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This Week's Half Price Art

 Captain F Macbeans Company, 1st Battalion Royal Artillery in action on the right of the British line, firing its 12 pounder guns against French Cavalry and Infantry. By permission of David Rowlands.  Battle of Minden  1st August 1759.  Major battle of the Seven years war.  After the French victory in April at Bergen, The French Army 60,000 strong under the command of Duc Louis de Contades marched northwards towards Hanover.   To block this French Advance the Prussian Army under Field Marshall The Duke of Brunswick decided to hold the line at Minden.  The Duke of Brunswick could only raise a force of 45,000 men including a British Contingent under Lord George Sackville of 6 regiments, a detachment of cavalry and some artillery.   The French opened the battle attacking,  the British Infantry regiments probably due to a misunderstanding, advanced and they were followed by the Hanoverian Infantry.  They attacked the French cavalry.  The Infantry advanced only stopping to let off a volleys of fire.  This unconventional use of Infantry against cavalry, the French force confused and suffering losses broke.  The victory was in Ferdinands grasp, he ordered his cavalry forward but the British general Sackville refused to send his cavalry after the French. For this action he was later court-martialled by King George II and cashiered from the army.  The French were able to withdraw in order, but their losses had been 7,000 men and 43 artillery guns.   The British and Hanoverian losses were less than 3,000 with 1500 of these casualties inflicted on the British Infantry.  This battle ended all French hopes of capturing Hanover.  British Regiments at Minden. 12th of Foot. (Suffolk Regiment)  20th Foot. (Lancashire Fusiliers ) 23rd of Foot. (Welch Fusiliers),  25th of Foot, (Kings own Scottish Borderers), 37th of Foot. (Royal Hampshire Regiment),  51st Foot   (Kings own Yorkshire Light Infantry)

The Battle of Minden, 1st August 1759 by David Rowlands. (GL)
Half Price! - £300.00
With the full might of Englands Army now gathered to do battle before the besieged Stirling Castle, the young Edward II Plantagenate is confident of victory over the enemy. To the west of the Bannockburn, Robert Bruce, King of Scots kneels to pray with his men and commends his soul to God. The Scottish battle lines are prepared. The Cavalry is in reserve to the rear behind the spearmen and archers (known as Flower of the forest) in tightly packed Schiltrons patiently awaiting the coming onslaught. Unknown to the English, the open marshy ground of no mans land conceals hidden pits and trenches, major obstacles for any mounted charge.  Despite Cliffords and de Beaumonts premature and unsuccessful attempt to relieve the castle the day before, years of victory have taught the brave English knights to regard their Scottish foes with contempt. So, without waiting for the bowmen to effectively weaken the enemy lines the order is hurriedly given to attack! With one rush hundreds of mounted knights led by the impetuous Earl of Gloucester thunder headlong through the boggy ground straight for the impenetrable forest of spears and into defeat and death.  With dash and courage the knights try to force a way through the mass of spears but the Scots stand firm. The momentum of the charge is lost and there is no room to manoeuvre. Everywhere horses and men crash to the ground, casualties amongst the English are horrific. Robert Bruce seizes the moment and orders the exultant army to advance. The Englishmen are slowly pushed back into the waters of the Bannockburn. All discipline is lost as the soldiers and horses madly scramble for the far bank of the burn. Many drown or perish in the crush to escape the deadly melee. Edward II, with his army destroyed, flees with his bodyguard for the safety of Stirling Castle but is refused refuge and has to fight his way south to England. For Robert Bruce and Scotland victory is complete.
Text by Paul Scarron-Jones.

Battle of Bannockburn by Mark Churms. (P)
Half Price! - £13000.00
DHM186.  The Charge of the 6th Inniskilling Dragoons at Tolnay by William Barnes Wollen.

The Charge of the 6th Inniskilling Dragoons at Tolnay by William Barnes Wollen.
Half Price! - £30.00
 This subject shows the Duke of Wellington, Arthur Wellesley, offering encouragement to the infantry at some stage in the battle.

The Battle of Waterloo by Robert Hillingford (B)
Half Price! - £30.00

DHM1625GM. 13th Light Dragoons at Windsor Castle by Chris Collingwood.

13th Light Dragoons at Windsor Castle by Chris Collingwood. (GM)
Half Price! - £300.00
 Captain R. Blair Paddy Mayne, and men of L detachment SAS, stop to discuss their location en route to Sidi Haneish airfield. The raid was a major victory, especially for the newly acquired jeeps, which played an important part in the destruction of some 40 enemy aircraft for the loss of one man.

Paddys Troopers, The Sidi Haneish Road, 17th July 1942 by David Pentland. (GS)
Half Price! - £250.00
 Unterscharfurher Karl-Heinz Turk of the Schwere SS Panzerabteilung 503, in one of the units few remaining Kingtigers, defends the Potsdammer Platz along with elements of the Munchberg Division against the rapidly encroaching Soviet forces.

The Last Battle, Berlin, April 30th 1945 by David Pentland. (GL)
Half Price! - £300.00
Last stand of the 24th South Wales Borderers at Isandhlwana during the Zulu War.  The battle of Isandhlwana, a Zulu victory over the British forces on 22nd January 1879 about 100km north of Durban.  Lord Chelmsford led a column of forces to seek out the Zulu army camped at Isandhlwana, while patrols searched the district.  After receiving a report, Chelmsford set forth at half strength, leaving six companies of the 24th Regiment, two guns, some Colonial Volunteers and a native contingent (in all about 1,800 troops) at the camp.  Later that morning an advanced post warned of an approaching Zulu army.  Shortly after this, thousands of Zulus were found hidden in a ravine by a mounted patrol but as the patrol set off to warn the camp, the Zulus followed.  At the orders of the Camp Commander, troops spread out around the perimeter of the camp, but the Zulu army broke through their defences.  The native contingent who fled during the attack were hunted down and killed.  The remaining troops of the 24th Regiment, 534 soldiers and 21 officers, were killed where they fought.  The Zulus left no one alive, taking no prisoners and leaving no wounded or missing.  About 300 Africans and 50 Europeans escaped the attack.  Consequently, the invasion of Zulu country was delayed while reinforcements arrived from Britain.

Battle of Isandhlwana, 22nd January 1879 by Brian Palmer. (P)
Half Price! - £1800.00
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