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Down the Back by Mark Smallman.


Down the Back by Mark Smallman.

AMAZING VALUE! - The value of the signatures on this item is in excess of the price of the print itself!
Item Code : FAR0561Down the Back by Mark Smallman. - This Edition
TYPEEDITION DETAILSSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSYOUR PRICEPURCHASING
PRINTOpen edition print.

SOLD OUT.
Image size 24.5 inches x 11 inches (62cm x 28cm)noneSOLD
OUT
NOT
AVAILABLE
All prices on our website are displayed in British Pounds Sterling


Since this edition is sold out and no other editions are available, here is a similar item which may be of interest :


Chasing for Gold by Chris Howells.

£100.00


Over The Last by Chris Howells.

£100.00

This Week's Half Price Art

 The 2nd Battalion centre company 1st Regiment of Foot Guards under attack from the French Red Lancers at Waterloo, 18th June 1815.

Red Square by Chris Collingwood. (GL)
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Stonewall Jackson with the Stonewall Brigade during the Valley Campaign of 1862.

Thomas Jonathan (Stonewall) Jackson by Chris Collingwood. (GL)
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 While probing forward near Cagny on the initial day of the Goodwood offensive, Lt John Gorman, a troop commander of 2nd Armoured Battalion, Irish Guards, suddenly found himself confronted by a Tiger II and three Tiger Is of the elite 503rd Heavy Tank Battalion. Supported by only one other Sherman, and aware that their 75mm guns would be ineffective against such monsters, he gave the order to his driver to ram the King tiger. Gormans tank Ballyragget succeeded in colliding with its target before the Tigers 88mm gun could be brought to bear on his Sherman, and with both tanks immobilised the crews quickly abandoned their tanks. Lt. Gorman, however, was not finished and making his way off the field, he returned shortly afterwards with a Sherman Firefly, to finish off the stricken Tiger II and one of the Tiger Is. For this action he was awarded the Military Cross, and his driver L/Cpl Baron the Military Medal.

Prepare to Ram, Operation Goodwood, Normandy, 18th July 1944 by David Pentland. (GS)
Half Price! - £250.00
 Helmand Province, Afghanistan, April, 2011. Men of <i>The Highlanders</i> 4th Royal Regiment of Scotland, patrol through a flowering poppy field near Lashkar Gah.

Poppy Fields by David Pentland.
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 Acting Assistant Commissary J.L. Dalton commissariat and transport department and colour sergeant F. Bourne, during the battle at the front wall about 6pm at Rorkes Drift. Frank Bourne was born  on the 27th April 1854  in Balcombe Sussex, when Bourne was 18 he joined the 24th Regiment in 1872, being promoted to Corporal in 1875 and Sergeant in 1878.  Sergeant Bourne was promoted to Colour Sergeant soon after the rgeiment arrived in Natal.  Colour Sgt bourne was part of B company whose job was to guard the hospital at Rorkes Drift.  Colour Sgt Bourne played a major role in keeping the defending troops effective.  Colour Sgt Bourne was awarded the Distinguished Conduct Medal for his role in the defence, and it is surprising that he was not awarded a Victoria Cross as 11 were awarded for the defence. Col Sgt Bourne retired form the army in 1907, but  joined again for WW1, serving in Dublin.  He was the last survivor of Rorkes Drift, passing away at the age of 91 on the 8th May 1945 by coincidence being VE day.

Pot That Fellow by Mark Churms.
Half Price! - £28.00
 In the year 1070, Saxon England lay under Norman oppression. Only one last centre of resistance remained. The Isle of Ely in the Fenlands of East Anglia. Here, Hereward Leofricson, son of Earl Leofric and Lady Godiva, emerged as a warrior leader. Struggling against overwhelming odds in his defiance of the Normans. The legend of Hereward the Wake was born.

Fire from the Fens, c.1071 by Chris Collingwood.
Half Price! - £80.00
DHM342GL.  Washington Crossing the Delaware by Emanual Gottlieb Leutze.
Washington Crossing the Delaware by Emanual Gottlieb Leutze. (GL)
Half Price! - £300.00
With the full might of Englands Army now gathered to do battle before the besieged Stirling Castle, the young Edward II Plantagenate is confident of victory over the enemy. To the west of the Bannockburn, Robert Bruce, King of Scots kneels to pray with his men and commends his soul to God. The Scottish battle lines are prepared. The Cavalry is in reserve to the rear behind the spearmen and archers (known as Flower of the forest) in tightly packed Schiltrons patiently awaiting the coming onslaught. Unknown to the English, the open marshy ground of no mans land conceals hidden pits and trenches, major obstacles for any mounted charge.  Despite Cliffords and de Beaumonts premature and unsuccessful attempt to relieve the castle the day before, years of victory have taught the brave English knights to regard their Scottish foes with contempt. So, without waiting for the bowmen to effectively weaken the enemy lines the order is hurriedly given to attack! With one rush hundreds of mounted knights led by the impetuous Earl of Gloucester thunder headlong through the boggy ground straight for the impenetrable forest of spears and into defeat and death.  With dash and courage the knights try to force a way through the mass of spears but the Scots stand firm. The momentum of the charge is lost and there is no room to manoeuvre. Everywhere horses and men crash to the ground, casualties amongst the English are horrific. Robert Bruce seizes the moment and orders the exultant army to advance. The Englishmen are slowly pushed back into the waters of the Bannockburn. All discipline is lost as the soldiers and horses madly scramble for the far bank of the burn. Many drown or perish in the crush to escape the deadly melee. Edward II, with his army destroyed, flees with his bodyguard for the safety of Stirling Castle but is refused refuge and has to fight his way south to England. For Robert Bruce and Scotland victory is complete.
Text by Paul Scarron-Jones.

Battle of Bannockburn by Mark Churms. (P)
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