Customer Helpline
(UK) : 01436 820269

Shipping Rates
Valuation of Your Collection

You currently have no items in your basket

Join us on Facebook!


Buy with confidence and security!
Publishing historical art since 1985

Follow us on Twitter!

AMAZING VALUE SPECIAL OFFERS !

VIEW ALL OF OUR CURRENT SPECIAL OFFERS HERE!
 
Product Search        
Massive savings on this month's big offers including our BUY ONE GET ONE HALF PRICE offer on many prints and many others at HALF PRICE or with FREE PRINTS!
Many of our offers end in 8 hours, 57 minutes!
View our Special Offers

Anzio, Italy, February 1944 by David Pentland. (GL)


Anzio, Italy, February 1944 by David Pentland. (GL)

Replacements from 1st Battalion Irish Guards and Sherman tanks of the 46th Royal Tank Regiment move through the debris of Anzio town towards their jump-off positions for the Battle of Campoleone Station.
Item Code : DHM0791GLAnzio, Italy, February 1944 by David Pentland. (GL) - This Edition
TYPEEDITION DETAILSSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSYOUR PRICEPURCHASING
GICLEE
CANVAS
Limited edition of 50 giclee canvas prints.

Image size 36 inches x 24 inches (91.5cm x 61cm)Artist : David Pentland
on separate certificate
Half
Price!
Now : £300.00

Quantity:
HALF PRICE SALE ... HALF PRICE SALE ... HALF PRICE SALE ... HALF PRICE SALE ... HALF PRICE SALE
THIS GICLEE CANVAS IS HALF PRICE!
For a short time, this item is being offered at half of its normal price.
We have many thousands of items like this across our website, offering great value to our customers.
Items included in the offer are changed frequently.
All prices on our website are displayed in British Pounds Sterling



Other editions of this item : Anzio, Italy, February 1944 by David Pentland.DHM0791
TYPEEDITION DETAILSSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSYOUR PRICEPURCHASING
PRINT Signed limited edition of 1150 prints. Image size 25 inches x 16.5 inches (64cm x 42cm)Artist : David PentlandHalf Price!
Supplied with one or more free art prints!
Now : £70.00VIEW EDITION...
ARTIST
PROOF
Limited edition of 50 artist proofs. Image size 25 inches x 16.5 inches (64cm x 42cm)Artist : David Pentland£15 Off!Add any two items on this offer to your basket, and the lower priced item will be half price in the checkout!Now : £125.00VIEW EDITION...
GICLEE
CANVAS
Limited edition of 50 giclee canvas prints. Image size 30 inches x 20 inches (76cm x 51cm)Artist : David Pentland
on separate certificate
Half Price!Now : £250.00VIEW EDITION...
ORIGINAL
PAINTING
Original painting by David Pentland. Image size 36 inches x 24 inches (91.5cm x 61cm)Artist : David PentlandHalf Price!Now : £1800.00VIEW EDITION...
POSTCARDPostcard Postcard size 6 inches x 4 inches (15cm x 10cm)noneAdd any two items on this offer to your basket, and the lower priced item will be half price in the checkout!£2.00VIEW EDITION...
EX-DISPLAY
PRINT
**Signed limited edition of 1150 prints. (2 copies reduced to clear)

Ex-display prints in near perfect condition.
Image size 25 inches x 16.5 inches (64cm x 42cm)Artist : David PentlandHalf Price!Now : £50.00VIEW EDITION...
General descriptions of types of editions :






Extra Details : Anzio, Italy, February 1944 by David Pentland. (GL)
About all editions :

Detail Images :



Artist Details : David Pentland
Click here for a full list of all artwork by David Pentland


David Pentland

One of Europe's Leading Military and Aviation Artists, David Pentland has produced a wealth of Paintings for Cranston Fine arts, who are proud to have David as one of their leading Artists. As you browse down his wonderful work you may be interested to know that many of the Paintings are still available, and to a collector his work would certainly be a valuable addition. David's Paintings have gone up in value over the past 2 years, and have seen a growth in value of nearly 100%.



David with one of his original paintings in the originals gallery at Cranston Fine Arts, and at a print signing session with a print of one of his pencil drawings.

More about David Pentland

This Week's Half Price Art

As the evening draws to a close Napoleon is seen riding amongst his men after their victory at the Battle of Friedland.  Due to the French pressure the Russian Commander General Levin Bennigsen moved his army back to his main camp at Konigsberg in June 1807, while his army of 60,000 men crossed the River Alle at Friedland.  It was faced by a French force of 26,000 under the command of Marshal Jean Lannes. The Russian Commander attacked early on the 14th of June. The much smaller force fought of the Russian attacks for nine hours, giving time for the main French force of 80,000 to arrive. Marshall Neys Force came up from the south and attacked the Russian left flank which gave way all the way along the river until just outside Friedland where it was halted. A second corps under the command of General Laude Victor came to the support of Neys left flank. Victor also brought up 30 Artillery pieces which blasted the Russians at very short range. The Russians that were massed in the tiny village and unable to cross the River received huge numbers of casualties due to the artillery fire. General Bennigsens army was decimated with most of his troops killed, wounded or forced to cross the river.  The actual looses were 11,000 dead, 7,000 wounded and many thousands of troops drowned trying to cross the river. This compared to the French losses of 1372 killed 9,108 wounded.   The French army pursued the Russians with Marshal Soult occupying Konigsberg on June 16th.  A few days later Czar Alexander I arranged a truce and on the 25th of June on a barge like raft on the River Niemen along with the Prussian King Frederick Willaim III drew up the Treaty of Tilset. Prussia ceded to France all the territories West of the Elbe, becoming the Kingdom of Westphalia and from the area of Poland both Russia and Prussia recognised the new state, The Duchy of Warsaw.

Battle of Friedland by Horace Vernet (GS)
Half Price! - £200.00
 The Battle of Aliwal was fought on 28th January 1846 between the British and the Sikhs.  The British were led by Sir Harry Smith, while the Sikhs were led by Ranjodh Singh Majithia.  The British won a victory which is sometimes regarded as the turning point of the First Anglo-Sikh War.  The Sikhs had occupied a position 4 miles (6.4 km) long, which ran along a ridge between the villages of Aliwal, on the Sutlej, and Bhundri.  The Sutlej ran close to their rear for the entire length of their line, making it difficult for them to manoeuvre and also potentially disastrous if they were forced to retreat.  After the initial artillery salvoes, Smith determined that Aliwal was the Sikh weak point.  He sent two of his four infantry brigades to capture the village, from where they could enfilade the Sikh centre.  They seized the village, and began pressing forwards to threaten the fords across the Sutlej.  As the Sikhs tried to swing back their left, pivoting on Bhundri, some of their cavalry tried to threaten the open British left flank.  A British and Indian cavalry brigade, led by the 16th Lancers, charged and dispersed them.  The 16th Lancers then attacked a large body of Sikh infantry.  These were battalions organised and trained in contemporary European fashion by Neapolitan mercenary, Paolo Di Avitabile.  They formed square to receive cavalry, as most European armies did.  Nevertheless, the 16th Lancers broke them, with heavy casualties.  The infantry in the Sikh centre tried to defend a nullah (dry stream bed), but were enfiladed and forced into the open by a Bengal infantry regiment, and then cut down by fire from Smith's batteries of Bengal Horse Artillery.  Unlike most of the battles of both Anglo-Sikh Wars, when the Sikhs at Aliwal began to retreat, the retreat quickly turned into a disorderly rout across the fords.  Most of the Sikh guns were abandoned, either on the river bank or in the fords, along with all baggage, tents and supplies.  They lost 2,000 men and 67 guns. <i><br><br>Comment from the artist, Jason Askew.</i><br><br>This painting shows the extremely violent and brutal clash between British cavalry (16th Lancers) and Sikh infantry at the battle of Aliwal.  The Sikh infantry formed 2 triangles, a version of the famous Allied/British squares used at Waterloo, but the Sikhs, after firing a ragged volley at the attacking horsemen, dropped their muskets and assaulted the cavalry with their traditional Tulwars (sabres) and dhal shields.  These shields are also used offensively, to punch, and to slice with the edge.  Although the British horsemen claimed a victory as they felt they successfully dispersed the Sikh triangles, and forced the Sikh infantry to retreat to the nullah (dry stream bed) in the Sikh rear, this opinion is open to debate.  The Sikhs traditionally fought in loose formations, with tulwar and shield-taking full advantage of their abilities as swordsmen, blades being weapons with which the Sikhs are particularly skilled in the use of.  The Sikhs actually inflicted more casualties on the 16th Lancers than the lancers inflicted on the Sikh infantry.  British eye witnesses spoke of the sight of the grotesquely swollen and distorted dead bodies of men and horses of the Her Majesty's 16th Lancers, stinking in the sun and littering the ground at Aliwal - testimony to the progress of their charge.  The regiment lost 27% of effectives out of a total strength of over 400 effectives.  The lancers were dreadfully hacked about, many being cruelly maimed for life, losing hands and limbs to the slashing strokes of the Sikh blades.  The Sikhs had no compassion for the cavalry horses either - many of the poor animals (over 100 by some accounts) had to be shot, due to having their legs hacked clean off, or being literally disemboweled by Sikh Tulwars.  In the painting, the central figure with the wizard-shaped Turban, is in fact an Akali - a sect of extremely religious Sikhs, who disdained the use of armour, and often fought to the death with a fanatical and suicidal devotion.

The Battle of Aliwal by Jason Askew. (GL)
Half Price! - £300.00
 In 1306 Robert the Bruce was crowned King of the Scots. In 1309 Bruce controlled most of Scotland north of the Firth and Clyde. Over the next few years Bruce conquered the English Garrisons of Perth, Dundee, Roxburgh, Dumfries and St. Andrews, leaving only Stirling in English hands. On 24th June 1314 Robert the Bruce defeated the English army at Bannockburn. The war dragged on until the peace treaty was signed in 1328, recognising Robert the Bruce as King Robert I of Scotland, and Scotland an independent Kingdom. He died the following year.

Robert the Bruce by Chris Collingwood.
Half Price! - £80.00
 88mm AA guns of the 23rd Flak Regiment, used as anti-tank guns by orders of Rommel himself, are shown firing on British Matilda tanks of 4th/7th Royal Tank Regiment.

Action at Arras, France, 21st May 1940 by David Pentland. (P)
Half Price! - £1700.00

DHM396.  The Wounded Cuirassier by Theodore Gericault.
The Wounded Cuirassier by Theodore Gericault.
Half Price! - £25.00
Battle of Waterloo 1815

Royal Horse Guards by Brian Palmer (P)
Half Price! - £600.00
 From their position in a knocked out Soviet T28 tank, the Finnish troops keep up the pressure on the encircled enemy units.

Frozen Hell, Suomussalmi, Finland 1940 by David Pentland. (GS)
Half Price! - £250.00
 The Mark IV Tank of Lt. F. MItchell MC, 1st battalion Tank Corps engages A7V tanks at Villers-Bretonneux, 24th April 1918.

The First Tank versus Tank Action by David Rowlands. (GL)
Half Price! - £300.00
          Home / View All Products                       View Your Basket