Customer Helpline
(UK) : 01436 820269

Shipping Rates
Valuation of Your Collection

You currently have no items in your basket

Choose a FREE print if you spend over £220!
See Choice of Free Prints

Join us on Facebook!


Buy with confidence and security!
Publishing historical art since 1985

Follow us on Twitter!

Product Search        

Reach for the Skies by Robert Taylor.


Reach for the Skies by Robert Taylor.

SOLD OUT.
Item Code : RST0037Reach for the Skies by Robert Taylor. - This Edition
TYPEEDITION DETAILSSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSYOUR PRICEPURCHASING
PRINTSigned limited edition prints.

Artist : Robert TaylorSOLD
OUT
NOT
AVAILABLE
All prices on our website are displayed in British Pounds Sterling


The Aircraft :
NameInfo
SpitfireRoyal Air Force fighter aircraft, maximum speed for mark I Supermarine Spitfire, 362mph up to The Seafire 47 with a top speed of 452mph. maximum ceiling for Mk I 34,000feet up to 44,500 for the mark XIV. Maximum range for MK I 575 miles . up to 1475 miles for the Seafire 47. Armament for the various Marks of Spitfire. for MK I, and II . eight fixed .303 browning Machine guns, for MKs V-IX and XVI two 20mm Hispano cannons and four .303 browning machine guns. and on later Marks, six to eight Rockets under the wings or a maximum bomb load of 1,000 lbs. Designed by R J Mitchell, The proto type Spitfire first flew on the 5th March 1936. and entered service with the Royal Air Force in August 1938, with 19 squadron based and RAF Duxford. by the outbreak of World war two, there were twelve squadrons with a total of 187 spitfires, with another 83 in store. Between 1939 and 1945, a large variety of modifications and developments produced a variety of MK,s from I to XVI. The mark II came into service in late 1940, and in March 1941, the Mk,V came into service. To counter the Improvements in fighters of the Luftwaffe especially the FW190, the MK,XII was introduced with its Griffin engine. The Fleet Air Arm used the Mk,I and II and were named Seafires. By the end of production in 1948 a total of 20,351 spitfires had been made and 2408 Seafires. The most produced variant was the Spitfire Mark V, with a total of 6479 spitfires produced. The Royal Air Force kept Spitfires in front line use until April 1954.
Artist Details : Robert Taylor
Click here for a full list of all artwork by Robert Taylor


Robert Taylor

The name Robert Taylor has been synonymous with aviation art over a quarter of a century. His paintings of aircraft, more than those of any other artist, have helped popularise a genre which at the start of this remarkable artist's career had little recognition in the world of fine art. When he burst upon the scene in the mid-1970s his vibrant, expansive approach to the subject was a revelation. His paintings immediately caught the imagination of enthusiasts and collectors alike . He became an instant success. As a boy, Robert seemed always to have a pencil in his hand. Aware of his natural gift from an early age, he never considered a career beyond art, and with unwavering focus, set out to achieve his goal. Leaving school at fifteen, he has never worked outside the world of art. After two years at the Bath School of Art he landed a job as an apprentice picture framer with an art gallery in Bath, the city where Robert has lived and worked all his life. Already competent with water-colours the young apprentice took every opportunity to study the works of other artists and, after trying his hand at oils, quickly determined he could paint to the same standard as much of the art it was his job to frame. Soon the gallery was selling his paintings, and the owner, recognising Roberts talent, promoted him to the busy picture-restoring department. Here, he repaired and restored all manner of paintings and drawings, the expertise he developed becoming the foundation of his career as a professional artist. Picture restoration is an exacting skill, requiring the ability to emulate the techniques of other painters so as to render the damaged area of the work undetectable. After a decade of diligent application, Robert became one of the most capable picture restorers outside London. Today he attributes his versatility to the years he spent painstakingly working on the paintings of others artists. After fifteen years at the gallery, by chance he was introduced to Pat Barnard, whose military publishing business happened also to be located in the city of Bath. When offered the chance to become a full-time painter, Robert leapt at the opportunity. Within a few months of becoming a professional artist, he saw his first works in print. Roberts early career was devoted to maritime paintings, and he achieved early success with his prints of naval subjects, one of his admirers being Lord Louis Mountbatten. He exhibited successfully at the Royal Society of Marine Artists in London and soon his popularity attracted the attention of the media. Following a major feature on his work in a leading national daily newspaper he was invited to appear in a BBC Television programme. This led to a string of commissions for the Fleet Air Arm Museum who, understandably, wanted aircraft in their maritime paintings. It was the start of Roberts career as an aviation artist. Fascinated since childhood by the big, powerful machines that man has invented, switching from one type of hardware to another has never troubled him. Being an artist of the old school, Robert tackled the subject of painting aircraft with the same gusto as with his large, action-packed maritime pictures - big compositions supported by powerful and dramatic skies, painted on large canvases. It was a formula new to the aviation art genre, at the time not used to such sweeping canvases, but one that came naturally to an artist whose approach appeared to have origins in an earlier classical period. Roberts aviation paintings are instantly recognisable. He somehow manages to convey all the technical detail of aviation in a traditional and painterly style, reminiscent of the Old Masters. With uncanny ability, he is able to recreate scenes from the past with a carefully rehearsed realism that few other artists ever manage to achieve. This is partly due to his prodigious research but also his attention to detail: Not for him shiny new factory-fresh aircraft looking like museum specimens. His trade mark, flying machines that are battle-scarred, worse for wear, with dings down the fuselage, chips and dents along the leading edges of wings, oil stains trailing from engine cowlings, paintwork faded with dust and grime; his planes are real! Roberts aviation works have drawn crowds in the international arena since the early 1980s. He has exhibited throughout the US and Canada, Australia, Japan and in Europe. His one-man exhibition at the Smithsonians National Air and Space Museum in Washington DC was hailed as the most popular art exhibition ever held there. His paintings hang in many of the worlds great aviation museums, adorn boardrooms, offices and homes, and his limited edition prints are avidly collected all around the world. A family man with strong Christian values, Robert devotes most of what little spare time he has to his home life. Married to Mary for thirty five years, they have five children, all now grown up. Neither fame nor fortune has turned his head. He is the same easy-going, gentle character he was when setting out on his painting career all those years ago, but now with a confidence that comes with the knowledge that he has mastered his profession.

More about Robert Taylor

This Week's Half Price Art

 R-Robert was dramatically retrieved after nearly forty years on the bed of Loch Ness in Scotland. It is being restored at the Brooklands Museum.

The Loch Ness Wellington by Ivan Berryman. (Y)
Half Price! - £65.00
 Sqn Ldr Billy Drake is shown in Curtiss Kittyhawk Mk1a ET790 claiming a Ju87 Stuka  on the 31st of October 1942.  Sqn Ldr Drake commanded  112 Squadron flying Kittyhawks at Gambut on 24th May 1942.  He claimed a probable Bf109 on 6th June, another probable on  2nd July, destroyed a Bf109 on the 8th, damaged a Ju88 on the ground on the 19th, destroyed a Bf109 on the 24th, two Ju87s on  the 1st September and another Bf109 on the 13th.  Drake shared a Ju87 and probably destroyed another on 1st October 1942, got a probable Bf109 on the 22nd, destroyed another on the 26th, an Me202 on the 27th, a Ju87 on the 31st, a Bf109 destroyed and another damaged on 5th November, a Bf109 destroyed on the ground on the 11th, an He111 destroyed and a Bf109 damaged on the 15th, a Bf110 destroyed and another damaged on the 19th, an Me202 and a Bf109 destroyed on 11th December and he finally shared a Bf109 on the 13th.  Drake was awarded a Bar to the DFC (28.7.42) and the DSO (4.12.42).

Tribute to Squadron Leader Billy Drake by Ivan Berryman. (P)
Half Price! - £700.00
 Viewed from the cockpit, Lancasters of 617 Sqn <i>Dambusters</i> form up at the beginning of their perilous journey to the Ruhr Valley on the night of 16th May 1943 when the Möhne and Eder dams were breached under the codename <i>Operation Chastise</i>.

617 Squadron Outbound to the Ruhr by Ivan Berryman. (P)
Half Price! - £700.00
 A Boeing B17G of the 91st BG USA 8th Airforce returns to English soil on three engines after a fraught daylight mission over Germany.
Back to English Soil by Keith Woodcock. (Y)
Half Price! - £50.00

 Mystery still surrounds just why Manfred von Richthofen risked so much in chasing the novice pilot Wilfred Wop May into Allied-occupied territory on the morning of Sunday, 21st April 1918, but it was to be his last flight, this error of judgement costing him his life. Von Richthofen had broken from the main fight involving Sopwith Camels of 209 Sqn to chase Mays aircraft, but found himself under attack from the Camel of Captain Roy Brown. All three aircraft turned and weaved low along the Somme River, the all red Triplane coming under intense fire from the ground as well as from Browns aircraft. No one knows exactly who fired the crucial bullet, but Manfred von Richthofens aircraft was seen to dive suddenly and impact with the ground. The Red Baron was dead and his amazing run of 80 victories was over. The painting shows Mays aircraft (D3326) in the extreme distance, pursued by DR.1 (425/17) and Browns Camel (B7270) in the foreground.

Captain Roy Brown engages the Red Baron, 21st April 1918 by Ivan Berryman. (GL)
Half Price! - £300.00
 On the morning of 21st April 1917, coastal airship No C.17 was on a routine patrol captained by Sub Lieutenant  E G O Jackson, when sometime around 8.00am, she was attacked by German seaplanes and shot down. Such was their vulnerability that these huge battlebags were an easy target for marauding enemy scouts, their single Lewis guns achieving little by way of defence. The Hansa Brandenburg W.12, on the other hand, was a nimble and useful aircraft that the Germans put to good use in the coastal defence role.

Hansa Brandenburg W.12 – Attack on the C.17 by Ivan Berryman. (P)
Half Price! - £2000.00
 Opened in 1932, Ryde airport became the principal airport for the Isle of Wight, with routes being operated to destinations as far away as Croydon, Bristol and Shoreham, as well as a regular commuter service that took in Southampton, Bournemouth and Portsmouth.  This painting depicts a typical day early in 1936 when aircraft of both Portsmouth, Southsea and Isle of Wight Aviation Ltd  and Railway Air Services were using the airport, in this case, Airspeed Courier G-ADAY and De Havilland Dragon Rapide G-ACPR City of Birmingham respectively.  The airport closed officially in 1939, but may have been used sporadically after the war.  The site of the airport is now occupied by Tesco and McDonalds.

Ryde Airport, 1936 by Ivan Berryman.
Half Price! - £80.00
 Wing Commander Ken Wallis flies his WA-115 autogyro over the Shinmoi Crater in the Krishima area of the southern Japanese island of Kyushu in preparation for filming the action sequences for the James Bond film <i>You Only Live Twice</i>.  Those of us who enjoy a certain series of spy films will be much aware of Little Nellie, designed by Wing Commander Ken Wallis MBE She is pictured flying above the tops of extinct volcanoes.  Little Nellie was one of 3 military Type WA-116 built during 1962 and one of these remains today taking part in military exercises and with camouflage bodywork.  These operate in remote military and civilian roles and a specially-silenced WA-117 was used during the Loch Ness investigation and for special photography in Saudi Arabia.  These effective and nimble autogyros have been flown from Naval patrol craft which are too small for helicopters.  The Wallis autogyros have held all 20 of the UK official world records for autogyro speed, time to climb, altitude, range and duration and even now, further world record-breaking flights are being planned.

Little Nellie by Robert Tomlin. (Y)
Half Price! - £60.00
          Home / View All Products                       View Your Basket