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Mosquito Bite by Geoff Lea. (P)


Mosquito Bite by Geoff Lea. (P)

RAF Mosquitos attack a German supply train.
Item Code : DHM1610Mosquito Bite by Geoff Lea. (P) - This Edition
TYPEEDITION DETAILSSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSYOUR PRICEPURCHASING
ORIGINAL
PAINTING
Original Painting by Geoff Lea.

Size 30 inches x 20 inches (76cm x 51cm)Artist : Geoff LeaHalf
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The Aircraft :
NameInfo
MosquitoUsed as a night fighter, fighter bomber, bomber and Photo-reconnaissance, with a crew of two, Maximum speed was 425 mph, at 30,300 feet, 380mph at 17,000ft. and a ceiling of 36,000feet, maximum range 3,500 miles. the Mosquito was armed with four 20mm Hospano cannon in belly and four .303 inch browning machine guns in nose. Coastal strike aircraft had eight 3-inch Rockets under the wings, and one 57mm shell gun in belly. The Mossie at it was known made its first flight on 25th November 1940, and the mosquito made its first operational flight for the Royal Air Force as a reconnaissance unit based at Benson. In early 1942, a modified version (mark II) operated as a night fighter with 157 and 23 squadron's. In April 1943 the first De Haviland Mosquito saw service in the Far east and in 1944 The Mosquito was used at Coastal Command in its strike wings. Bomber Commands offensive against Germany saw many Mosquitos, used as photo Reconnaissance aircraft, Fighter Escorts, and Path Finders. The Mosquito stayed in service with the Royal Air Force until 1955. and a total of 7781 mosquito's were built.
Artist Details : Geoff Lea
Click here for a full list of all artwork by Geoff Lea


Geoff Lea

Geoffrey Lea, Aviation artist from the North of England, specilised in Aviation oil paintings. Geoff lea has been painting for over 35 years and his aviation art has featured in many aviaiton books and a number of sought after aviation art prints. Geoff now resides in Australia, and Cranston Fine Arts commissioned a number of paintings in the late 1980s to early 1990s for a series of limited edition art prints, and have available a number of signed limited editions as well as low cost open edition art prints. A number of original oil paintings are also available at fantastic trade discounted prices.

More about Geoff Lea

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