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Jaguar Sunset by Michael Rondot.


Jaguar Sunset by Michael Rondot.

The Jaguar served with the Royal Air Force from 1974 to 2007 as a strike / attack and reconnaissance fighter bomber, equipping eight squadrons in Germany and the UK during the Cold War, and in the Balkans conflict. Now at the end of its RAF career, it will be remembered as a rugged and reliable aircraft, capable of finding and putting bombs on a target in bad weather with unprecedented accuracy. The painting portrays a favourite haunt of Jaguar pilots: the west coast of Scotland near Torridon looking towards the Isle of Skye and Kyle of Lochalsh, an area where military pilots enjoy some of the most challenging flying in the world.
Item Code : DHM1641Jaguar Sunset by Michael Rondot. - This Edition
TYPEEDITION DETAILSSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSYOUR PRICEPURCHASING
PRINTSigned limited edition of 200 prints.

Paper size 27 inches x 19 inches (69cm x 48cm) Sullivan, John
+ Artist : Michael Rondot


Signature(s) value alone : £10
£75.00

Quantity:
All prices on our website are displayed in British Pounds Sterling



Other editions of this item : Jaguar Sunset by Michael Rondot. DHM1641
TYPEEDITION DETAILSSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSYOUR PRICEPURCHASING
ARTIST
PROOF
Signed limited edition of 50 artist proofs. Paper size 27 inches x 19 inches (69cm x 48cm) Griggs, Steve
Pixton, Bill
Sullivan, John
Crook, Mike
Bagshaw, Dave
+ Artist : Michael Rondot


Signature(s) value alone : £55
£120.00VIEW EDITION...
General descriptions of types of editions :


Extra Details : Jaguar Sunset by Michael Rondot.
About all editions :

A photo of the print :

Signatures on this item
*The value given for each signature has been calculated by us based on the historical significance and rarity of the signature. Values of many pilot signatures have risen in recent years and will likely continue to rise as they become more and more rare.
NameInfo
The signature of Wing Commander John Sullivan

Wing Commander John Sullivan
*Signature Value : £10

CO of No.6 Squadron, the last RAF Jaguar squadron at the retirement of the aircraft in 2007.
The Aircraft :
NameInfo
Jaguar
Artist Details : Michael Rondot
Click here for a full list of all artwork by Michael Rondot


Michael Rondot

Michael Rondot is well known in the military aviation world for his distinctive style of aircraft paintings and prints which have made him one of todays most widely collected aviation artists. During his 25 year career as a pilot in the Royal Air Force he flew over 5000 hours in combat jets, including Jaguar fighter bombers during the Gulf War, bringing a unique authority to his paintings that sets them in a class of their own. His portrayals of classic combat aircraft are much sought-after by both aviators and enthusiasts alike for their realism and powerful atmospheric settings.

More about Michael Rondot

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 The Black Widow is a formidable creature.  It lurks in the dark, carefully chooses its moment of attack and strikes unseen, cutting down its prey with deadly certainty.  Northrop could not have chosen a more apt name with which to christen their new night fighter when the P61 Black Widow entered service in the spring of 1944.  The first aircraft designed from the start as a night fighter, the P61 had the distinction of pioneering airborne radar interception during World War II, and this remarkable twin engined fighter saw service in the ETO, in China, the Marianas and the South West Pacific.  Under the command of Lt Col O B Johnson, one of the P61s greatest exponents, the 422nd Night Fighter Squadron was the leading P61 outfit in the ETO, destroying 43 enemy aircraft in the air, 5 buzz bombs and hundreds of ground based vehicles, becoming the most successful night fighter squadron of the war.  Flying a twilight mission in his P-61 Black Widow on October 24, 1944, Colonel Johnson and his radar operator have picked up a formation of three Fw190s, stealthily closing on their quarry in the gathering dusk, O.B. makes one quick and decisive strike, bringing down the enemy leader with two short bursts of fire. Banking hard, as the Fw190 pilot prepares to bale out, he brings his blazing guns to bear on a second Fw190, the tracer lighting up the fuselage of his P-61.

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