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The Last Stand of the Old Guard by Robert Hillingford. (Y)

The Last Stand of the Old Guard by Robert Hillingford. (Y)

The Old Guard being asked to surrender at the end of the Battle of Waterloo.
Item Code : DHM0951YThe Last Stand of the Old Guard by Robert Hillingford. (Y) - This Edition
**Open edition print (12 reduced to clear)

Slight damage to the bottom left of the print, just touching the image - would not be noticeable once framed.
Image size 17 inches x 12 inches (43cm x 31cm)noneHalf
Now : £20.00

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Other editions of this item : The Last Stand of the Old Guard by Robert Hillingford.DHM0951
PRINT Open edition print. Image size 17 inches x 12 inches (43cm x 31cm)noneHalf Price!Now : £23.00VIEW EDITION...
Original coloured lithograph. none£800.00VIEW EDITION...
General descriptions of types of editions :

Artist Details : Robert Hillingford
Click here for a full list of all artwork by Robert Hillingford

Robert Hillingford

Born London 1825. Died there in 1904. Hillingford was a very prolific artist of Historic genre pictures particularly scenes of battle. He was a Costume Realist and like many similar artists of the day such as Crofts, Woodville and Leutze, he studied in Dusseldorf returning to England in 1864, and exhibited his first picture at the Royal Academy two years later. Towards the end of his life he began to paint military scenes particularly events from the Napoleonic Wars, i.e. there are numerous paintings by him depicting incidents before, during and after the battle of Waterloo. Other themes popular with the artist were the battles of the Duke of Marlborough, Dettingen, and military events of the seventeenth century, but Hillingford did produce some contemporary paintings such as Sebastapol; the attack on the Redan exhibited in 1899 and his Royal Academy picture of 1901, South Africa 1901: the dawn of Peace in which Lord Kitchener on horseback holds up a peace proclamation surrounded by Boer Civilians. Hillingford paid close attention to accuracy in details of dress and had a collection of original uniforms. He was Vice President of the Kernoozers Club, the members of which were all collectors of objects d'art and militaria, but he achieved limited fame during his lifetime.

More about Robert Hillingford

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