Customer Helpline
(UK) : 01436 820269

Shipping Rates
Valuation of Your Collection

You currently have no items in your basket


FREE worldwide shipping for orders over £150

Join us on Facebook!


Buy with confidence and security!
Publishing historical art since 1985

Follow us on Twitter!

AMAZING VALUE SPECIAL OFFERS !

VIEW ALL OF OUR CURRENT SPECIAL OFFERS HERE!
 
Product Search        
Massive savings on this month's big offers including our BUY ONE GET ONE HALF PRICE offer on many prints, many others at HALF PRICE or with FREE PRINTS and all orders over £150 get FREE WORLDWIDE SHIPPING!
Many of our offers end in 11 hours, 56 minutes!

The Red Tails Never Lost a Bomber by Clyde Heron.


The Red Tails Never Lost a Bomber by Clyde Heron.

A harbinger of Adolf Hitlers grand scheme came on March 1, 1938, when Nazi troops moved into the Rhineland, but it hardly raised an eyebrow in the international circles. His treachery did not rear its ugly head again for nearly two years. The worlds perception of the little corporal was radically changed when his blitzkrieg enveloped Austria and rolled through Czechoslovakia, Poland, Norway and the Netherlands. Then on May 28, 1940, Belgium fell, exposing France to the onslaught. Although President Franklin Roosevelt had long realized that the United States entrance into the war was inevitable, it took the invasion of France to awaken the American public to the horrors of this madmans actions. Roosevelt then found overwhelming public support for his appeal for military preparedness. When the massive war mobilization program began, African-Americans were overlooked. The attitudes and apathy of the Federal Government and military officials caused African-American leaders and their white supporters to put pressure on Roosevelt to uphold the Constitution that proclaimed equal treatment for all Americans. This would not only provide personal dignity to all citizens, it would also utilize the valuable human resource. On March 21, 1941, the 99th Pursuit Squadron was activated, and four months later work began on the construction of Tuskegee Air Field in Tuskegee, Alabama. Thus began what the reluctant War Department called the Experiment. Although designed to fail, its success made possible the emergence of the pioneers of African-American aviation. A total of 992 African-American pilots graduated at Tuskegee Institute, and 450 of these were sent overseas to open a new chapter in the annals of combat aviation. One of those who garnered an impressive record in aerial combat is Captain Lee A Archer (later Colonel) who flew with the 332nd Fighter Group. The morning of July 18, 1944, the 332nd Fighter Group took off to escort bombers of the 5th to Memmingen airdrome. The group met with a formation of ME-109s and FW-190s as they approached Udine and Treviso areas. The group shot down 11 enemy planes and damaged another. Archer downed one of the ME-109s. July 20, while escorting B-24s of the 47th Heavy Bombardment Group to Friedrichshafen, the 332nd was challenged by a squadron of ME-109s. Archer fell in behind one, with LT Charles Bussey on his wing. They chased the enemy plane until it crashed into the side of a mountain after being hit by a volley from Archers guns. Nine enemy aircraft were shot down and 26 were detroyed on the ground during an attack on Blechhammer by the 332nd on October 12, 1944. Archer was the top scorer with three victories. Archer was one of 75 Tuskegee airmen to record one or more victories over Hitlers finest. Collectively, these aviators in their distinctive red tail planes shot down 111 enemy planes. Regrettably, 66 tuskegee airmen paid the supreme price as their group earned the accolade that no other group could claim. The Red Tails Never Lost a Bomber.
AMAZING VALUE! - The value of the signatures on this item is in excess of the price of the print itself!
Item Code : DHM8013The Red Tails Never Lost a Bomber by Clyde Heron. - This Edition
TYPEEDITION DETAILSSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSYOUR PRICEPURCHASING
PRINTSigned limited edition of 850 prints.

SOLD OUT (£200, October 2009)
Image size 26 inches x 17 inches (66cm x 43cm)Artist : Clyde HeronSOLD
OUT
NOT
AVAILABLE
All prices on our website are displayed in British Pounds Sterling


Artist Details : Clyde Heron
Click here for a full list of all artwork by Clyde Heron

Clyde Heron

Clyde Heron has received numerous awards for his paintings: the Plainsman Award; the Arrowhead Award; the Golden Spur; and the Jefferson Davis Medal is of particular significance. The medal was presented to the artist by the United Daughters of the Confederacy for his devotion, dedication and integrity in promoting and preserving the history of the South during the War Between the States through his paintings. His meticulous research is shown by the authenticity and realism of his paintings of the military scenes of the period. As a result of his dedication to authenticity and realism, Heron's work has attracted the attention of publishers of historical journals. History students will find his work gracing the covers of historical books published by the University Press, the University Nebraska Press, and the University of North Texas Press. Heron's original paintings are in private collections in England, Scotland, Australia, and throughout the United States. They are also in the public collections of Fort Davis National Historic Site, Ft Davis Texas; Fort Concho National Historic Landmark, San Angelo, Texas; The Gadsden Museum of Fine Art, Gadsden, Alabama; The Confederate Relic Room and Museum, Columbia, South Carolina; The University of Texas Permian Basin; and the Presidential Museum, Odessa, Texas. The latter commission Heron to do portraits of Presidents Lyndon B. Johnson, Gerald ford, and George Bush for its permanent collection. it was with great sadness we learned of the death of Clyde heron. who we believe to be one of the great American military artists, who lived for his art. a noble gentleman. greatly missed

More about Clyde Heron

This Week's Half Price Art

 Victory No 26 for Josef Mai was a 64 Squadron SE5.A on 5th September 1918, here falling victim to the guns of the aces zebra-striped Fokker D.VII 4598/18 of Jasta 5. By the end of the war, his total had risen to 30 aircraft destroyed, Mai himself collecting a number of decorations, among them the Iron Cross 1st and 2nd class. Surviving the Great War, it is believed that he became a flying instructor for the Luftwaffe during World War II, finally being laid to rest in 1982, aged ninety four.

Leutnant Josef Mai by Ivan Berryman. (GL)
Half Price! - £300.00
 Three 501 Sqn Hawker Tempests roar low across the North Sea outbound from Bradwell Bay, Essex, on their way to attack a German airfield at Bad Zwischehhan and nearby rail yards on the night of 2nd October 1944.  The trio comprised of Sqn Ldr Joseph Berry, flying EJ600 (SD-F), Flt Lt E L 'Willy' Williams (SD-L) and Flt Lt C A 'Horry' Hansen.  Berry was to lose his life on this mission, his aircraft being hit by ground fire from soldiers manning a radar station east of Veendam.

Tempest Moon by Ivan Berryman. (GS)
Half Price! - £200.00
The last purely British fighter aircraft to be used by the Royal Air Force, the Lightning offered a truly massive performance advantage over existing equipment when it was introduced into squadron service in 1960, achieving level flight speed of around, 1400mph. The prototype known as the P1 had flown in 1954 but production aircraft were not available until 1959, a long gestation period but perhaps understandable with such an advanced machine with many untried, new features. The painting shows an F1A of 111 squadron taking off from its base at Wattisham. The remarque drawing shows an aircraft of 56 squadron Firebirds in 1963 when they were the official RAF aerobatics team for that year. 337 Lightnings were produced, serving with nine squadrons of the Royal Air Force before being supersede by the Phantom and Tornado.
BAC Lightning by Keith Woodcock.
Half Price! - £20.00
 Wing Commander Ken Wallis flies his WA-115 autogyro over the Shinmoi Crater in the Krishima area of the southern Japanese island of Kyushu in preparation for filming the action sequences for the James Bond film <i>You Only Live Twice</i>.  Those of us who enjoy a certain series of spy films will be much aware of Little Nellie, designed by Wing Commander Ken Wallis MBE She is pictured flying above the tops of extinct volcanoes.  Little Nellie was one of 3 military Type WA-116 built during 1962 and one of these remains today taking part in military exercises and with camouflage bodywork.  These operate in remote military and civilian roles and a specially-silenced WA-117 was used during the Loch Ness investigation and for special photography in Saudi Arabia.  These effective and nimble autogyros have been flown from Naval patrol craft which are too small for helicopters.  The Wallis autogyros have held all 20 of the UK official world records for autogyro speed, time to climb, altitude, range and duration and even now, further world record-breaking flights are being planned.

Little Nellie by Robert Tomlin. (Y)
Half Price! - £60.00

 Shown in the colours of Jasta Boelke and carrying Baumers personal red / white /  black flash on the fuselage, Fokker DR.1 204/17 was the aircraft in which he scored many of his 43 victories. Although the Sopwith Triplane had been withdrawn from service, German pilots frequently found their DR.1s being mistakenly attacked by their own flak batteries and, sometimes, by other pilots. For this reason, in march 1918, Baumers aircraft bore additional crosses on the centre of the tailplane and on the lower wings to aid identification. For some reason, his rudder displayed what appeared to be an incomplete border to the national marking. Nicknamed Der Eiserne Adler - The Iron Eagle - Paul Baumer survived the war, but died in a flying accident near Copenhagen whilst testing the Rohrbach Rofix fighter.  He is shown in action having just downed an RE.8 while, above him, Leutnant Otto Lofflers DR.1 190/17 banks into the sun to begin another attack.

Leutnant Paul Baumer by Ivan Berryman. (GS)
Half Price! - £250.00
 The print depicts the moment as the first Hurricane of 46 squadron of the Royal Air Force, piloted by Sqn Ldr Kenneth Cross, without arrestor hooks or wires approaches the ill-fated carrier HMS Glorious. during the evacuation of Norway in June 1940.  Bing later said <i>We showed them they were wrong</i>. The Fleet Air Arm pilots were delighted saying <i>Marvelous bloody marvelous, now we will get them too</i>.  All had landed safely by 4.30am on June 8th.
Moment of Truth by Keith Woodcock. (Y)
Half Price! - £75.00
Albert Ball in his Nieuport 17 having just shot down a German LVG.  His aircraft, A134, was distinctive in having a bright red spinner.  He was the first Royal Flying Corps pilot to score a hat-trick (3 kills on a single mission) and, in the course of his career, scored another two on his way to his outstanding 44 victories.

Albert Ball by Ivan Berryman. (GL)
Half Price! - £300.00
 Halifaxes of No.76 Squadron RAF en route to another night bombing raid over Germany.  The lead aircraft here has code MP-L.  Serial numbers for aircraft were unique, but codes like MP-L were transferred after an aircraft was lost.  A total of 10 aircraft carrying the codes MP-L were lost from No.76 Squadron.  <br>These aircraft were : <br><br>L9530 : Shot down 12th-13th August 1941. <br>R9452 : Crashed 12th-13th April 1942.<br>W7660 : Shot down 19th-20th August 1942. <br>W7678 : Lost 3rd-4th March 1943.<br>DK172 : Shot down 23rd-24th May 1943.<br>DK200 : Crashed 11th-12th June 1943.<br>LK922 : Shot down 21st-22nd January 1944.<br>LK789 : Shot down 24th-25th April 1944.<br>MZ622 : Crashed 24th-25th May 1944.<br>LL579 : Crashed 27th February 1945.

No.76 Squadron Halifax by Ivan Berryman. (GS)
Half Price! - £250.00
          Home / View All Products                       View Your Basket