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Lightning QRA Intercept by Michael Rondot.

Lightning QRA Intercept by Michael Rondot.

No.5 Sqn and No.11 Sqn Lightnings intercept a Tu-95 Bear, supported by an essential Victor tanker. QRA, day and night, 24hrs a day, 7 days a week 52 weeks a year, 365 days a year - never a day off, always ready! Over and over again for so many years, the air defences of Britain were regularly tested by Russian Tu-95 Bears as they probed NATO airspace high above the North Sea.
Item Code : MR0070Lightning QRA Intercept by Michael Rondot. - This Edition
PRINTSigned limited edition of 150 prints.

Paper size 27.5 inches x 17.5 inches (70cm x 44cm) Black, Ian
Tuxford, Bob
Lamb, Carl
Williamson, Keith
Spencer, John
+ Artist : Michael Rondot

Signature(s) value alone : £65

All prices on our website are displayed in British Pounds Sterling

Other editions of this item : Lightning QRA Intercept by Michael Rondot. MR0070
Limited edition of 25 artist proofs. Paper size 27.5 inches x 17.5 inches (70cm x 44cm) Durham, Ed
Hopkins, Bruce
Black, Ian
Tuxford, Bob
Lamb, Carl
Russell, Dick
Lightfoot, Bob
Bedwin, Peter
Blackburn, Ron
Williamson, Keith
Spencer, John
+ Artist : Michael Rondot

Signature(s) value alone : £125
£150.00VIEW EDITION...
General descriptions of types of editions :

Extra Details : Lightning QRA Intercept by Michael Rondot.
About all editions :

A photo of the print :

Signatures on this item
*The value given for each signature has been calculated by us based on the historical significance and rarity of the signature. Values of many pilot signatures have risen in recent years and will likely continue to rise as they become more and more rare.
The signature of Flt Lt Carl Lamb

Flt Lt Carl Lamb
*Signature Value : £10

GCI Flight Controller, RAF Neatishead
The signature of Flt Lt Ian Black

Flt Lt Ian Black
*Signature Value : £20

No.11 Squadron, LTF, the last RAF Lightning pilot, Ian still flies the Lightning from Thunder City, Cape Town.
The signature of John Spencer CBE AFC

John Spencer CBE AFC
*Signature Value : £10

Commanded No 11 Squadron and was last Commander of Royal Air Force Binbrook. Also served on No 74, 23, 92, 19 Squadrons and the Lightning OCU at RAF Coltishall

The signature of Marshal of the Royal Air Force Sir Keith Williamson GCB AFC

Marshal of the Royal Air Force Sir Keith Williamson GCB AFC
*Signature Value : £15

Sir Keith Alec Williamson was born in Leytonstone and educated at Bancrofts School and went onto Market Harborough Grammar School. Sir Keith Alec Williamson joined the Service as an airman. Following training as an Aircraft Apprentice he was selected for a cadetship at Raf College at Cranwell and commissioned in 1950. He would go on to command No 23 Squadron and Royal Air Force Gutersloh. In 1972 Williamson became Director of Air Staff Plans at the MOD and was appointed Commandant of the RAF Staff College Bracknell in 1975 and in 1977 went on to be Assistant Chief of Staff at SHAPE moving in 1978 to became Air Officer Commanding-in-Chief at Suppoprt Command. In 1980 he was made Commander-in-Chief RAF Strike Command and then served as Chief of the Air Staff. He became Marshall of the Royal Air Force. He served in the RAF from 1944 to 1985.
The signature of Sqn Ldr Bob Tuxford AFC

Sqn Ldr Bob Tuxford AFC
*Signature Value : £10

Victor pilot 1970 - 1982, ETPS. Captain of Victor XL189, Black Buck One.
The Aircraft :
LightningEnglish Electric (later BAC) Lightning. Originally designed by W F Petter (the designer of the Canberra) The first Lighting Prototype was first flown on the 4th August 1954 by Wing Commander R P Beamont at Boscombe Down. The second prototype P1A, The name of Lightning was not used until 1958) (WG763) was shown at the Farnborough show in September 1955. The Third prototype was flown in April 1957 and was the first British aircraft ever to fly at Mach 2 on the 25th November 1958 The first production aircraft made its first flight on 3rd November 1959 and entered operational service with the RAF on the 29th June 1960with |NO. 74 squadron based at Coltishall. The F1 was followed shortly after by the F1A which had been modified to carry a in-flight refueling probe. The Lightning F2 entered service in December 1962 with no 19 and 92 squadrons. a total of 44 aircraft F2 were built. The F3 came into service between 1964 and 1966 with Fighter Command squadrons, re engined with the Roll's Royce Avon 301 turbojets. The Lightning T Mk 5 was a training version Lightning a total of 22 were built between August 1964 and December 1966. The BAC Lighting F MK 6 was the last variant of the lightning, base don the F3, this was the last single seat fighter and served the |Royal Air Force for 20 years. First Flown on 17th April 1964, and a total of 55 F6 saw service with the Royal Air Force, and the last Lightning F6 was produced in August 1967. A Total of 278 lightning's of all marks were delivered. In 1974 the Phantom aircraft began replacing the aging Lightning's, but 2 F6 remained in service up to 1988 with Strike Command until finally being replaced with Tornado's. Specifications for MK1 to 4: Made by English Electrc Aviation Ltd at Preston and Samlesbury Lancashire, designated P1B, All Weather single seat Fighter. Max Speed: Mach 2.1 (1390 mph) at 36,000 feet Ceiling 55,000 feet Armament: Two 30mm Aden guns and Two Firestreak infra red AAM's. Specificaitons for MK 6: Made by English Electrc Aviation Ltd at Preston Lancashire, designated P1B, All Weather single seat Fighter. Max Speed: Mach 2.27 (1500 mph) at 40,000 feet Ceiling 55,000 feet Range: 800 miles. Armament: Two 30mm Aden guns and Two Firestreak infra red AAM's. or Two Red Top. or two retractable contain 24 spin-stabilized rockets each.
Artist Details : Michael Rondot
Click here for a full list of all artwork by Michael Rondot

Michael Rondot

Michael Rondot is well known in the military aviation world for his distinctive style of aircraft paintings and prints which have made him one of todays most widely collected aviation artists. During his 25 year career as a pilot in the Royal Air Force he flew over 5000 hours in combat jets, including Jaguar fighter bombers during the Gulf War, bringing a unique authority to his paintings that sets them in a class of their own. His portrayals of classic combat aircraft are much sought-after by both aviators and enthusiasts alike for their realism and powerful atmospheric settings.

More about Michael Rondot

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