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Lancaster Dawn by Anthony Saunders. (D)


Lancaster Dawn by Anthony Saunders. (D)

Depicts a 103 squadron Lancaster returning from a night-time bombing mission.
Item Code : DHM0434DLancaster Dawn by Anthony Saunders. (D) - This Edition
TYPEEDITION DETAILSSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSYOUR PRICEPURCHASING
PRINTGeorge Harris RAF signature series edition of 100 prints from the signed limited edition of 850 prints.

Image size 19 inches x 12.5 inches (48cm x 32cm) Harris, George
+ Artist : Anthony Saunders
90 Off!
Supplied with one or more free art prints!
Now : 100.00

Quantity:
EXCLUSIVE website offer from Cranston Fine Arts - FREE art print(s) supplied with the above item!


Exclusive Offer for Online Orders Only

FREE PRINT : Prelude by Geoffrey R Herickx.

This complimentary art print worth 50
(Size : 20 inches x 15 inches (61cm x 38cm))
has been specially chosen by Cranston Fine Arts to complement the above edition, and will be sent FREE with your order.

This item can be viewed or purchased separately in our shop, HERE


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Lancaster VC by Graeme Lothian.
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Distant Dispersal by Graeme Lothian. (E)
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A Winters Dawn by Philip West.
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Last Long Shadow by Anthony Saunders. (B)
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High Summer by Anthony Saunders. (AP)
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Other editions of this item : Lancaster Dawn by Anthony Saunders.DHM0434
TYPEEDITION DETAILSSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSYOUR PRICEPURCHASING
PRINT Signed limited edition of 850 prints. Image size 19 inches x 12.5 inches (48cm x 32cm)Artist : Anthony Saunders15 Off!Add any two items on this offer to your basket, and the lower priced item will be half price in the checkout!Now : 80.00VIEW EDITION...
PRINTHiggins / Lamb RAF signature series of 100 prints from the signed limited edition of 850 prints. Image size 19 inches x 12.5 inches (48cm x 32cm) Higgins, William Bill
Lamb, Alistair
+ Artist : Anthony Saunders
25 Off!Add any two items on this offer to your basket, and the lower priced item will be half price in the checkout!Now : 95.00VIEW EDITION...
PRINTReid Presentation Edition of 5 Limited Edition Prints, supplied double matted. Image size 19 inches x 12.5 inches (48cm x 32cm) Reid, Bill (matted)
+ Artist : Anthony Saunders
300.00VIEW EDITION...
PRINTBriggs signature edition of 200 prints from the signed limited edition of 850 prints. Image size 19 inches x 12.5 inches (48cm x 32cm) Briggs, Don
+ Artist : Anthony Saunders
15 Off!Add any two items on this offer to your basket, and the lower priced item will be half price in the checkout!Now : 130.00VIEW EDITION...
GICLEE
CANVAS
Limited edition of 50 giclee canvas artist proofs. Image size 30 inches x 20 inches (76cm x 51cm)Artist : Anthony Saunders
on separate certificate
90 Off!Now : 370.00VIEW EDITION...
General descriptions of types of editions :


Signatures on this item
*The value given for each signature has been calculated by us based on the historical significance and rarity of the signature. Values of many pilot signatures have risen in recent years and will likely continue to rise as they become more and more rare.
NameInfo
The signature of Flt Lt George Harris DFC

Flt Lt George Harris DFC
*Signature Value : 40

Flew on Lancasters with 101 Squadron special duties.
The Aircraft :
NameInfo
LancasterThe Avro Lancaster arose from the avro Manchester and the first prototype Lancaster was a converted Manchester with four engines. The Lancaster was first flown in January 1941, and started operations in March 1942. By March 1945 The Royal Air Force had 56 squadrons of Lancasters with the first squadron equipped being No.44 Squadron. During World War Two the Avro Lancaster flew 156,000 sorties and dropped 618,378 tonnes of bombs between 1942 and 1945. Lancaster Bomberss took part in the devastating round-the-clock raids on Hamburg during Air Marshall Harris' "Operation Gomorrah" in July 1943. Just 35 Lancasters completed more than 100 successful operations each, and 3,249 were lost in action. The most successful survivor completed 139 operations, and the Lancaster was scrapped after the war in 1947. A few Lancasters were converted into tankers and the two tanker aircraft were joined by another converted Lancaster and were used in the Berlin Airlift, achieving 757 tanker sorties. A famous Lancaster bombing raid was the 1943 mission, codenamed Operation Chastise, to destroy the dams of the Ruhr Valley. The operation was carried out by 617 Squadron in modified Mk IIIs carrying special drum shaped bouncing bombs designed by Barnes Wallis. Also famous was a series of Lancaster attacks using Tallboy bombs against the German battleship Tirpitz, which first disabled and later sank the ship. The Lancaster bomber was the basis of the new Avro Lincoln bomber, initially known as the Lancaster IV and Lancaster V. (Becoming Lincoln B1 and B2 respectively.) Their Lancastrian airliner was also based on the Lancaster but was not very successful. Other developments were the Avro York and the successful Shackleton which continued in airborne early warning service up to 1992.
Artist Details : Anthony Saunders
Click here for a full list of all artwork by Anthony Saunders


Anthony Saunders

Anthony Saunders must be one of the most outstanding naval and aviation artists around today. He has extraordinary skill in portraying scenes of aerial combat that took place before he was born. Although in his own words Anthony prefers the artistic side of painting war aircraft rather than the historic side, he will spend many hours researching a subject, making sure that it is technically correct in every detail before applying any oil to canvas. The results of this technical and artistic skill are easy to see in his paintings; breathtaking skyscapes graced with the machines of aerial warfare beautifully brought to life with the rich colour that is unique to oil paint. With this skill it is hardly surprising that Anthony also paints many subjects other than aviation; scenes from Crimea and Waterloo are a particular favourite. He is equally at home with landscapes and portraits.

More about Anthony Saunders

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