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Lester by Susan Crawford.


Lester by Susan Crawford.

Susan Crawfords latest limited edition depicts legendary jockey Lester Piggott in the colours of the late Lord Howard de Walden, for whom he rode 39 winners. Lord Howard de Walden was a good friend and patron and this subject was painted by the artist in his memory. The original painting was auctioned in November 2000 to raise money for The Sir Peter OSullevan Charitable Trust. The Trust benefits six animal welfare charities around the world: The Blue Cross, the Brooke Hospital for Animals in Cairo, Compassion in World Farming, the International League for the Protection of Horses, the Thoroughbred Rehabilitation Centre and Racing Welfare Charities.
AMAZING VALUE! - The value of the signatures on this item is in excess of the price of the print itself!
Item Code : LIM0512Lester by Susan Crawford. - This Edition
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PRINT Signed limited edition of 1500 prints.

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Image size 9.5 inches x 9.5 inches (24cm x 24cm)Artist : Susan CrawfordSOLD
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Artist Details : Susan Crawford
Click here for a full list of all artwork by Susan Crawford


Susan Crawford

Susan Crawford is one of Britains finest contemporary equestrian artists. Born in the Scottish district of East Lothian in 1941, she grew up on the family farm on which her parents trained racehorses. She learned to ride in her infancy and soon began to express her passion for horses on canvas. Apart from her two year training at the Florentine drawing school of Signorini Nera Suni, Susan Crawlord is entirely self-taught. She has exhibited at a number of distinguished galleries throughout the world, including The National Portrait Gallery, The Royal Academy of Arts. The Tryon Gallery, London, and The National Gallery of Pahang Pinang, Malaysia. Amongst her many fine works, Susan Crawford has painted twenty-one Epsom Derby winners and great steeple-chasers including Red Rum, Arkle and Desert Orchid. However, despite her high profile as an equestrian artist, she is also well-established as a painter of portraits. Sue has painted five members of the British Royal family, including HM Queen Elizabeth The Queen Mother, HM The Queen and HRH The Prince of Wales, as well as HH The Sultan of Brunei and HM The Sultan of Oman.

More about Susan Crawford

This Week's Half Price Art

DHM652.  The Prussian Trumpeter by Richard Knotel.

The Prussian Trumpeter by Richard Knotel.
Half Price! - £20.00
 The Battle of Aliwal was fought on 28th January 1846 between the British and the Sikhs.  The British were led by Sir Harry Smith, while the Sikhs were led by Ranjodh Singh Majithia.  The British won a victory which is sometimes regarded as the turning point of the First Anglo-Sikh War.  The Sikhs had occupied a position 4 miles (6.4 km) long, which ran along a ridge between the villages of Aliwal, on the Sutlej, and Bhundri.  The Sutlej ran close to their rear for the entire length of their line, making it difficult for them to manoeuvre and also potentially disastrous if they were forced to retreat.  After the initial artillery salvoes, Smith determined that Aliwal was the Sikh weak point.  He sent two of his four infantry brigades to capture the village, from where they could enfilade the Sikh centre.  They seized the village, and began pressing forwards to threaten the fords across the Sutlej.  As the Sikhs tried to swing back their left, pivoting on Bhundri, some of their cavalry tried to threaten the open British left flank.  A British and Indian cavalry brigade, led by the 16th Lancers, charged and dispersed them.  The 16th Lancers then attacked a large body of Sikh infantry.  These were battalions organised and trained in contemporary European fashion by Neapolitan mercenary, Paolo Di Avitabile.  They formed square to receive cavalry, as most European armies did.  Nevertheless, the 16th Lancers broke them, with heavy casualties.  The infantry in the Sikh centre tried to defend a nullah (dry stream bed), but were enfiladed and forced into the open by a Bengal infantry regiment, and then cut down by fire from Smith's batteries of Bengal Horse Artillery.  Unlike most of the battles of both Anglo-Sikh Wars, when the Sikhs at Aliwal began to retreat, the retreat quickly turned into a disorderly rout across the fords.  Most of the Sikh guns were abandoned, either on the river bank or in the fords, along with all baggage, tents and supplies.  They lost 2,000 men and 67 guns. <i><br><br>Comment from the artist, Jason Askew.</i><br><br>This painting shows the extremely violent and brutal clash between British cavalry (16th Lancers) and Sikh infantry at the battle of Aliwal.  The Sikh infantry formed 2 triangles, a version of the famous Allied/British squares used at Waterloo, but the Sikhs, after firing a ragged volley at the attacking horsemen, dropped their muskets and assaulted the cavalry with their traditional Tulwars (sabres) and dhal shields.  These shields are also used offensively, to punch, and to slice with the edge.  Although the British horsemen claimed a victory as they felt they successfully dispersed the Sikh triangles, and forced the Sikh infantry to retreat to the nullah (dry stream bed) in the Sikh rear, this opinion is open to debate.  The Sikhs traditionally fought in loose formations, with tulwar and shield-taking full advantage of their abilities as swordsmen, blades being weapons with which the Sikhs are particularly skilled in the use of.  The Sikhs actually inflicted more casualties on the 16th Lancers than the lancers inflicted on the Sikh infantry.  British eye witnesses spoke of the sight of the grotesquely swollen and distorted dead bodies of men and horses of the Her Majesty's 16th Lancers, stinking in the sun and littering the ground at Aliwal - testimony to the progress of their charge.  The regiment lost 27% of effectives out of a total strength of over 400 effectives.  The lancers were dreadfully hacked about, many being cruelly maimed for life, losing hands and limbs to the slashing strokes of the Sikh blades.  The Sikhs had no compassion for the cavalry horses either - many of the poor animals (over 100 by some accounts) had to be shot, due to having their legs hacked clean off, or being literally disemboweled by Sikh Tulwars.  In the painting, the central figure with the wizard-shaped Turban, is in fact an Akali - a sect of extremely religious Sikhs, who disdained the use of armour, and often fought to the death with a fanatical and suicidal devotion.

The Battle of Aliwal by Jason Askew. (GS)
Half Price! - £250.00
 Edward departs from his almost completed Rhuddlan Castle at the conclusion of his second Welsh campaign.

Edward the 1st in Wales by David Pentland.
Half Price! - £65.00
Fought at Bouvines a village in Flanders (now part of  France) Between the French army led by King Philip Augustus of France, against the combined forces of King John of England, The Holy Roman Emperor Otti IV, and Ferdinand Count of Flanders. Due to this French victory, Frederick of Hohenstaufen became Holy Roman Emperor Frederick II in 1215. and King John of England who could not wage war against France because of dwindling support was forced to sign the Magna Charter on June 15th 1215.

The Bataille de Bouvines 27th July 1214 by Horace Vernet (GS)
Half Price! - £200.00

This all time classic and great image shows the demoralised Napoleon sitting in the Palace of Fontainbleu, reflecting on the end of the imperial dream.

Napoleon After his Abdication 1814 by H Delaroche (GS)
Half Price! - £200.00
 Knowing that the battle of Bannockburn was lost, the Earl of Pembroke and Sir Giles d'Argentan led King Edward the 2nd from the field in much haste.  King Edward and his bodyguard had to fight their way through the Scots, who barred their escape.  King Edward had one horse killed under him, and only the heroic resistance of the earl of Pembroke's bodyguard prevented the Scots from capturing the English King.

King Edward II's Retreat from Bannockburn by Jason Askew. (P)
Half Price! - £750.00
 Abram M1A1 tanks and Bradley APCs of Charlie Company, the Cobras, 1-64 Desert Rogues Armoured Battalion, US 3rd Infantry Division (Mechanised) drive into central Baghdad, through Saddams famous war memorial.

Through the Hands of Victory, Baghdad, Iraq, 7th April 2003 by David Pentland. (Y)
Half Price! - £50.00
 Commandos of 1st Special Service Brigade, led by Lord Lovat, are piped past the defenders of the Caen canal (Pegasus) bridge by piper Bill Millin.  The bridge was originally taken in a coup de main attack by the gliders of 6th Airborne Divisions D Company, 2nd battalion Oxfordshire and Buckinghamshire Light Infantry, led by Major John Howard earlier that morning.  Shortly afterwards the glider troops were reinforced by 7 Parachute Battalion, and together they held the area against German attacks until the main British forces landing at Sword beach could fight through to join them.

Piper Bill, Pegasus Bridge, Normandy, 13.00hrs, 6th June 1944 by David Pentland. (P)
Half Price! - £1800.00
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