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Hogoumont by Mark Churms. (B)


Hogoumont by Mark Churms. (B)

Depicting Jeromes Infantry attacking the South gate of the Chateau during the battle of Waterloo.
Item Code : DHM0252BHogoumont by Mark Churms. (B) - This Edition
TYPEEDITION DETAILSSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSYOUR PRICEPURCHASING
PRINT60 copies of the print from the signed limited edition of 1000 prints, each with a slight dent on the image.

Image size 23 inches x 14 inches (58cm x 36cm)Artist : Mark ChurmsHalf
Price!
Now : 55.00

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Other editions of this item : Hogoumont by Mark Churms.DHM0252
TYPEEDITION DETAILSSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSYOUR PRICEPURCHASING
PRINT Signed limited edition of 1000 prints. Image size 23 inches x 14 inches (58cm x 36cm)Artist : Mark Churms90 Off!
Supplied with one or more free art prints!
Now : 70.00VIEW EDITION...
ARTIST
PROOF
Limited edition of 50 artist proofs. Image size 23 inches x 14 inches (58cm x 36cm)Artist : Mark Churms50 Off!Now : 90.00VIEW EDITION...
POSTCARD Postcard size 6 inches x 4 inches (15cm x 10cm)noneAdd any two items on this offer to your basket, and the lower priced item will be half price in the checkout!2.00VIEW EDITION...
General descriptions of types of editions :



Artist Details : Mark Churms
Click here for a full list of all artwork by Mark Churms


Mark Churms

Mark was born in Wales in 1967. He gained his degree in Architectural Studies at Oxford Polytechnic in 1989, but soon his interest in drawing buildings was surpassed by his love of painting horses and in 1991 he began work as a freelance artist. His first commissions were for sporting subjects, Polo, Racing and Hunting. However his consuming passion for military history, particularly of the Napoleonic era, quickly became his dominant theme, with the invaluable counsel of French military experts (accuracy in uniform and terrain of the various battles takes a great deal of time and consultation with many experts across Europe). Mark Churms joined Cranston Fine Arts in 1991 and for a period of 8 years, was commissioned for several series and special commissions. His series of the Zulu War, and of the Battle of Waterloo were the highlights during this period. Mark Churms' deep understanding and detailed knowledge of the period made Mark at that time one of the most prolific and successfull artists for Cranston Fine Arts. Cranston Fine Arts are proud with their series of superb art prints and original paintings painted by Mark Churms in this period. We now offer Mark Churms art prints in special 2 and 4 print packs with great discounts as well as a number of selected original paintings at upto half price.

More about Mark Churms

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