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Golden Era by Jacqueline Stanhope


Golden Era by Jacqueline Stanhope

Item Code : JS0001Golden Era by Jacqueline Stanhope - This Edition
TYPEEDITION DETAILSSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSYOUR PRICEPURCHASING
PRINT Signed limited edition of 500 prints. Paper size 20 inches x 16 inches (51cm x 41cm)Artist : Jacqueline Stanhope£102.00

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Artist Details : Jacqueline Stanhope
Click here for a full list of all artwork by Jacqueline Stanhope

Jacqueline Stanhope

Jacqueline Stanhope was born in 1963 and was educated in Scotland. Facinated by horses and racing she began painting and drawing them at an early age by the young age of 10 she was using oils. She was gifted both academically as well as artistically, she began selling her work in secondary school. She left school at the age of 16 to follow her career in painting on a professional level, chosing this route over a career in medicine. She was facinated by anatomy and science more than art and started freelancing as a graphic and portrait artist. By age 21 she had undertaken work for Walt Disney and had painted football teams. Jacqueline took time out to raise a young family and then re-entered the art world by producing 'Northern Dancer & Sons' a limited edition print. This print led to a rise in her popularity with leaders in the racing world investing in her work. Her work is exhibited annually at Tattersalls December Sales which has also raised her profile with paintings being sold to clients worldwide.

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Leading 30th Corps assault across the Seine at Vernon, 43rd Wessex Division gained an initial foothold on the east bank.  Heroic efforts however by the Royal Engineers of 71st, 72nd and 73rd Field Companies, succeeded in constructing a Class 9 Bailey bridge (David, shown left) and a Second Class 40 bridge (Goliath, shown right)  Despite constant enemy fire this amazing feat was achieved in only 2 days, and allowed 15/19th Hussars Cromwells and 4.7th Dragoons Guards Shermans to cross just in time to repulse a serious German counter attack by Tiger IIs of SS Panzer Abteilung 101.

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