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Troop Leader of the 17th Lancers, Hounslow 1854 by Mark Churms. (P)


Troop Leader of the 17th Lancers, Hounslow 1854 by Mark Churms. (P)

Study for the original painting Last Review Before the Charge.
Item Code : MC0019PTroop Leader of the 17th Lancers, Hounslow 1854 by Mark Churms. (P) - This Edition
TYPEEDITION DETAILSSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSYOUR PRICEPURCHASING
ORIGINAL
PAINTING
Original Pencil Drawing by Mark Churms.

Paper size 12 inches x 8 inches (31cm x 20cm)Artist : Mark Churms£100 Off!
Supplied with one or more free art prints!
Now : £260.00

Quantity:
EXCLUSIVE website offer from Cranston Fine Arts - FREE art print(s) supplied with the above item!


Exclusive Offer for Online Orders Only

FREE PRINT : Last Review Before the Charge by Mark Churms.

This complimentary art print worth £100
(Size : 24 inches x 16 inches (61cm x 41cm))
has been specially chosen by Cranston Fine Arts to complement the above edition, and will be sent FREE with your order.

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Artist Details : Mark Churms
Click here for a full list of all artwork by Mark Churms


Mark Churms

Mark was born in Wales in 1967. He gained his degree in Architectural Studies at Oxford Polytechnic in 1989, but soon his interest in drawing buildings was surpassed by his love of painting horses and in 1991 he began work as a freelance artist. His first commissions were for sporting subjects, Polo, Racing and Hunting. However his consuming passion for military history, particularly of the Napoleonic era, quickly became his dominant theme, with the invaluable counsel of French military experts (accuracy in uniform and terrain of the various battles takes a great deal of time and consultation with many experts across Europe). Mark Churms joined Cranston Fine Arts in 1991 and for a period of 8 years, was commissioned for several series and special commissions. His series of the Zulu War, and of the Battle of Waterloo were the highlights during this period. Mark Churms' deep understanding and detailed knowledge of the period made Mark at that time one of the most prolific and successfull artists for Cranston Fine Arts. Cranston Fine Arts are proud with their series of superb art prints and original paintings painted by Mark Churms in this period. We now offer Mark Churms art prints in special 2 and 4 print packs with great discounts as well as a number of selected original paintings at upto half price.

More about Mark Churms

This Week's Half Price Art

  Objective Steel, 26th February 1991.  Just before the start of the ground offensive, the artist was invited by 3rd Battalion The Royal Regiment of Fusiliers to join them in the desert, and jumped at the opportunity.  After various adventures with other units in trying to reach their location in the flat, featureless terrain, I was attached to the crew of a Warrior Armoured Fighting Vehicle of C Company, Callsign Zero Charlie, commanded by Captain Bob Keating.  The Battlegroup made a wide sweep around the enemy and attacked them unexpectedly from the west.  The area codenamed Objective STEEL consisted of dugouts, trenches and artillery pieces.  In this painting, soldiers are dismounting from Warriors with fixed bayonets to capture Iraqi artillery, which was uselessly pointing to the South.  The green pennant flying from an antenna denotes C Company.  The black desert rat painted on the rear stowage bin was the badge of 4th Armoured Brigade.  The battlegroup halted around the final Iraqi gun positions on STEEL at 1445 hours, and about 800 prisoners in all were taken.  I was able to take some photographs of the enemy's 155 mm guns here.  The ground was littered with MLRS bomblets.  At 1502 hours, nine British soldiers were killed and 12 seriously injured as a result of a tragic mistake by US Air Force pilots, who engaged and destroyed two of the Warriors of C Company.  David Rowlands was asked to depict these two vehicles, call signs Two Two and Two Three, in this painting.

Assault on Iraqi Artillery Positions, 3rd Fusiliers Battle Group by David Rowlands. (GL)
Half Price! - £300.00
 Superb figure study of the 82nd Airborne in 1944.

82nd Airborne by Chris Collingwood. (Y)
Half Price! - £50.00
The American Civil War saw not only the split between north and south but also even between family members.
Brother Against Brother by Chris Collingwood.
Half Price! - £85.00
The 7th Hussars are part of the Light Cavalry are shown charging the French lines during the Battle of Waterloo.
Charge of the 7th Hussars at Waterloo by Henry Martens.
Half Price! - £25.00

The Battle at Rorke's Drift, also known as the Defence of Rorke's Drift, was an action in the Anglo-Zulu War. The defence of the mission station of Rorke's Drift, under the command of Lieutenant John Chard of the Royal Engineers, immediately followed the British Army's defeat at the Battle of Isandlwana on 22nd January 1879, and continued into the following day, 23rd January.  150 British and colonial troops successfully defended the garrison against an intense assault by approximately 2000 Zulu warriors. The intense and noisy Zulu attacks on Rorke's Drift came very close to defeating the tiny garrison, but were ultimately repelled by blasts of Martini-Henry rifle fire-and some smart bayonet work-with some guts behind the bayonet thrusts! Eleven Victoria Crosses were awarded to the defenders, along with a number of other decorations and honours. Of particular note in the painting is the dog 'Pip' - he survived Isandlwhana by retreating along the fugitive's trail to Rorke's Drift. During the Zulu attacks on Rorke's drift, Pip did his part in the defence - by jumping on the mealie bag parapets and barking at Zulus- who were hiding in the long grass and sneaking up to the defences, then biting any Zulu who came within range. Unfortunately Pip was not officially recognised for his part in the action. He was not awarded a VC, on the basis that he was a volunteer canine that accompanied an officer, rather than a War Office issued canine. Conversely, if Pip had been killed, then he would not have been officially listed as a casualty, as he accompanied the army in a strictly private capacity. British army horses were in a different category as they were War Office issue, therefore the loss of a horse in action, or to disease, carried a financial liability for the War Office.

The Defence of Rorke's Drift by Jason Askew. (P)
Half Price! - £3200.00
 One of the last cavalry charges in British Military history, 8th November 1917.

The Charge of the Warwickshire and Worcestershire Yeomanry at Huj by Lady Elizabeth Butler. (Y)
Half Price! - £25.00
 Fourteen A7V Sturmpanzerwagen and supporting infantry led the final push towards the strategic allied supply hub of Amiens. The panzers were divided into 3 groups, the first Skopnik with 3 tanks attacked and took Villers Bretoneux. The second group Uihlein of seven tanks struck towards the Bois DAquenne, while the third group Steinhardt comprising Elfriede, Nixe, Siegfried and Schnuck drove towards Cachy. The attack may well have succeeded but for the unexpected intervention of Britsh Mk IV and medium Whippet tanks.

The New War Elephants, Cachy, France 24th April 1918†by David Pentland. (GS)
Half Price! - £250.00
 Pioneers were among the first British troops to land on the beaches of Normandy on D-Day, by 1st August 1944 there were over 35,500 pioneers in Normandy. The painting shows the various activities of the pioneers during the D-Day landings.

Sword Beach by Terence Cuneo.
Half Price! - £50.00
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