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San Sebastian - Ensign Figure Study by Mark Churms. (P)


San Sebastian - Ensign Figure Study by Mark Churms. (P)

Study for the original painting Assault on the Breach of San Sebastian.
Item Code : MC0034PSan Sebastian - Ensign Figure Study by Mark Churms. (P) - This Edition
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ORIGINAL
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Original Pencil Drawing by Mark Churms.

Paper size 12 inches x 8 inches (31cm x 20cm)Artist : Mark ChurmsHalf
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Artist Details : Mark Churms
Click here for a full list of all artwork by Mark Churms


Mark Churms

Mark was born in Wales in 1967. He gained his degree in Architectural Studies at Oxford Polytechnic in 1989, but soon his interest in drawing buildings was surpassed by his love of painting horses and in 1991 he began work as a freelance artist. His first commissions were for sporting subjects, Polo, Racing and Hunting. However his consuming passion for military history, particularly of the Napoleonic era, quickly became his dominant theme, with the invaluable counsel of French military experts (accuracy in uniform and terrain of the various battles takes a great deal of time and consultation with many experts across Europe). Mark Churms joined Cranston Fine Arts in 1991 and for a period of 8 years, was commissioned for several series and special commissions. His series of the Zulu War, and of the Battle of Waterloo were the highlights during this period. Mark Churms' deep understanding and detailed knowledge of the period made Mark at that time one of the most prolific and successfull artists for Cranston Fine Arts. Cranston Fine Arts are proud with their series of superb art prints and original paintings painted by Mark Churms in this period. We now offer Mark Churms art prints in special 2 and 4 print packs with great discounts as well as a number of selected original paintings at upto half price.

More about Mark Churms

This Week's Half Price Art

 St. Charmond Assault tanks of the French 10th Heavy Tank battalion move through Villers-Cotterets forest in preparation for the 10th Army counterattack on the German Soissons-Rheims salient.

A Saint goes to War - The Second Marne Offensive, France 18th July 1918 by David Pentland. (P)
Half Price! - £1600.00
Battle of Isandhlwana.   Zulu victory over the British forces on 22nd January 1879 about 100km north of Durban. Lord Chelmsford led a column of forces to seek out the Zulu army camped at Isandhlwana, while patrols searched the district. After receiving a report, Chelmsford set forth at half strength, leaving six companies of the 24th Regiment, two guns, some Colonial Volunteers and a native contingent (in all about 1,800 troops) at the camp. Later that morning an advanced post warned of an approaching Zulu army. Shortly after this, thousands of Zulus were found hidden in a ravine by a mounted patrol but as the patrol set off to warn the camp, the Zulus followed. At the orders of the Camp Commander, troops spread out around the perimeter of the camp, but the Zulu army broke through their defences. The native contingent who fled during the attack were hunted down and killed. The remaining troops of the 24th Regiment, 534 soldiers and 21 officers, were killed where they fought. The Zulus left no one alive, taking no prisoners and leaving no wounded or missing. About 300 Africans and 50 Europeans escaped the attack. Consequently, the invasion of Zulu country was delayed while reinforcements arrived from Britain.

Isandhlwana 22nd January 1879 by Stuart Liptrot. (GS)
Half Price! - £250.00
A dynamic work showing Napoleon mounted on his favourite horse Marengo, under a surprise attack from Russian Cossacks.
Napoleons Peril at Brienne Le Chateau by Robert Hillingford. (GS)
Half Price! - £200.00
 1st Lieutenant Otto Carius commanding 2nd Company of the 502nd heavy tank Battalion, with eight Tigers, advanced towards the village of Malinava (a northern suburb of Dunaburg), to halt the Russian advance. Following a reconnaissance Lieutenant Otto Carius explained his plan to take the village. He decided to attack using only two tanks because there was only one narrow road leading to the village.  Six Tigers therefore remained in the reserve while Lt Carius and Lt. Albert Kerschers (one of the most decorated commanders of sPzAbt 502)  tanks moved towards the village. Speed was the essence and afterwards, Otto Carius recalls that the entire battle did not last more than 20 minutes. in this short time, Carius and Kerscher knocked out 17 of the new JS-1 Stalin and 5 T-34 tanks. Following this he deployed 6 of his tanks in an ambush against the remainder of the Soviet tank battalion advancing toward him, unaware of their lead companies demise. Surprise was complete and a further 28 tanks were destroyed along with their supporting trucks and vehicles, the complete battalion had been wiped out for no loss.

The Tigers Roar, Malinava, Latvia, July 22nd 1944 by David Pentland. (GS)
Half Price! - £250.00

 The Battle for Point 112, a strategically positioned hill just a few miles south-west of Caen, was the scene of the most violent fighting between German and British armor, artillery and ground troops during the weeks immediately following the D-Day invasion, in June 1944.  Desperate to regain Hill 112, on July 9th, the Tiger tanks of SS Panzer Battalion 102 were ordered to advance.  2 Kompanies Tigers managed to occupy the eastern slopes of the hill, while 1 Kompanie came under fire as they rached the first houses in the small village of Maltot.  At this point they came head on to British Sherman tanks.  Entering the village firing his 88, Unterscharfuhrer Fey in tank 138 quickly knocked out three Shermans at 200 yards range, and by the evening of July 10th the Panzers had re-taken Maltot.  But Allied artillery had driven the Germans off Hill 112.  The battle raged on for another three weeks when on August 1st the Allies frove the Germans off Point 112 for the final time.  Tigers of SS Panzer Battalion 102 yet again advance towards the infamous hill, passing two Shermans knocked out in the previous days fighting. Overhead, Me109s of II./JG26 give aerial support as the German armour makes a last ditch attempt to repel the advancing forces, in their effort to hold the important city of Caen.

Tigers in Normandy by Nicolas Trudgian. (B)
Half Price! - £170.00
 Lt Gonville Bromhead stands over Private Hitch, B Co. 2/24th. Rorkes Drift, front barricade

Plugging the Gap by Mark Churms.
Half Price! - £65.00
Described as the Deathknell of the Confederacy - Sharpsburg (Antietam to the North) was a savage bloodletting for both sides. It was said to be the bloodiest day of the American Civil War. In the painting, below the Dunkard church confederate General John Bell Hoods Texas Division - or what was left of it- stand in line of battle. In the distance Union Major General John Sedgwicks division can be seen advancing on the rebel lines. During the ghastly four hour struggle the Confederates managed to hold and then repel the bloodied remnants of Sedgwicks division back to the east woods and at about 10.30am, the carnage around the Dunkard church had ended. Eventually though, the Confederate forces were in retreat, loosing Sharpsburg to the Union but prepared to fight on for two and a half more years, bloodied but unbeaten.

Bloodied But Unbeaten (The Battle for the Dunkard Church During the Battle of Sharpsburg, September 17th 1862) by Chris Collingwood. (GS)
Half Price! - £300.00
 The Battle of Isandlwana on 22 January 1879 was the first major encounter in the Anglo-Zulu War between the British Empire and the Zulu Kingdom.  Eleven days after the British commenced their invasion of Zululand in South Africa, a Zulu force of some 10,000-12,000 warriors attacked a portion of the British main column consisting of about 1,800 British, colonial and native troops and perhaps 400 civilians.  The Zulus were equipped mainly with the traditional Assegai iron spears and cow-hide shields, but also had a number of muskets and old rifles though they were not formally trained in their use.  The British and colonial troops were armed with the state-of-the-art Martini-Henry breech-loading rifle and two 7 pounder artillery pieces as well as a rocket battery.  Despite a vast disadvantage in weapons technology, the numerically superior Zulus ultimately overwhelmed the poorly led and badly deployed British, killing over 1,300 troops, including all those out on the forward firing line.  The Zulu army suffered around 350 killed, and up to several hundred wounded.  The battle was a crushing victory for the Zulus and caused the abandonment of the first British invasion of Zululand.

The Battle of Isandlwana by Jason Askew. (GM)
Half Price! - £300.00
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