Customer Helpline
(UK) : 01436 820269

Shipping Rates
Valuation of Your Collection

You currently have no items in your basket

Choose a FREE print if you spend over £220!
See Choice of Free Prints

Join us on Facebook!


Buy with confidence and security!
Publishing historical art since 1985

Follow us on Twitter!

AMAZING VALUE SPECIAL OFFERS !

VIEW ALL OF OUR CURRENT SPECIAL OFFERS HERE!
 
Product Search        

Dawn Sortie by Gerald Coulson.


Dawn Sortie by Gerald Coulson.

With its sleek, graceful design, instantly recognisable by its thin, aerodynamically advanced elliptical wings, the Supermarine Spitfire was the creation of R. J. Mitchell, an aeronautical creative genius. His fighter was to become not only the most important Allied aircraft of World War II, but the most famous British fighter in history. Mitchells design for the Spitfire was so fine that everyone who ever saw it, flew it, or fought in it was captivated for eternity. When American Eagle Squadron ace Jim Goodson transferred from Spitfires to fly his 4th Fighter Group P-47 Thunderbolt, he said it was like moving from a sports car to a truck. I fell in love with her the moment I was introduced. I was captivated by her sheer beauty; she was slimly built with a beautifully proportioned body and graceful curves just where they sohuld be; so said Lord Balfour, Britains under Secreatry of State for War in 1938, not of his wife but of the Spitfire. A sentiment echoed by generations of aviators and enthusiasts ever since. In the hands of an experienced pilot it was nearly invincible, and even legendary Luftwaffe leader Adolf Galland, when asked by Goering what he needed to overcome the RAF, replied: Give me a squadron of Spitfires!. Gerald Coulsons majestic painting captures a pair of Spitfire Mk1s at dawn high above the clouds over southern England in late 1940. An iconic tribute from the artist to the greatest fighter aircraft of all time.
Item Code : DHM1624Dawn Sortie by Gerald Coulson. - This EditionAdd any two items on this offer to your basket, and the lower priced item will be half price in the checkout! Buy 1 Get 1 Half Price!
TYPEEDITION DETAILSSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSYOUR PRICEPURCHASING
PRINT Signed limited edition of 350 prints.

Paper size 32.5 inches x 15 inches (83cm x 38cm) Davis, Alan
Henderson, Gordon
Taussig, Kurt
+ Artist : Gerald Coulson
£90 Off!
Supplied with one or more free art prints!
Now : £120.00

Quantity:
EXCLUSIVE website offer from Cranston Fine Arts - FREE art print(s) supplied with the above item!


Exclusive Offer for Online Orders Only

FREE PRINT : Where Thoroughbreds Play by Ivan Berryman.

This complimentary art print worth £45
(Size : 12 inches x 9 inches (31cm x 23cm))
has been specially chosen by Cranston Fine Arts to complement the above edition, and will be sent FREE with your order.

This item can be viewed or purchased separately in our shop, HERE


All prices on our website are displayed in British Pounds Sterling



Other editions of this item : Dawn Sortie by Gerald Coulson. DHM1624
TYPEEDITION DETAILSSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSYOUR PRICEPURCHASING
ARTIST
PROOF
Limited edition of 50 artist proofs.

SOLD OUT.
Image size 32.5 inches x 15 inches (83cm x 38cm) Evans, Ken
Nowosielski, Darek
Davis, Alan
Henderson, Gordon
Taussig, Kurt
+ Artist : Gerald Coulson
Add any two items on this offer to your basket, and the lower priced item will be half price in the checkout!SOLD
OUT
VIEW EDITION...
General descriptions of types of editions :


Signatures on this item
*The value given for each signature has been calculated by us based on the historical significance and rarity of the signature. Values of many pilot signatures have risen in recent years and will likely continue to rise as they become more and more rare.
NameInfo
The signature of Flight Lieutenant Alan Davies

Flight Lieutenant Alan Davies
*Signature Value : £35

Joining the RAF in 1943, Alan Davies did his pilot training in America. Returning to the UK he flew Spitfire MkXIVs with an OTU, before joining 225 Tactical Reconnaissance Squadron flying Spitfire Mk IXs. At the end of the war, he remained with the squadron, first at Klagenfurt in Austria, then Udine in Italy, and served briefly with 253 Squadron.
The signature of Flying Officer Kurt Taussig

Flying Officer Kurt Taussig
*Signature Value : £40

Czech Kurt was sent, age 15, by his parents on the Kindertrnsport to England from Czechoslovakia in June 1939 to escape the Nazi persecution of the Jews. Determined to fight the Germans he joined the RAF at eighteen in late 1942, and after training was posted to the Middle East to join 225 Squadron flying Spitfires on photo-reconnaissance duties in Tunisia, the Sicily landings, and in Italy.
The signature of Squadron Leader Gordon Henderson DFC

Squadron Leader Gordon Henderson DFC
*Signature Value : £40

Gordon Henderson joined the RAF in 1941, at Lords Cricket Ground, and after training in America returned home in 1943. He was then posted to 225 Squadron in North Africa, flying Spitfire Mk IXs in Tactical and Photographic Support to the First Army, completing a total of 105 sorties. For his second tour he rejoined 225 Squadron, becoming its Commanding Officer.
The Aircraft :
NameInfo
SpitfireRoyal Air Force fighter aircraft, maximum speed for mark I Supermarine Spitfire, 362mph up to The Seafire 47 with a top speed of 452mph. maximum ceiling for Mk I 34,000feet up to 44,500 for the mark XIV. Maximum range for MK I 575 miles . up to 1475 miles for the Seafire 47. Armament for the various Marks of Spitfire. for MK I, and II . eight fixed .303 browning Machine guns, for MKs V-IX and XVI two 20mm Hispano cannons and four .303 browning machine guns. and on later Marks, six to eight Rockets under the wings or a maximum bomb load of 1,000 lbs. Designed by R J Mitchell, The proto type Spitfire first flew on the 5th March 1936. and entered service with the Royal Air Force in August 1938, with 19 squadron based and RAF Duxford. by the outbreak of World war two, there were twelve squadrons with a total of 187 spitfires, with another 83 in store. Between 1939 and 1945, a large variety of modifications and developments produced a variety of MK,s from I to XVI. The mark II came into service in late 1940, and in March 1941, the Mk,V came into service. To counter the Improvements in fighters of the Luftwaffe especially the FW190, the MK,XII was introduced with its Griffin engine. The Fleet Air Arm used the Mk,I and II and were named Seafires. By the end of production in 1948 a total of 20,351 spitfires had been made and 2408 Seafires. The most produced variant was the Spitfire Mark V, with a total of 6479 spitfires produced. The Royal Air Force kept Spitfires in front line use until April 1954.
Artist Details : Gerald Coulson
Click here for a full list of all artwork by Gerald Coulson


Gerald Coulson

Gerald Coulson has been painting professionally for over 30 years and has a reputation that is second to none. Entirely self taught, he developed his technique to such a high standard that his work was published as fine art prints, enabling him to begin a full time painting career in 1969. Since that time his work, covering many different subjects, has been published and marketed worldwide as both open and limited edition prints. Gerald has had many one-man shows both in the UK and the USA and his work has been extensively exhibited throughout the world. A recent one man show of his in the UK attracted more than 3000 people in two days. The Fine Art Trade Guild have placed him in the top ten best selling artists no less than fifteen times - three times at number one. Coulson's passion for aircraft stems from childhood. This passion led to an apprenticeship as an aircraft engineer after which he served in the RAF as a technician and with British Airways as an engineer at Heathrow. His knowledge of aircraft engineering, combined with his drawing ability, led to him becoming a Technical Illustrator of service manuals for Civil and Military aircraft. These experiences and technical background have allowed him an insight and intimate knowledge of the aircraft he paints. Along with a unique ability to capture these aircraft on canvas this naturally led to a painting career which he has developed to successfully cover a wide variety of subjects. Following a trip to the 1991 British Grand Prix his interest in Motor racing was fuelled. His ability to capture the technical detail and a talent for painting subjects at speed meant that this was a perfect natural progression alongside his aviation work and he is now also firmly established as one of the worlds leading motor racing artists. A Vice President and founder member of the Guild of Aviation Artists he is a four times winner of the Flight International Trophy for outstanding aviation painting. He qualified for his pilots licence in 1960 and is still actively flying today - mostly vintage aircraft, and can often be seen buzzing over the Fens of Cambridgeshire in a Tiger Moth. Whatever the subject he paints, whether aviation, landscape or portrait, his unique ability to capture the realism and 'mood'of the scene is unsurpassed, making him one of the most widely collected and highly regarded artists in the world today.

More about Gerald Coulson

This Week's Half Price Art

 A tribute to the glider crews and airborne troops who participated in the glider operations during D-Day.  The British Horsa glider (known as the flying coffin) was used by British, Canadian and American airborne forces during the invasion.  Approximately 100 glider pilots were killed or wounded during the D-Day operations.

D-Day Invasion : Tribute to the Glider Troops by Ivan Berryman. (P)
Half Price! - £550.00
 Wing Commander J R Baldwin is depicted flying Typhoon MN934 whilst commanding 146 Wing, 84 Group operating from Needs Oar Point in 1944, en route to a bombing raid on 20th June with other Typhoons of 257 Sqn in which both ends of a railway tunnel full of German supplies were successfully sealed.

Typhoons Over Normandy by Ivan Berryman. (AP)
Half Price! - £90.00
 Two Spitfire Mk1Bs of 92 Squadron patrol the south coast from their temporary base at Ford, here passing over the Needles rocks, Isle of Wight, in the Spring of 1942.

In Them We Trust†by Ivan Berryman. (AP)
Half Price! - £100.00
 Even the most faithful of Messerschmitt Me 109 pilots that also flew the Focke-Wulf Fw190 grudgingly admitted the well-proportioned and aesthetically pleasing Fw190 was the finest single-seat fighter in the Luftwaffes armoury during World War II. Soon after its arrival on the Channel Front in 1941, when initial bugs were ironed out, this superb fighter came close to fighter design perfection by the standards of the day. Just as the Mk IX Spitfire held the mantle as Britains most outstanding combat fighter of the war, so was the Fw190 regarded by experienced Luftwaffe pilots. Within months of its operational debut the Fw190 was causing widespread consternation among RAF pilots, the new fighter equal to the Mk IX Spitfire in all but its ability in the tightest of turning circles. By 1944 the technically superb Fw190 came into its own in the great air battles against the USAAFs massed daylight raids. The defence of the Reichs western airspace rested on the shoulders of a few Jagdgschwarden who, against steadily increasing odds, were tasked with interception and destruction of the attacking American heavy bombers. Flying alongside the two established Channel fighter wings JG2 Richthofen and JG26 Schlageter, equipped with Fw190s and led by the great fighter ace Oberst Walter Oesau, JG1 joined the battle in defence of northern Germany. Nicolas Trudgians painting Storm Chasers depicts the Fw190As of I./JG1, distinguished by their distinctive black and white striped cowls, scrambling from the snow-covered Dortmund airfield on 10 February 1944 to intercept another inbound American daylight raid. Nicks dramatic view of this technically supreme fighter conveys its true class as it hurtles over the airfield, its undercarriage retracting as the Fw190 accelerates into the climb. Below, sharing the airfield with I./JGI, are the Fw190s of the newly formed Sturmstaffel 1, identified by their black-white-black tail bands, seen taxiing out to join in the interception. Despite bad weather conditions the Luftwaffes defending fighters scored heavily that day, inflicting severe losses on the Americans, claiming 29 bombers and 8 fighters shot down in the action.

Storm Chasers by Nicolas Trudgian. (Y)
Half Price! - £110.00

 Leutnant Klaus Bretschneider, Staffelkapitan of 5./JG300 kicks up the dust as he taxies his Fw190 A-8 Red One from its forest hiding place into the sunlight in preparation for take-off. The scene is northern Germany, November 1944. The Staffelkapitan will lead his 190s in a massed sturm intercept upon incoming American bombers. With Allied fighters dominating the skies, Luftwaffe fighter units took desperate measures to conceal their whereabouts. Commonplace were these hurriedly prepared strips, often near dense forests.

Timber Wolf by Nicolas Trudgian.
Half Price! - £110.00
 easyJet is one of the largest operators of the Airbus A319 with some 142 of the type on its strength.  G-EZAM is depicted beginning its final approach.

easyJet Airbus A319 by Ivan Berryman. (P)
Half Price! - £700.00
 Adolf Galland hunts down another victim on a raid over the English Channel during the Battle of Britain.

Adolf Galland by Ivan Berryman. (P)
Half Price! - £600.00
 A Bristol Beaufort Mk I of No 22 Squadron attacks a railway marshalling yard during raids on the French coast in the Autumn of 1940.

Bristol Beaufort by Ivan Berryman. (P)
Half Price! - £600.00
          Home / View All Products                       View Your Basket