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DHM1381.  The Battle of Trafalgar, 1.00pm by Ivan Berryman.  <p>Having taken terrible punishment from the guns of the allied French and Spanish fleet as she broke through the line, HMS Victory found herself engaged by the French Redoutable, a bitter battle that saw the two ships locked together, pouring shot into one another with terrifying ferocity and which left the British Admiral, Lord Horatio Nelson fatally wounded.  In the background, HMS Neptune is emerging through the gunsmoke and is about to pass the wreck of the French flagship Bucentaure which Victory so spectacularly routed as she passed through the allied line.  HMS Temeraire, which followed Victory through, and which was also to become embroiled on the Redoutables fight, is obscured by the smoke beyond the British flagship. <b><p> Signed limited edition of 1150 prints. <p> Image size 25 inches x 16 inches (64cm x 41cm)
DHM1165.  The Battle of Trafalgar, 21st October 1805 by Ivan Berryman. <p>One of the most decisive battles in the history of the Royal Navy, Nelsons defeat of the French fleet took place on 21st October 1805 off Cape Trafalgar and was conducted with not a single British ship lost, although few ships escaped severe punishment and loss of life on both sides was tragically high<b><p> Signed limited edition of 1150 prints.  <p>Image size 25 inches x 17 inches (64cm x 43cm)
DHM1278.  Prelude to Trafalgar by Ivan Berryman.  <p>21st October 1805. As Admiral Nelsons flagship leads the British fleet towards the Franco-Spanish line, Captain Harveys Temeraire tries to pass the Victory in order to be the first to break the enemy column.  Harvey was discouraged with a customry rebuke from Nelson and duly fell into line behind the flagship.  The enemy can be seen spread along the horizon whilst, to the right in the distance, the leading ships of Admiral Collingwoods fleet can be seen spearheading a separate assault to the south.  In the light airs preceding the battle, much sail was needed to drive the British ships towards the enemy line. HMS Victory, nearest, has royals and stunsails set and is making good way, her furniture boats strung behind in readiness for battle.  On her poop deck, officers prepare to run up a signal.  <b><p> Signed limited edition of 1150 prints. <p> Image size 25 inches x 17 inches (64cm x 43cm)
DHM1406. Trafalgar Aftermath  by Ivan Berryman. <p> Jury rigged and battered by the relentless gunnery of the French and Spanish fleets at Trafalgar, HMS Victory lies off the coast of Gibraltar as crews from HMS Neptune (nearest) are despatched to take over the tow from the Polyphemus for the final leg of their journey to relative safety, the flagship still bearing the body of Admiral Lord Horatio Nelson. <b><p> Signed linmited edition of 1150 prints. <p>Image size 25 inches x 17 inches (64cm x 43cm)
B153.  The Battle of Trafalgar, 2.30pm.  The Taking of the Santisima Trinidad by Ivan Berryman. <p> Dominating the centre foreground, the wreck of the largest ship at Trafalgar, the massive four decker Santisima Trinidad (130 guns), comes under further attack from the British Neptune (98 guns)  All her masts have fallen, rendering the Spanish giant an unmanageable hulk.  Elsewhere, the battle rages on with Temeraire and Victory engaged with the French Redoubtable, while to the right of the picture, the shattered, drifting remains of Villeneuves Bucentaure (80 guns) is approached by the Mars (74 guns)  Conqueror (74 guns), off the Santisima Trinidads port quarter, is keeping up a distant fire to assist the Neptune. <b><p> Signed black and white limited edition of 1150 prints.  <p>Image size 12 inches x 9 inches (31cm x 23cm)
B124.  Trafalgar - The Destruction of the Bucentaure by Ivan Berryman. <p>With her mizzen top already gone and her sails aloft having received severe punishment, Victory breaks through the line behind the French flagship Bucentaure, delivering a shattering broadside into her stern.  So severe was this opening fire that the Bucentaure was effectively put out of the rest of the battle, although Admiral Villeneuve himself was to miraculously survive the carnage.  Beyong Victory can be seen the French Redoubtable, which is receiving fire from Victorys starboard guns, and the Spanish San Leandro is in the extreme distance.  Most of Victorys stunsails have been cut away, but it was her stunsail booms that became entangled with the rigging of the Redoubtable when she put her helm to port and ran onto her.  Admiral Nelson fell shortly afterward, having received a fatal wound from a musket ball fired by a French sharpshooter in Redoubtables mizzen fighting top.  The Temeraire can be seen approaching the fray to the right.<b><p>Signed limited edition of 1150 prints.   <p> Image size 12 inches x 8 inches (31cm x 20cm)

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  Website Price: £ 220.00  

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Four HMS Victory at Trafalgar Prints.

DPK0094. Pack of four naval art prints by Ivan Berryman depicting HMS Victory at the Battle of Trafalgar.

Items in this pack :

Item #1 - Click to view individual item

DHM1381. The Battle of Trafalgar, 1.00pm by Ivan Berryman.

Having taken terrible punishment from the guns of the allied French and Spanish fleet as she broke through the line, HMS Victory found herself engaged by the French Redoutable, a bitter battle that saw the two ships locked together, pouring shot into one another with terrifying ferocity and which left the British Admiral, Lord Horatio Nelson fatally wounded. In the background, HMS Neptune is emerging through the gunsmoke and is about to pass the wreck of the French flagship Bucentaure which Victory so spectacularly routed as she passed through the allied line. HMS Temeraire, which followed Victory through, and which was also to become embroiled on the Redoutables fight, is obscured by the smoke beyond the British flagship.

Signed limited edition of 1150 prints.

Image size 25 inches x 16 inches (64cm x 41cm)


Item #2 - Click to view individual item

DHM1165. The Battle of Trafalgar, 21st October 1805 by Ivan Berryman.

One of the most decisive battles in the history of the Royal Navy, Nelsons defeat of the French fleet took place on 21st October 1805 off Cape Trafalgar and was conducted with not a single British ship lost, although few ships escaped severe punishment and loss of life on both sides was tragically high

Signed limited edition of 1150 prints.

Image size 25 inches x 17 inches (64cm x 43cm)


Item #3 - Click to view individual item

DHM1278. Prelude to Trafalgar by Ivan Berryman.

21st October 1805. As Admiral Nelsons flagship leads the British fleet towards the Franco-Spanish line, Captain Harveys Temeraire tries to pass the Victory in order to be the first to break the enemy column. Harvey was discouraged with a customry rebuke from Nelson and duly fell into line behind the flagship. The enemy can be seen spread along the horizon whilst, to the right in the distance, the leading ships of Admiral Collingwoods fleet can be seen spearheading a separate assault to the south. In the light airs preceding the battle, much sail was needed to drive the British ships towards the enemy line. HMS Victory, nearest, has royals and stunsails set and is making good way, her furniture boats strung behind in readiness for battle. On her poop deck, officers prepare to run up a signal.

Signed limited edition of 1150 prints.

Image size 25 inches x 17 inches (64cm x 43cm)


Item #4 - Click to view individual item

DHM1406. Trafalgar Aftermath by Ivan Berryman.

Jury rigged and battered by the relentless gunnery of the French and Spanish fleets at Trafalgar, HMS Victory lies off the coast of Gibraltar as crews from HMS Neptune (nearest) are despatched to take over the tow from the Polyphemus for the final leg of their journey to relative safety, the flagship still bearing the body of Admiral Lord Horatio Nelson.

Signed linmited edition of 1150 prints.

Image size 25 inches x 17 inches (64cm x 43cm)


Item #5 - Click to view individual item

B153. The Battle of Trafalgar, 2.30pm. The Taking of the Santisima Trinidad by Ivan Berryman.

Dominating the centre foreground, the wreck of the largest ship at Trafalgar, the massive four decker Santisima Trinidad (130 guns), comes under further attack from the British Neptune (98 guns) All her masts have fallen, rendering the Spanish giant an unmanageable hulk. Elsewhere, the battle rages on with Temeraire and Victory engaged with the French Redoubtable, while to the right of the picture, the shattered, drifting remains of Villeneuves Bucentaure (80 guns) is approached by the Mars (74 guns) Conqueror (74 guns), off the Santisima Trinidads port quarter, is keeping up a distant fire to assist the Neptune.

Signed black and white limited edition of 1150 prints.

Image size 12 inches x 9 inches (31cm x 23cm)


Item #6 - Click to view individual item

B124. Trafalgar - The Destruction of the Bucentaure by Ivan Berryman.

With her mizzen top already gone and her sails aloft having received severe punishment, Victory breaks through the line behind the French flagship Bucentaure, delivering a shattering broadside into her stern. So severe was this opening fire that the Bucentaure was effectively put out of the rest of the battle, although Admiral Villeneuve himself was to miraculously survive the carnage. Beyong Victory can be seen the French Redoubtable, which is receiving fire from Victorys starboard guns, and the Spanish San Leandro is in the extreme distance. Most of Victorys stunsails have been cut away, but it was her stunsail booms that became entangled with the rigging of the Redoubtable when she put her helm to port and ran onto her. Admiral Nelson fell shortly afterward, having received a fatal wound from a musket ball fired by a French sharpshooter in Redoubtables mizzen fighting top. The Temeraire can be seen approaching the fray to the right.

Signed limited edition of 1150 prints.

Image size 12 inches x 8 inches (31cm x 20cm)


Website Price: £ 220.00  

To purchase these prints individually at their normal retail price would cost £625.00 . By buying them together in this special pack, you save £405




All prices are displayed in British Pounds Sterling

 

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