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The Big Double by Peter Curling.

The Big Double by Peter Curling.

Depicting the famous obstacle on Punchestown racecourse known as The Big Double.
AMAZING VALUE! - The value of the signatures on this item is in excess of the price of the print itself!
Item Code : LIM0498The Big Double by Peter Curling. - This Edition
PRINT Signed limited edition of 600 prints.

SOLD OUT (Dec 2008)
Image size 20 inches x 30 inches (51cm x 76cm)Artist : Peter CurlingSOLD
All prices on our website are displayed in British Pounds Sterling

Artist Details : Peter Curling
Click here for a full list of all artwork by Peter Curling

Peter Curling

Born in Waterford in Ireland in 1955, Peter Curlings family moved to England in 1963, where he received his education. He then travelled to Florence to study drawing with the eminent tutor Signorini Nera Simi and, during his time in Italy, he also met, studied with and was heavily influenced by John Skeaping R.A. Peter Curling has been fascinated by horses since his earliest childhood and he was allowed to visit the local stable, and sketch and paint there whilst he was at school in England. He lived for a time, in Newmarket. riding out with the eminent trainer Michael Stoute. before returning permanently to Ireland in 1975. In Ireland. he devoted equal attention to horses and to art, riding out for Eddie OGrady and eben riding his own horse, Caddy, to victory an Limerick Junction in 1985. He therefore paints in the equestrian world very much front the inside. His eloquent and flowing portrayals of the racing world have a unique clarity and naturalness and since his victory in the 1991 Seagram Grand National Equestrian Artists Competition and his first one man show in Dublin in 1982, his work has been exhibited at a number of prestigious venues all over the world. Peter Curlings limited edition print of Istabraq winning the 1998 Cheltenham Champion Hurdle has already raised 100,000 for The John Durkan Leukaemia Trust Fund. The Fund was established to raise funds for cancer research in honour of John Durkat, who died of leukaemia before he was able to see the horse which he had selected ride to victory in the biggest race in the National Hunt calendar.

More about Peter Curling

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