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Home Run by Robert Taylor.


Home Run by Robert Taylor.

SOLD OUT.
AMAZING VALUE! - The value of the signatures on this item is in excess of the price of the print itself!
Item Code : RST0041Home Run by Robert Taylor. - This Edition
TYPEEDITION DETAILSSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSYOUR PRICEPURCHASING
PRINTSigned limited edition of 1250 prints.

Paper size 33 inches x 25 inches (84cm x 64cm) Goodson, Jim
Blakeslee, Don
Olds, Robin
Carson, Leonard Kit
+ Artist : Robert Taylor


Signature(s) value alone : £230
SOLD
OUT
NOT
AVAILABLE
All prices on our website are displayed in British Pounds Sterling


Since this edition is sold out and no other editions are available, here is a similar item which may be of interest :


Last Man Home by Nicolas Trudgian.

£160.00


Mustangs Over the Mediterranean by Nicolas Trudgian.

£160.00

Signatures on this item
*The value given for each signature has been calculated by us based on the historical significance and rarity of the signature. Values of many pilot signatures have risen in recent years and will likely continue to rise as they become more and more rare.
NameInfo


The signature of Brigadier General Robin Olds (deceased)

Brigadier General Robin Olds (deceased)
*Signature Value : £55

After leaving West Point in June 1943, Robin Olds was posted to the 479th Fighter Group in England, joining 434 Squadron. Based at Wattisham in East Anglia, and flying P-38s, he was involved in heavy bomber escort duties and fighter sweeps until the Normandy invasion, soon after which his Squadron converted to P51 Mustangs. by early 1945 Robin Olds was in command of 434 Squadron taking part in the Battle of the Bulge, flying escort missions, and providing air support to the airborne attack across the Rhine. At the end of World War II Robin Olds had 24.5 victories, of which 13 were in the air. Later in Vietnam Robin Olds gained four more victories, flying F4 Phantoms and flew with the 8th Tactical Fighter Wing. Sadly, Robin Olds passed away on 14th June 2007.


Colonel Don Blakeslee (deceased)
*Signature Value : £40

Joining the RAF in 1940 Don Blakeslee flew Spitfires with 401 Squadron. When the Eagle Squadron were formed he transferred as an experienced flight commander with several victories to his credit. An aggressive and fearless fighter pilot, Blakeslee was promoted to lead 133 Squadron, and was described as the best fighter leader the war produced. Already an Ace, he transferred to the USAAF 4th Fighter Group. By the war end he had over four years of continuous combat flying, and 14.5 air victories to his credit. Colonel Don Blakeslee sadly passed away on 3rd September 2008.


Colonel Jim Goodson
*Signature Value : £60

Jim Goodson joined the RAF in 1940. Posted to re-form 133 Eagle Squadron RAF flying Spitfires, he transferred to the USAAF 4th fighter Group in September 1942, commanding 336 Squadron. Flying P47s and then P51s, Jim Goodson flew continuously until he was shot down ten months before the end of the war. He was one of the most highly decorated Aces in the USAAF, with 32 enemy aircraft to his credit.


Leonard Kit Carson
*Signature Value : £75

Leonard 'Kit' Carson with 18.5 victories was the top ace of the 357th Fighter Group. His first victory was on April 8th 1944. He scored all his 18.5 victories flying five mustangs all named Nooky Booky. Kit Carson went onto to run the 357th's combat training school or "Clobber College". Captain Leonard K. Kit Carson, on the 38th mission of his second tour and having nine previous credits, became the second 357th pilot to become an ace in a day. He was squadron commander between 8 April 1945–1 November 1945.
The Aircraft :
NameInfo
MustangThe ubiquitous North American P-51 Mustang, which many consider to be the best all-around fighter of WW II, owes its origins to the British Air Ministry. Following Britains entry into WW II in 1939, the RAF was interested in purchasing additional fighter aircraft from American sources, particularly the Curtiss P-40. Curtiss, which was busy, was unable to guarantee timely delivery so the British approached North American Aviation as a possible second source for the P-40. North American chose to propose its own fighter design which would use the same Allison engine as the P-40. Utilizing new laminar flow wings, the North American fighter was expected to have performance better than the P-40. Developed in record time the new aircraft was designated as a Mustang I by the Brits, whereas the USAAF ordered two for evaluation which were designated XP-51 Apaches. Intrigued with the possibility of using this aircraft also as a dive bomber, North American proposed this to the USAAF which decided to order 500 of the P-51 aircraft to be modified for dive bombing use. Designated as the A-36 Invader, this version of the Mustang utilized dive flaps, and bomb racks under each wing. Some reinforcing of the structural members was also required because of the G-forces to be encountered in dive bombing. A-36s entered combat service with the USAAF prior to any P-51s. In early 1943 the 86th and 27th Fighter Bomber Groups of the 12th Air Force began flying A-36s out of Northern Africa. Despite some early problems with instability caused by the dive flaps, the A-36 was effective in light bombing and strafing roles. It was not, however, capable of dog fighting with German fighters, especially at higher altitudes. Despite these drawbacks one USAAF pilot, Captain Michael T. Russo, who served with the 16th Bomb Squadron of the 27th Fighter Bomber Group, was credited with five confirmed aerial victories in the A-36, thereby becoming the first mustang ace.
Artist Details : Robert Taylor
Click here for a full list of all artwork by Robert Taylor


Robert Taylor

The name Robert Taylor has been synonymous with aviation art over a quarter of a century. His paintings of aircraft, more than those of any other artist, have helped popularise a genre which at the start of this remarkable artist's career had little recognition in the world of fine art. When he burst upon the scene in the mid-1970s his vibrant, expansive approach to the subject was a revelation. His paintings immediately caught the imagination of enthusiasts and collectors alike . He became an instant success. As a boy, Robert seemed always to have a pencil in his hand. Aware of his natural gift from an early age, he never considered a career beyond art, and with unwavering focus, set out to achieve his goal. Leaving school at fifteen, he has never worked outside the world of art. After two years at the Bath School of Art he landed a job as an apprentice picture framer with an art gallery in Bath, the city where Robert has lived and worked all his life. Already competent with water-colours the young apprentice took every opportunity to study the works of other artists and, after trying his hand at oils, quickly determined he could paint to the same standard as much of the art it was his job to frame. Soon the gallery was selling his paintings, and the owner, recognising Roberts talent, promoted him to the busy picture-restoring department. Here, he repaired and restored all manner of paintings and drawings, the expertise he developed becoming the foundation of his career as a professional artist. Picture restoration is an exacting skill, requiring the ability to emulate the techniques of other painters so as to render the damaged area of the work undetectable. After a decade of diligent application, Robert became one of the most capable picture restorers outside London. Today he attributes his versatility to the years he spent painstakingly working on the paintings of others artists. After fifteen years at the gallery, by chance he was introduced to Pat Barnard, whose military publishing business happened also to be located in the city of Bath. When offered the chance to become a full-time painter, Robert leapt at the opportunity. Within a few months of becoming a professional artist, he saw his first works in print. Roberts early career was devoted to maritime paintings, and he achieved early success with his prints of naval subjects, one of his admirers being Lord Louis Mountbatten. He exhibited successfully at the Royal Society of Marine Artists in London and soon his popularity attracted the attention of the media. Following a major feature on his work in a leading national daily newspaper he was invited to appear in a BBC Television programme. This led to a string of commissions for the Fleet Air Arm Museum who, understandably, wanted aircraft in their maritime paintings. It was the start of Roberts career as an aviation artist. Fascinated since childhood by the big, powerful machines that man has invented, switching from one type of hardware to another has never troubled him. Being an artist of the old school, Robert tackled the subject of painting aircraft with the same gusto as with his large, action-packed maritime pictures - big compositions supported by powerful and dramatic skies, painted on large canvases. It was a formula new to the aviation art genre, at the time not used to such sweeping canvases, but one that came naturally to an artist whose approach appeared to have origins in an earlier classical period. Roberts aviation paintings are instantly recognisable. He somehow manages to convey all the technical detail of aviation in a traditional and painterly style, reminiscent of the Old Masters. With uncanny ability, he is able to recreate scenes from the past with a carefully rehearsed realism that few other artists ever manage to achieve. This is partly due to his prodigious research but also his attention to detail: Not for him shiny new factory-fresh aircraft looking like museum specimens. His trade mark, flying machines that are battle-scarred, worse for wear, with dings down the fuselage, chips and dents along the leading edges of wings, oil stains trailing from engine cowlings, paintwork faded with dust and grime; his planes are real! Roberts aviation works have drawn crowds in the international arena since the early 1980s. He has exhibited throughout the US and Canada, Australia, Japan and in Europe. His one-man exhibition at the Smithsonians National Air and Space Museum in Washington DC was hailed as the most popular art exhibition ever held there. His paintings hang in many of the worlds great aviation museums, adorn boardrooms, offices and homes, and his limited edition prints are avidly collected all around the world. A family man with strong Christian values, Robert devotes most of what little spare time he has to his home life. Married to Mary for thirty five years, they have five children, all now grown up. Neither fame nor fortune has turned his head. He is the same easy-going, gentle character he was when setting out on his painting career all those years ago, but now with a confidence that comes with the knowledge that he has mastered his profession.

More about Robert Taylor

This Week's Half Price Art

 Barely 300m above the distinctively meandering Piave River on 17th April 1918, an intense aerial battle took place between Sopwith Camels of 28 Sqn RFC and pilots of Flik 41J of the Austro-Hungarian Air Force near Arcade, north east of Venice.  The Commander of Flik 41J, Godwin von Brumowski, the Austro-Hungarian 'Ace of Aces', dueled with Lieutenant W C Hargrave, flying Camel B6342, a battle in which the distinctive red Albatros D.III (Oef) 153.45, emblazoned with its identifying skull motifs gained the upper hand, sending Lt Hargrave's machine to the ground to claim victory number 31. This 'kill' was shared that day with Oblt Friedrich Navratil, the first of his 10 victories, whose aircraft can be seen in the distance.

Close Combat - The 31st Victory by Ivan Berryman. (GS)
Half Price! - £250.00
Depicting two B17s from 92nd bomb group having joined a lone B24 from 93rd. In the background, the distinctive triangles on the tails of the two aircraft denote membership to the 303rd BG.

Motley Crew by Tim Fisher (GL)
Half Price! - £250.00
 Spitfires of No.92 Sqn in action over Kent during the Battle of Britain.

Spitfires Over Kent by Graeme Lothian. (GS)
Half Price! - £250.00
 A moment during the fraught encounter on 27th May 1940 over Dunkirk between Spitfires of 610 Sqn and an estimated 40 Bf.110s during which three Zerstorers were shot down.

A Dunkirk Encounter by Ivan Berryman. (P)
Half Price! - £270.00

 Designed the brothers Henri and Maurice Farman, the F.40 embodied many of the features of contemporary designs comprising a crew nacelle with pusher propeller and a tail supported by narrow booms and struts. Forty French squadrons were equipped with the type which first entered service in 1915 but, just one year later, they were being withdrawn as rapid developments in fighter design rendered them obsolete. One such example is shown here having surprised a single-seat Taube observation aircraft, which is spotting above some abandoned trenches near a crashed Albatros C.III. The F.40s prominent position for the gunner / observer was one of its qualities and, it is said, inspired the German AGO company when designing their C.1.

Farman F.40 by Ivan Berryman. (P)
Half Price! - £2000.00
 On the morning of 13th April 1917, five RE8s of 59 Sqn, RFC, took off from their base at La Bellevue on a photographic sortie, A3203 carrying a camera, with the other four flying as escorts.  Spads of 19 Sqn and some 52 Sqn Fe.2s were to have joined them as fighter cover, but the rendezvous was never made and the RE8s found themselves alone.  For some unknown reason, this flight of aircraft seemed to have drifted some way north of their intended target - and into the clutches of a group of Jasta 11 Albatros scouts, led by none other than Baron Manfred von Richthofen.  In a relatively short combat, all five RE8s were shot down by their German opponents, one by the Red Baron himself and two by his brother, Lothar, who claimed his fourth and fifth victims, thus becoming an ace, the others being downed by Festner and Wolff in similar aircraft.  For the Red Baron, this was a day of particular significance.  Not only had he now scored more victories than his mentor, Oswald Boelcke, by shooting down his 41st victim, he was later to claim a further two victories that same day - his first triple.  He is depicted here flying Albatros D.III Nr.2253/17.

Brothers in Arms by Ivan Berryman. (GL)
Half Price! - £300.00
 On 1st February 1918, the great Austro-Hungarian ace Godwin von Brumowski found himself abandoned by his wingmen and left to fight off eight Sopwith Camels of 45 Sqn RFC single handed.  On this occasion, it was he that came off the worst, managing to nurse his badly damaged Albatros D.III (Oef) 153.45 back to base, the aircraft becoming engulfed in flames at some point, probably due to a hit in the fuel tank.  The fuselage of his machine was riddled with 26 bullet holes and the fabric of the wings was punctured and shredded, but he continued the fight until his guns jammed and he was forced to break away.  Undaunted, the Ace was back in the air the next day, only to have these dreadful events repeat themselves just three days later, Brumowski again nursing his shattered aircraft home.

Outnumbered by Ivan Berryman. (GL)
Half Price! - £300.00
 As the four P51D Mustangs of Major William T Haltons Yellow Flight, 487th Fighter Squadron took off from Asch, they found themselves in the middle of a massive German attack.  That New Years Day the Luftwaffe had launched hundreds of aircraft in low level raids against the allied airfields across Northern France and Belgium.  The unexpected take-off by the 487th however, ended Jagdgeswader 11s chances of success, with Yellow Flight alone claiming 9 enemy aircraft destroyed.

Dogfight over Asch, Belgium, 09.20 a.m., New Years Day, 1st January 1945 by David Pentland. (GS)
Half Price! - £250.00
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