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Tomahawk by Mark Churms. (P)

Tomahawk by Mark Churms. (P)

Item Code : MC0042PTomahawk by Mark Churms. (P) - This Edition
Original Painting by Mark Churms. Size 30 inches x 24 inches (76cm x 61cm)Artist : Mark Churms£500 Off!Now : £1500.00

This fantastic original painting is part of our huge original collection of over 350 paintings.
The price shown is already discounted, but we are also happy to consider any reasonable offer for this item.
Please email us at or call on international (+44)1436 820269 or from UK on 01436 820269 and we will be happy to discuss this item with you.
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Artist Details : Mark Churms
Click here for a full list of all artwork by Mark Churms

Mark Churms

Mark was born in Wales in 1967. He gained his degree in Architectural Studies at Oxford Polytechnic in 1989, but soon his interest in drawing buildings was surpassed by his love of painting horses and in 1991 he began work as a freelance artist. His first commissions were for sporting subjects, Polo, Racing and Hunting. However his consuming passion for military history, particularly of the Napoleonic era, quickly became his dominant theme, with the invaluable counsel of French military experts (accuracy in uniform and terrain of the various battles takes a great deal of time and consultation with many experts across Europe). Mark Churms joined Cranston Fine Arts in 1991 and for a period of 8 years, was commissioned for several series and special commissions. His series of the Zulu War, and of the Battle of Waterloo were the highlights during this period. Mark Churms' deep understanding and detailed knowledge of the period made Mark at that time one of the most prolific and successfull artists for Cranston Fine Arts. Cranston Fine Arts are proud with their series of superb art prints and original paintings painted by Mark Churms in this period. We now offer Mark Churms art prints in special 2 and 4 print packs with great discounts as well as a number of selected original paintings at upto half price.

More about Mark Churms

This Week's Half Price Art

DHM324.  Les Ordannces by Jean Louis Ernest Meissonier.
Les Ordannces by Jean Louis Ernest Meissonier.
Half Price! - £30.00
. Captain F Macbeans Company, 1st Battalion Royal Artillery in action on the right of the British line, firing its 12 pounder guns against French Cavalry and Infantry. By permission of David Rowlands.  Battle of Minden  1st August 1759.  Major battle of the Seven years war.  After the French victory in April at Bergen, The French Army 60,000 strong under the command of Duc Louis de Contades marched northwards towards Hanover.   To block this French Advance the Prussian Army under Field Marshall The Duke of Brunswick decided to hold the line at Minden.  The Duke of Brunswick could only raise a force of 45,000 men including a British Contingent under Lord George Sackville of 6 regiments, a detachment of cavalry and some artillery.   The French opened the battle attacking,  the British Infantry regiments probably due to a misunderstanding, advanced and they were followed by the Hanoverian Infantry.  They attacked the French cavalry.  The Infantry advanced only stopping to let off a volleys of fire.  This unconventional use of Infantry against cavalry, the French force confused and suffering losses broke.  The victory was in Ferdinands grasp, he ordered his cavalry forward but the British general Sackville refused to send his cavalry after the French. For this action he was later court-martialled by King George II and cashiered from the army.  The French were able to withdraw in order, but their losses had been 7,000 men and 43 artillery guns.   The British and Hanoverian losses were less than 3,000 with 1500 of these casualties inflicted on the British Infantry.  This battle ended all French hopes of capturing Hanover.  British Regiments at Minden. 12th of Foot. (Suffolk Regiment)  20th Foot. (Lancashire Fusiliers ) 23rd of Foot. (Welch Fusiliers),  25th of Foot, (Kings own Scottish Borderers), 37th of Foot. (Royal Hampshire Regiment),  51st Foot   (Kings own Yorkshire Light Infantry)

The Battle of Minden, 1st August 1759 by David Rowlands.
Half Price! - £55.00
 Baron de Donops Brigade at the Battle of Waterloo, 5.30pm, 18th June 1815.  After four hours of fighting, the squadrons of Napoleons 3rd Cavalry Corps finally join the massed assaults on the battered allied infantry squares.  With the 42 year old marechal de camp Frederic-Guillaume de Donop at their head, the 2nd and 3rd Cuirassier Regiments break from a trot into a canter as they clear the ridge.  The heavy cavalry are smashed against the steadfast bayonets of the redcoats and countercharged by light horsemen.  In one of these encounters the general himself is terribly wounded and falls from his horse. His son (aide-de-camp) is also injured.  Both are reported missing and presumed captured.  Although the generals body is not found,it is certain that he met his death in the muddy fields of Waterloo alongside many of his brigade.  In 1895 his name is inscribed on the north face of LArc de Triomphe in Paris in recognition of his service to France.

La Charge (Donops Cavalry at Waterloo) by Mark Churms. (Y)
Half Price! - £50.00
Displaying the captured standards from the Battles of Austerlitz and Ulm through the streets of Paris.
Remise Au Senat Des Trophees by Edouard Detaille.
Half Price! - £30.00

 Panzer v Ausf. D Panthers of SS Panther Division Das Reich make their debut during the initial stages of the German summer offensive for Kursk. This unit with others of the SS Panzer Korps made the deepest advances into the well-prepared Soviet lines. Complete success however, was to elude them when outrunning their supporting divisions at Prokhorovka they were forced to halt for six days.

Operation Zitadelle by David Pentland. (GL)
Half Price! - £300.00
Alexanders infantry and cavalry overwhelm the Indian army of King Porus at the Jhelum River. Maddened by the disaster the kings elephants kept colliding with friends and foes alike, according to Arrian. Soon after the victory, Alexanders men, weary and homesick, demanded that he turn back.

The Last Great Battle by Tom Lovell.
Half Price! - £55.00
 In July 1879 during the Afghan Campaign. Ayub Khan and an army of over 35,000 warriors were marching onto Kandahar. The British force under the command of General Burrows decided to fight. With a force, no more than 3,300 strong, took up position in a tiny hamlet of Mahmudabad, within 2 hours many of the British had been slaughtered, but with nightfall the remnants of the brigade retreated. The picture shows C battery of the Royal Horse Artillery withdrawing with the enemy in hot pursuit.

Saving the Guns at the Battle of Maiwand by Richard Caton Woodville (B)
Half Price! - £20.00
 Last stand of the 24th South Wales Borderers at Isandhlwana during the Zulu War. The battle of Isandhlwana, a Zulu victory over the British forces on 22nd January 1879 about 100km north of Durban. Lord Chelmsford led a column of forces to seek out the Zulu army camped at Isandhlwana, while patrols searched the district. After receiving a report, Chelmsford set forth at half strength, leaving six companies of the 24th Regiment, two guns, some Colonial Volunteers and a native contingent (in all about 1,800 troops) at the camp. Later that morning an advanced post warned of an approaching Zulu army. Shortly after this, thousands of Zulus were found hidden in a ravine by a mounted patrol but as the patrol set off to warn the camp, the Zulus followed. At the orders of the Camp Commander, troops spread out around the perimeter of the camp, but the Zulu army broke through their defences. The native contingent who fled during the attack were hunted down and killed. The remaining troops of the 24th Regiment, 534 soldiers and 21 officers, were killed where they fought. The Zulus left no one alive, taking no prisoners and leaving no wounded or missing. About 300 Africans and 50 Europeans escaped the attack. Consequently, the invasion of Zulu country was delayed while reinforcements arrived from Britain.

Battle of Isandhlwana, 22nd January 1879 by Brian Palmer. (Y)
Half Price! - £50.00
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