, +I've got that flare so deep in my pocket that I doubt if anyone else can find it if I'm killed.+ There being no Target 2, or no way of getting back from Target 1, he chose that casual way of announcing that the Chindits would fight for the airstrip site even if they found a Japanese Division sitting on it when the gliders started to come down. The Broadway landing paved the way for the retaking of Burma.

Chindits landing at Broadway, Burma, 5th / 6th March 1944 by David Rowlands (GS)
Half Price! - £250.00

Robert The Bruce dispatches Sir Henry De Bohun before the Battle of Bannockburn.  Far ahead of Edward IIs main army, marching from Falkirk to relieve Stirling Castle, rides the English vanguard. Late on that day, 23rd June 1314, these horsemen advance along the Roman road and cross Bannockburn. Eager for combat Gloucesters bold Barons and Knights spur on their chargers towards the gathered Scottish infantry. Robert the Bruce, King of Scots, not yet fully dressed for battle, sits astride a grey pony. He rides out ahead of his formations to observe the enemys advance. One of the English Knights, Sir Henry De Bohun, seeing the Kings vulnerable position, gallops ahead of his fellows to engage Bruce in single combat. Undaunted, the King holds his ground. Skillfully turning his mount away from the thrust of the Knights deadly lance in one movement he swings his battle axe down upon his enemys head with such force that the handle is shattered and the unfortunate attackers skull is split in two. In triumph, Bruce returns to the cheers of his countrymen who before the day is out will soon deliver a similar fate upon many other English noblemen. As the light fades the Riders retire but both armies know well that the main battle of Bannockburn has yet to begin.

In Single Combat by Mark Churms. (P)
Half Price! - £3500.00
DHM1091.  The Defence of Le Haye Saint by the Kings German Legion by Adolf von Northern.

The Defence of Le Haye Saint by the Kings German Legion by Adolf Northern.
Half Price! - £33.00
 The drummer boys of the 57th (die-hards) drawn up under fire on the ridge of Albuera, (16th May 1811), Peninsula war.

Steady the Drums and Fifes by Lady Elizabeth Butler (B)
Half Price! - £25.00
35 Engineer Regiment 2000

Close Support by David Rowlands (GL)
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