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The First of the European War by Richard Caton Woodville.


The First of the European War by Richard Caton Woodville.

Captain Grenfell led the 9th Lancers to the action at Audregnies, during the Battle of Mons, against a large body of German infantry who were advancing to encircle the 5th Division. This action was compared to the Charge of the Light Brigade since it demonstrated great bravery but accomplished little. Later in the day Grenfell and his men helped to drag away British guns which were in danger of being captured. In this painting, the artist appears to have combined the two events. Although not the first action of the Great War for which the Victoria Cross waas to be awarded, Grenfell was the first to be gazetted, that is, officially listed in the London Gazette as a recipient.
Item Code : DHM1098The First of the European War by Richard Caton Woodville. - This EditionAdd any two items on this offer to your basket, and the lower priced item will be half price in the checkout! Buy 1 Get 1 Half Price!
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Death and Glory in Flanders Fields by Chris Collingwood.
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Charge of the 9th Lancers by Richard Caton Woodville,
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Titles in this pack :
The First of the European War by Richard Caton Woodville.  (View This Item)
Gallipoli by Charles Dixon.  (View This Item)
Breaking the Hindenburg Line by J P Beadle (B)  (View This Item)
Backs to the Wall by Robert Gibb (B)  (View This Item)
Here They Come by William Barnes Wollen.  (View This Item)
Battle of Gheluvelt 31st October 1914 by J P Beadle (B)  (View This Item)
Charge of the First Life Guards at the battle of Klein Zillebeke November 6th 1914 by Harry Payne.  (View This Item)

Richard Caton Woodville World War One Print Pack.

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Titles in this pack :
Capture of a German Battery by Richard Caton Woodville.  (View This Item)
The First of the European War by Richard Caton Woodville.  (View This Item)
Charge of the 9th Lancers by Richard Caton Woodville  (View This Item)
Cranston Fine Arts Military Art Catalogue (Volume 3)  (View This Item)

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Other editions of this item : The First of the European War by Richard Caton Woodville. DHM1098
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Artist Details : Richard Caton Woodville
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Richard Caton Woodville

WOODVILLE, Richard Caton Born London 1856; died there 1927. Woodville was the most prolific battle artist of the nineteenth and early twentieth century in Britain, producing countless oil paintings and drawings, many for the Illustrated London News. As was the case with several history painters of the Victorian period, he studied at Dusseldorf sometime with Wilhelm Camphausen, the great German military painter, and later in Paris. He experienced was first-hand in Albania and Montenegro towards the end of the Russo-Turkish War in 1877, and later in Egypt during the war of 1882. During the latter conflict, he made numerous sketches and obtained photographs of the trenches at Tel-e-Kebir for his friend, the French military artist, Alphonse de Neuville (q.v.) who had been commissioned to paint a scene of the battle. The fruits of both their labours were shown at the Fine Art Society in 1883, Woodville, exhibiting The Moonlight Charge at Kassassin. In 1884, Woodville exhibited by Royal Command, another picture relating to the Egyptian War. The Guards at Tel-e-Kebir (Royal Collection). His first Royal Academy picture exhibited in 1879, was entitled Before Leuthen, Dec. 3rd, 1757. Thereafter, he was a frequent exhibitor at Burlington House, showing no less than 21 battle pictures, many dealing with contemporary events such as the Second Afghan War, Candahar (Private collection) and Maiwand; saving the Guns (Walker Art Gallery, Liverpool), the Zulu War - Prince Louis Napoleon in Zululand, and the Boer War - Lindley; Whitsunday 1900 (Oxfordshire Light Infantry Association), and Dawn of Majuba (Canadian Military Institute). He painted many historical recreations both in oil and water-colour including a series on famous British battles for the Illustrated London News. He depicted The Charge of the Light Brigade (Royal Collection, Madrid) and The Charge of the 21st Lancers at Omdurman (Walker Art Gallery, Liverpool), Blenheim, Badajos and several Waterloo pictures. During the Great War, he turned his talents to depicting the current events, three of which were exhibited at the Royal Academy. The 2nd Batt. Manchester Regiment taking six guns at dawn near St. Quentin (The Rings Regiment), Entry of the 5th Lancers into Mons (16th/5th Royal Lancers), and Halloween, 1914: Stand of the London Scottish on Messines Ridge (London Scottish Museum Trust) exhibited in the year of his death. During his life, he was the most popular artist of the genre and he was the subject of several articles in magazines and journals. He himself wrote some memoirs in 1914 entitled Random Recollections. He was deeply interested in the army and joined the Royal Berkshire Yeomanry Cavalry in 1879, staying with them until 1914 when he joined the National Reserve as a Captain.

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