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Concorde Formation by Robert Taylor.


Concorde Formation by Robert Taylor.

SOLD OUT.
Item Code : RST0017Concorde Formation by Robert Taylor. - This Edition
TYPEEDITION DETAILSSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSYOUR PRICEPURCHASING
PRINT Signed limited edition of 850 prints.

Paper size 34 inches x 25 inches (86cm x 64cm) Trubshaw, Brian
Walpole, Brian
+ Artist : Robert Taylor
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Signatures on this item
*The value given for each signature has been calculated by us based on the historical significance and rarity of the signature. Values of many pilot signatures have risen in recent years and will likely continue to rise as they become more and more rare.
NameInfo
Captain Brian Trubshaw (deceased)
*Signature Value : £30

Ernest Brian Trubshaw was born on January 29th 1924 and educated at Winchester, where he was captain of cricket. He had been captivated by flying since the age of 10, when he saw the Prince of Wales' aircraft land on the beach at Pembrey, Carmarthenshire, not far from where his family then lived. In 1942, he signed up for the RAF, training on a Stearman biplane in America. He joined Bomber Command in 1944, flying Stirlings and Lancasters, before transferring the next year to Transport Command. His flying skills were rated as exceptional and, in 1946, he joined the King's Flight, piloting George VI and other members of the Royal Family; he was occasionally roped in for after-dinner games with the young Princesses at Balmoral. After teaching at the Empire Flying School and the RAF Flying College from 1949-50, Trubshaw was almost sent to Malaya as one of only two RAF pilots who also had helicopter experience. Instead, he was given permission to leave the service to become a test pilot for Vickers-Armstrong, where he remained for 30 years, becoming chief test pilot in 1960, and director of test flights from 1966. Trubshaw worked on the development of the Valiant V-bomber, the Vanguard, the VC-10, and the BAC-111, all of which he test flew. His coolness in saving Britain's prototype VC-10 from disaster on an early test flight won him the Derry and Richards Memorial Medal for outstanding test flying contributing to the advance of aviation in 1965. Structural failure had been threatened when an elevator section broke loose and the aircraft shook as though the tail was shaking the dog. Trubshaw could not read the instruments because of the violent motion, but broadcast to base the nature of the trouble in case he could not get back. He then managed to land the aircraft with only half the elevator control. He later described this manoeuvre as one of my trickier moments. Three years earlier, Trubshaw had been awarded the same medal for his work in the early 1950s on the Valiant jet bomber, on which he tested the delivery system for Britain's first atom bomb, the 10,000 lb Blue Danube. In 1985, on the eve of his retirement, Trubshaw revealed that while flying a Valiant V-bomber, he had been compelled to drop a concrete replica of the weapon into the Thames estuary. Prior to joining the Concorde project, he also flew V-bombers, the aircraft responsible for the nuclear deterrent of the UK. He was the original test pilot for Concorde, Trubshaw flew the British-assembled Concorde 002 from Filton in Bristol to RAF Fairford in Gloucestershire, on April 9 1969. and was awarded the OBE and CBE. He died 25th March 2001.
Captain Brian Walpole
*Signature Value : £20

Concorde pilot who flew Concorde aircraft for over 12 years, commanding the first supersonic service from London to New York. Promoted to General Manager British Airways Concorde Division in the early 1980s, he has won a host of awards, including the freedom of the City of London, and an OBE.
The Aircraft :
NameInfo
ConcordeThe Aérospatiale-BAC Concorde was a turpbojet powered supersonic passenger airliner, produced bewteen the British and French companies. The Concorde programme was instigated through the Anglo-French government treaty which brought together both the French company Aerospatiale and the British Aircraft Corporation (now BEA systems ). The First Concorde prototype flew in 1969, and Concorde entered service in 1976, continuing for 27 years. Only 20 aircraft were built, the development phase represented a substantial economic loss. Both British Airways and Air France were subsidised by their governments to buy the aircraft. The Concorde flew mainly between London and New York or Washington taking less than half the time than any other airliner. The Air France Concordes also flew form Charles Degaulle airport in Paris. The only crash was of a Air France Concorde on the 25th pf July 2000, and the 9/11 terrorist attacks in New York and other financial factors caused the Concorde fleet to cease flying on the 24th October 2003, with the last flights being on the 26th of November 2003. Concorde will remain an aviation great.
Artist Details : Robert Taylor
Click here for a full list of all artwork by Robert Taylor


Robert Taylor

The name Robert Taylor has been synonymous with aviation art over a quarter of a century. His paintings of aircraft, more than those of any other artist, have helped popularise a genre which at the start of this remarkable artist's career had little recognition in the world of fine art. When he burst upon the scene in the mid-1970s his vibrant, expansive approach to the subject was a revelation. His paintings immediately caught the imagination of enthusiasts and collectors alike . He became an instant success. As a boy, Robert seemed always to have a pencil in his hand. Aware of his natural gift from an early age, he never considered a career beyond art, and with unwavering focus, set out to achieve his goal. Leaving school at fifteen, he has never worked outside the world of art. After two years at the Bath School of Art he landed a job as an apprentice picture framer with an art gallery in Bath, the city where Robert has lived and worked all his life. Already competent with water-colours the young apprentice took every opportunity to study the works of other artists and, after trying his hand at oils, quickly determined he could paint to the same standard as much of the art it was his job to frame. Soon the gallery was selling his paintings, and the owner, recognising Roberts talent, promoted him to the busy picture-restoring department. Here, he repaired and restored all manner of paintings and drawings, the expertise he developed becoming the foundation of his career as a professional artist. Picture restoration is an exacting skill, requiring the ability to emulate the techniques of other painters so as to render the damaged area of the work undetectable. After a decade of diligent application, Robert became one of the most capable picture restorers outside London. Today he attributes his versatility to the years he spent painstakingly working on the paintings of others artists. After fifteen years at the gallery, by chance he was introduced to Pat Barnard, whose military publishing business happened also to be located in the city of Bath. When offered the chance to become a full-time painter, Robert leapt at the opportunity. Within a few months of becoming a professional artist, he saw his first works in print. Roberts early career was devoted to maritime paintings, and he achieved early success with his prints of naval subjects, one of his admirers being Lord Louis Mountbatten. He exhibited successfully at the Royal Society of Marine Artists in London and soon his popularity attracted the attention of the media. Following a major feature on his work in a leading national daily newspaper he was invited to appear in a BBC Television programme. This led to a string of commissions for the Fleet Air Arm Museum who, understandably, wanted aircraft in their maritime paintings. It was the start of Roberts career as an aviation artist. Fascinated since childhood by the big, powerful machines that man has invented, switching from one type of hardware to another has never troubled him. Being an artist of the old school, Robert tackled the subject of painting aircraft with the same gusto as with his large, action-packed maritime pictures - big compositions supported by powerful and dramatic skies, painted on large canvases. It was a formula new to the aviation art genre, at the time not used to such sweeping canvases, but one that came naturally to an artist whose approach appeared to have origins in an earlier classical period. Roberts aviation paintings are instantly recognisable. He somehow manages to convey all the technical detail of aviation in a traditional and painterly style, reminiscent of the Old Masters. With uncanny ability, he is able to recreate scenes from the past with a carefully rehearsed realism that few other artists ever manage to achieve. This is partly due to his prodigious research but also his attention to detail: Not for him shiny new factory-fresh aircraft looking like museum specimens. His trade mark, flying machines that are battle-scarred, worse for wear, with dings down the fuselage, chips and dents along the leading edges of wings, oil stains trailing from engine cowlings, paintwork faded with dust and grime; his planes are real! Roberts aviation works have drawn crowds in the international arena since the early 1980s. He has exhibited throughout the US and Canada, Australia, Japan and in Europe. His one-man exhibition at the Smithsonians National Air and Space Museum in Washington DC was hailed as the most popular art exhibition ever held there. His paintings hang in many of the worlds great aviation museums, adorn boardrooms, offices and homes, and his limited edition prints are avidly collected all around the world. A family man with strong Christian values, Robert devotes most of what little spare time he has to his home life. Married to Mary for thirty five years, they have five children, all now grown up. Neither fame nor fortune has turned his head. He is the same easy-going, gentle character he was when setting out on his painting career all those years ago, but now with a confidence that comes with the knowledge that he has mastered his profession.

More about Robert Taylor

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